First Settlers of Kendall County 1828-1830

Table of Contents

 Introduction............................................................................................................................ 2

Formation of Counties in Illinois.............................................................................................. 2

The 1830 census.................................................................................................................... 3

Missionary Rev. Jesse Walker................................................................................................. 4

Kendall County's First Families............................................................................................... 6

Robert Beresford Family..................................................................................................... 6

Frederic M. Countryman Family........................................................................................... 8

John Dougherty II Family.................................................................................................... 9

James Ferguson............................................................................................................... 11

Aaron Hawley Family........................................................................................................ 11

Pierce Hawley Family........................................................................................................ 11

Baly, Baley, Bailey Hobson Family.................................................................................... 14

William Parcell.................................................................................................................. 17

Walter Selvey Family........................................................................................................ 17

Peter Piche/Specie........................................................................................................... 18

Stephen J.  Sweet............................................................................................................ 19

Vetal Vermette Family....................................................................................................... 20

Edmund Weed Family....................................................................................................... 23

References........................................................................................................................... 25

Index................................................................................................................................... 30

 

 

 

Kendall County Pioneers 1828-1830

Introduction


Initially many Illinois counties were larger than they are today, but as settlement occurred, areas were spun off to form other counties. Kendall County was formed by detaching six townships from La Salle County and three townships from Kane County.[1]

The following is a discussion of the historical aspects that led to the development of Kendall County, and to the extent possible, the history and genealogy of its earliest pioneers and settlers.

Formation of Counties in Illinois


St. Clair County was established by proclamation of Governor Arthur St. Clair in 1790 and is the oldest county in Illinois. Madison County was established by proclamation of Governor Ninian Edwards September 14, 1812 and is the second oldest county in Illinois. Other counties had to wait for legislative approval and the required minimum population to organize. Illinois law provided that a county could not be organized until 350 people lived within its boundaries. With legislative approval, and a minimum of 350 inhabitants, residents were authorized to elect county officials and complete the organizational process. Thus, for many counties there were two dates for their formation. If the dates differ, the first is the date the legislature approved the creation of the county, the second is the date it was fully organized.

Peoria County was created under the provisions of an act approved by the legislature January 13, 1825. "An act to form a new county out of the country in the vicinity of Fort Clark." At this time there were no counties organized north of Fort Clark. Most of the country north of the third principal meridian formerly part of Sangamon County, between Indiana on the east and the Mississippi River on the west, and north to Wisconsin was attached to Peoria County for judicial purposes. Illinois law provided that the citizens of the attached part could be taxed for certain purposes but could not be taxed to purchase public building sites, or to pay for construction of the sponsoring county's public buildings. Legal events often occurred in attached territories. In such cases, records pertaining to these events may be found in the county they were attached to. 

Under the law establishing Peoria County an election was to be held March 1, 1825. According to the poll-book, the first election in Peoria County was actually held March 7, 1825. Qualified voters living within the bounds of Peoria County and the attached territory were eligible to vote. In a census taken by John L. Bogardus in 1825, there were 1,236 people in Peoria County and the attached territory. In all this vast area, Fort Clark, i.e. Peoria, was the only place to vote. Consequently, only sixty-six votes were recorded. Voters with names familiar to Kendall County historians were Robert Beresford, Aaron Hawley, Pierce Hawley, Stephen Sweet, and Rev. Jesse Walker.[2]

Peoria County was governed by a Board of County Commissioners, and the territory attached for judicial purposes was subject to the jurisdiction of the Commissioners' Court. The first meeting of the Board of County Commissioner's Court[3] was held March 8, 1825. On order of the Board, Aaron Hawley was appointed Treasure of Peoria County.[4]

Robert Beresford was a member of the first Peoria County Grand Jury, which met in June 1825. In the same month, the first county allowance was granted Aaron Hawley for services rendered to the county. Aaron Hawley and John L. Bogardus were recommended to the Governor as persons appropriate for appointment to the office of Justus of the Peace. Frederic Countryman and Elijah Hyde were appointed Constables.[5]

At the December 1825 term of the Commissioner's Court, Peoria County and the territory subject to its jurisdiction was divided into three election precincts. The Chicago precinct with elections to be held at the "Agency House", the Peoria precinct with elections to be held at the County Clerk's office, and the Mackinaw precinct with elections to be held at Jesse Dillon's house. The Mackinaw precinct approximated present day Tazewell County.[6]

According to 1825 tax records only 123 residents of this vast area paid taxes. Assessor John L. Bogardus certified a list of the names and residences of taxpayers. Taxpayer's with names familiar to Kendall County historians were, Robert Beresford, Fred Countraman (sic Countryman), Aaron Hawley, Pierce Hawley, and Jesse Walker, residents of Fox River.[7] Edmund Weed was listed as a resident of Ten-Mile Creek, and Peter Piche a resident of Chicago.

The second election in Peoria County was held August 7, 1826. At the March 6, 1826 session of the Commissioner's Court a fourth election precinct was established with the following boundaries. The boundaries of the Fox River precinct included the territory north of Senatchwine Creek to the River La Page (Du Page.)[8] All general and special elections were to be held at the house of Jesse Walker, near the junction of the Illinois and Fox Rivers (Ottawa) and that Aaron Hawley, Henry Allen, and James Walker were appointed election judges."[9]

At the June 2, 1826 session of the Commissioner's Court, a fifth election precinct called Fever River was established in northwestern Illinois. The precinct included the Fever River lead mines, and the area that became Jo Davies, Mercer and Warren Counties.[10] The judges for the Fox River Precinct for the August election were changed in the same session. Election judges were to be James Walker, Pierce Hawley, and Robert Beresford.[11]

Election returns for the August 7, 1826 election in the Fox River precinct were not reported, but the vote in each of the other four precincts was as follows: Peoria, 81; Mackinaw, 51; Chicago, 31; and Fever River, 202. Total votes reported 365.[12]

The 1830 census


In 1825, an act was passed by the Illinois Legislature to form a county to be called Putnam. The proposed county was to include most of the territory attached to Peoria County including the area that became Kane, Kendall, and La Salle Counties.  

In 1830, Augustus Langworthy was appointed to enumerate the inhabitants of Peoria and the proposed Putnam Counties. He was to enumerate every free white and free colored (black) person living in Peoria County and the proposed Putnam County, which included all of northeastern Illinois including the village of Chicago.

Langworthy began taking the census in Peoria County and worked his way around the northeastern part of the state. After completing the census of Chicago and Fort Dearborn he returned to Peoria using a different route, passing through the Fox River Precinct on both legs of his trip. Langworthy's data was combined into a single census with no indication of where those enumerated lived.

The 1830 census of Peoria (Peo) and Putnam (Put) Counties included the two counties plus the rectangular grid section in northeastern Illinois. Populated areas in the later included the village of Chicago and Fort Dearborn, Dixon's Ferry (Dixon), the Fox River Settlement from Ottawa to Holderman's Grove and Walker's Grove (Plainfield.)
image001.jpg

A final census report was filed November 24, 1830.  A total of 1269 free white persons and 41 free colored persons were enumerated for a total of 1310 people, which included 107 soldiers garrisoned at Fort Dearborn. The only inhabitants identified by name in the 1830 Federal census were "heads of households." A total of 200 heads of household were identified although some were single men and the garrison at Fort Dearborn was counted as a single household. Age and sex categorized those counted.[13]

Enumerator Langworthy found eight heads of households in Big Grove Township but did not find Kendall Township's Specie Grove pioneers. The Frederic Countryman, John Dougherty, William Parcell, Walter Selvey, Vetal Vermette, and Edmund Weed households were found on the trip from Peoria to Chicago. The Pierce Hawley and Bailey Hobson households were found on the return trip from Chicago to Peoria.

Missionary Rev. Jesse Walker


Rev. Jesse Walker was born June 9, 1766 in Rockingham County, Virginia. He immigrated to Southern Illinois in about 1806 and in 1820 preached the first Methodist sermon in St. Louis.[14]

In 1824, Rev. Walker was appointed missionary to the settlements between the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and Fort Clark (Peoria). In the fall of 1824, Rev. Walker established a school for the Indians at Fort Clark.[15] While there, Rev. Walker became acquainted with many of the people living in and around the fort, which included the Robert Beresford, Aaron Hawley, and Pierce Hawley families.

In 1825, the Illinois Conference, Illinois District, of the Methodist Church resolved to establish a mission in northern Illinois to Christianize and educate the Indians of the Illinois and Fox River Valleys. Rev. Walker was appointed missionary to the Potawatomi Indians and given the authority and responsibility to organize the enterprise.[16] Rev. Walker's instructions were to establish a mission about 80 miles above Peoria at or near the mouth of the Fox River.

In the spring of 1825, Aaron and Pierce Hawley accompanied Rev. Walker to the St. Louis area to obtain the necessary equipment, tools and supplies to establish the mission. The items required were obtained either by purchase or gift. Funds from the church, and individual contributions were sufficient for the party to obtain two teams of oxen, two wagons, eight or ten milk cows and calves, a few young cattle and some pigs. Food supplies included bacon, buckwheat, corn, flour, potatoes, and other grocery items. It was necessary to bring blacksmithing, carpentry, and farming tools as well.

The precise location of their starting point is unknown but was in the St. Louis area.[17] To move the supplies north, a large keelboat was chartered and loaded with the bulk of the food and equipment.[18], [19] At the same time, the wagons were loaded and pulled overland by the oxen. The loose livestock accompanied the wagons and were driven north. In addition to Rev. Walker and the Hawley brothers, four or five men were hired to help make the trip.         

Construction of the mission and clearing ground for a farm was a huge task. Rev. Walker needed help so he enlisted a number of his Peoria acquaintances to help him. According to the record, five white families made the trip from Peoria to the mission site.[20] The compiler's research indicates they were the Rev. Jesse Walker, Robert Beresford, Aaron Hawley, Pierce Hawley, and Henry Allen families.[21] Robert Beresford's associate James Ferguson was probably included in the group.

In the spring of 1825, Rev. Walker and, the other missionary families traveled up the Illinois River to the mouth of the Fox River, arriving at their destination in June 1825.[22] When they arrived, a white man named Frederic H. Countryman, and about 200 Potawatomi Indians were there to greet them. Countryman had been living with the Indians long enough to learn their language and agreed to serve as the missionaries' interpreter.[23]

A conference, which lasted two or three days, was held with the Indians to discuss the group's purpose and to obtain the Indian's permission to establish the mission. Presents were made to the Indians and an agreement was reached that satisfied all parties.

As soon as an agreement was reached, some of the new arrivals started to erect shanties to shelter the families and to store the goods brought by boat. Others, with the help of the oxen, began to "break" ground to plant "sod" corn, potatoes, turnips, and buckwheat. Still other members of the party set to work felling trees and preparing timber to erect log cabins. Two cabins were built, which were the first two houses built in what became Ottawa. When they were completed, one cabin was occupied by one of the Hawley families and the other by the Beresford family.

The site selected for the mission was on south bank of the Illinois River on the bluff opposite the mouth of the Fox River. Shortly after the first two cabins were completed it was decided that the mission station was not in the right place.[24] The largest Potawatomi village in the area was located on an island several miles up the Fox River near the mouth of Somonauk Creek. Rev. Walker made an exploratory trip up the east side of the Fox River where he found a beautiful grove with a wonderful spring about twenty miles from the mouth of the river. It was decided this was the place to erect the permanent mission buildings. The site selected was near the head of Mission Creek in present-day Mission Township, and became known as Mission Point.[25] Reverend Walker called the mission, Salem Mission.[26]

Most of the party moved to the site selected and spent the winter preparing to fence a large farm in the spring. The Hawley and Beresford families spent the first winter in the two cabins on the south side of the Illinois River. The following spring the Beresford and Hawley families joined the others at the second mission station.

A two-story house with a shingle roof was constructed of hewed logs to accommodate the missionaries. The building was 50 feet by 20 feet, and contained five separate apartments (rooms) for the people living at the mission.[27] A combination chapel and school, blacksmith shop, chicken house and springhouse were also constructed.

In 1825, Rev. Jesse Walker's son-in-law, James Walker, and his youngest daughter, Jane G. (Walker) Walker, were living in Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois. In the fall of 1825 or spring of 1826, Rev. Walker asked them to help manage the mission.[28] They moved north and James Walker became the general manager of the mission farm; Jane Walker became the head teacher of the mission school. They continued to fill these positions until the mission closed in 1828. James brought a horse mill with them, which was set up at the mission. Later the mill became the first mill at Walker's Grove, near the present town of Plainfield.

In the fall of 1826, Rev. Walker's brother, Dr. David Walker, moved north from St. Clair County, Illinois and settled near the mouth of the Fox River.

Robert Beresford remained at the mission for a while after the buildings were completed to help maintain them, and teach in the school. Henry Allen was the first head teacher. He probably left about the time Jane Walker was appointed head teacher. When Henry left, he returned to the first mission site and moved into one of the two cabins constructed in the summer of 1825. In 1828, he donated the use of one of the cabins for the first school in Ottawa.[29] The other members of the missionary party apparently left upon completion of the mission buildings and establishment of the mission farm.

The Potawatomi were migratory and suspicious of the missionaries' motives. Consequently they were reluctant to accept their religion and values and the number of Indians converted to Christianity was small. Based on the missionaries' objectives, to Christianize and educate the Indians, the results were discouraging, and continuing to keep the mission open did not seem warranted.

Rev. Walker remained in charge until Rev. Isaac Scarritt was appointed to replace him in the fall of 1828. Rev. Scarritt's role was to close the mission and wrap up mission affairs. In 1830, Rev. Stephen Ruddel Beggs was appointed agent by the Methodist Conference to dispose of the mission property and settle its accounts.[30]

While the missionary's original objectives were not achieved, the mission's greatest legacy was the impact it had on the development of the surrounding area. The fact that the mission was established undoubtedly accelerated the settlement of the immediate area.    

Kendall County's First Families


Frederic H. Countryman, who had married an Indian woman, settled in Kendall County before any other white men. By the time Rev. Isaac Scarritt was sent to the mission in the fall of 1828, Pierce Hawley, Edmund Weed, and Robert Beresford were living in Hawley's Grove.[31],[32] In about 1829, Edmund Weed's brother-in-law, Vetal Vermette and his family joined the Beresford, Hawley and Weed families in Hawley's Grove. In February 1830, Walter Selvey arrived in Kendall County, and Bailey Hobson and his family arrived there September 21, 1830. In addition to these families, by 1830 bachelor William Parcell was living in the same grove. Countryman, Beresford, Parcell, and Hobson did not hold title to the land they lived on but were there by virtue of their "claim" to the land based on their early arrival and improvements made.    

John Dougherty purchased Beresford's claim, which was the east 1/2 of the northeast 1/4 of section 31, and subsequently obtained title to the land. Vetal Vermette owned the west 1/2 of the northeast 1/4 of section 31 Big Grove Township. Walter Selvey, Edmund Weed and Pierce Hawley owned land in section 30, the first section north of section 31. Walter Selvey owned the southeast 1/4 of section 30 of Big Grove Township. Edmund Weed owned 127.87 acres in the southwest quarter of section 30, and Pierce Hawley owned the east 1/2 of the northwest 1/4 of section 30.

Frederic H. Countryman lived north of Hawley's Grove in Title Grove, subsequently renamed Kellogg's Grove. Bailey Hobson and his family held a claim six miles north of Hawley's Grove in the Newark timber.

By the time of the 1830 census, eight families, or head of households were living in the southwest part of the county.[33] In addition to these settlers, French-Canadian, Peter Piche Specie, and Stephen Sweet of New York were living on the south end of a grove in Kendall Township known as Specie Grove.[34]

Robert Beresford Family


According to Robert Beresford's son, John William, the Beresford and Pierce Hawley families were the first to settle in Kendall County.[35] The site selected was about three miles from the mission near the grove now called Holderman's Grove.[36]

In time, Robert Beresford sold his claim to John Dougherty II. The precise date of the sale is unknown, but Robert had left Kendall County before August 1830 when he was enumerated in the area that became La Salle County.[37] Following the sale of his claim to John Dougherty, II, Robert purchased a farm, later known as the Belrose farm, near Wedron in Dayton Township, La Salle County. Robert and his son John William Beresford farmed there until about 1843 when Robert sold the farm and purchased another farm about a mile north on higher ground. This farm was located along Indian Creek in what became Serena Township and the Beresford family became the first settlers of that township. Robert and John W. improved this farm and for several years ran a water-powered sawmill on Indian Creek. Robert and his wife Mary Beresford remained in Serena Township until their deaths. Both were enumerated there in 1840 and Robert was enumerated there in 1850.

Robert Beresford was born April 15, 1782 in County Derry, Ireland. Robert's ancestors were of Scottish and English ancestry. Robert's father and grandfather both had positions with the British Government in Northern Ireland, which became his place of birth. In about 1820, Robert brought his family to America, first settling in Columbiana County, Ohio. In about 1822 or 1823 the Beresford family moved to the area around Fort Clark, Illinois.[38]

Robert died November 28, 1852 in Serena Twp, La Salle County and is buried in Northville Cemetery, Northville Township, La Salle County. His wife, Mary (Disert) Beresford, was born May 24, 1791 in Ireland. She died February 18, 1844 in Serena Township and is buried beside her husband in Northville Cemetery.

Robert and Mary had at least two sons and four daughters. Three of their children lived, in Kendall County.

Their eldest son, James Beresford was born in County Derry, Ireland about 1813. Both James and his brother John William were privates in Captain George McFadden's company of Mounted Volunteers during the Black Hawk War. Indians killed James during the war on June 24, 1832 near Wedron, La Salle County. Two young Indians were indicted by the La Salle County Grand Jury for his murder but when the suspects came to trial they were acquitted. There is a gravestone in Northville Cemetery with James Beresford's name on, but this is probably a memorial stone rather than his actual gravesite. 

John William Beresford was born in County Derry, Ireland, December 30, 1816. John married Mary Ann Cargill November 3, 1842. Three children were born to John and Mary. Theron James Beresford was born April, 12, 1844 in La Salle County, and died February 19, 1915 in Corning, Tehama County, California. Theron J. married Ruhama Brunson. She was born May 5, 1846 in Northville Township, La Salle County, Illinois and died April 2, 1935 in Corning, California. Theretta Edna Beresford was born about 1848 in La Salle County, and died in 1880 in California. Willis Virgil Beresford was born June, 1, 1855 in Illinois. He died unmarried February 23, 1943 in Corning, California.

In 1850, John William and Mary Ann were living next door to his father in Serena Township on what was known as the Temple farm. Robert Beresford's associate, James Ferguson was living with John's family.

In 1855, John sold his farm and moved to the new town of Amboy, Lee County, Illinois. John immediately became interested in the organization of the town and served on the first town board. When he moved to Amboy, he opened a lumber business which was a natural extension of the lumber production and marketing he and his father were engaged in while in Serena Township. Later he entered the dry goods and grocery business with two partners.

John's first wife, Mary Ann Cargill, died in Amboy October 11 1857. In 1859, he married Miss Kittie Depew Peck at Bloomington, McLean County, Illinois. Three children were born to this marriage; Charles Depew  who died in 1865, Fred Grant  born October 20, 1864 in Nebraska and died February 1, 1922 in Corning, Tehama County, California, and Mary Della  born January 8, 1873 and died unmarried July 3, 1957 in Corning, California. Fred Grant married Nellie Victoria Kelsey, April 23, 1895 at Rock Springs, Sweet Water County, Wyoming. Nellie was born November 17, 1867 in New York and died January 29, 1955 in Butte County, California. Fred G and Nellie V. had a son named Harold K. born February 13, 1898 in California, and died July 23, 1965 in Tehama County, California. It is unknown if Willis Virgil married.

In the spring of 1863 John and his family moved to California traveling overland by wagons. He remained in California for two years before returning to Nebraska via the Isthmus of Panama. In 1870 John W and his son Willis V. were enumerated in Sheridan, Washington County, Nebraska.[39] John's second wife died February 6, 1878 at Fremont, Dodge County, Nebraska and is buried in Ridge Cemetery at that place.

John William Beresford lived at Fremont until 1882 when he returned to Amboy, Illinois and opened a jewelry store. He died at his home in Amboy, January 26, 1903 and is buried in Prairie Repose Cemetery, Amboy. He was survived by his sister Mary Ann Cullen of Ottawa, Illinois and four of his children, Willis Virgil, and Mary Della of Amboy, Theron James of Ceresco, Saunders County, Nebraska, and Fred of Corning, Tehama County, California.

In 1825, a daughter was born to the Robert Beresford family shortly after the Beresford cabin was erected on the south side of the Illinois River in La Salle County, Illinois.[40] The child only lived two or three months and was buried near their cabin home. This was probably the first birth and death of a white child in La Salle County.

Lovina Beresford was born October 6, 1828 at the Indian mission in La Salle County while the family was living in Big Grove Township. Lovina married Rev. Alphonso D. Wyckoff (A. D.), January 25, 1852 in La Salle County.[41] A. D. was the son of Asher and Amarilla Wyckoff. He was born in Brown County, Ohio June 17, 1830. According to Lovina's obituary, A. D. Wyckoff was licensed to preach by the Fox River Union. His first charge was the Congregational Church in Bruce Township, La Salle County.[42]

At the time of the 1860 census the family was living in Farm Ridge Township, La Salle County where A. D.'s occupation was listed as Methodist minister. A. D. attended Wheaton College for four years and was ordained in the Congregational Church in 1863. April 11, 1864 he enlisted as Chaplain in the Sixty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served in this capacity until the end of the war and was discharged July 11, 1865. Following his discharge, he returned to Illinois and served as minister in several places until giving up the ministry in 1872 because of failing eyesight. In 1870 the Wyckoff family was enumerated in Chebanse, Iroquois County, Illinois.[43] In 1880 they were enumerated in Roberts, Ford County, Illinois. Shortly after the 1880 census was taken they moved to York, York County, Nebraska. A. D. purchased a pharmacy in York where he erected two store buildings facing the public square. He became a prominent businessman and was elected mayor of York in 1888.

Lovina died January 30, 1890 in York, Nebraska. In 1893, Alphonso married Sarah M. (Harrison) McGraw. In 1894 they moved to Escondido, San Diego County, California where they were enumerated in 1900 and 1910.

Mary Ann Beresford was born December 6, 1829 on the Belrose farm in Dayton Township, La Salle County. She married William Cullen March 3, 1852 in La Salle County. The Cullen family lived on a farm in Adams Township, La Salle County until 1865 when they moved to Ottawa.

William was born in Northern Ireland, March 4, 1826. He was the son of James and Jane (Cassidy) Cullen natives of Northern Ireland. When the Cullen family immigrated to America they located at Pittsburg, PA. In 1846, William convinced the family to move west to the northern part of La Salle County and try farming. He successfully followed the occupation of a farmer for eighteen years and also served as a Deputy Sheriff.

In 1856, William helped organize the Republican Party by attending the county and state conventions as a delegate. He continued to be an active Republican until his death.

In 1864 he was elected Sheriff of La Salle County on the Republican ticket and moved his family to Ottawa, IL. When his term a Sheriff was completed he purchased a half interest in the Ottawa Republican and served as senior editor of that paper. In 1880 and 1882 he was elected a Member of Congress serving two, two-year terms. 

Seven children were born to William and Mary Ann. Daughters Florence Cullen, Josephine Cullen and two others died in infancy. Three of their children were alive in 1886. Their son, Charles Sumner Cullen, was an attorney in Ottawa. Daughters, Genoa A. Cullen and Flora H. Cullen were living at home.[44]

Mary Ann died October 7, 1905 in Ottawa. Her husband William Cullen died January 17, 1914 in Ottawa. Both are buried in Ottawa Avenue Cemetery.

Jane Beresford was born in 1832 in La Salle County. She died in Serena Township, La Salle County in 1846 and is buried beside her parents in Northville Cemetery.

Frederic H. Countryman Family

a. k. a. Frederic Contraman

According to census data, Frederic H. Countryman was born about 1795. No information was given regarding his wife or children's ages. Frederic Countryman was listed on an 1823 Michilimackinac County, Michigan voter list.[45]

Frederic married a Potawatomi woman named En-do-ga and spoke the language fluently. The Countryman family lived north of Hawley's Grove in Title Grove subsequently renamed Kellogg's Grove. Their homes were a log cabin on the edge of a slough and a bark wigwam in the middle of the grove.[46]

At the June 8, 1825 session of the Peoria county Commissioner's Court, Frederic Countryman was appointed Constable. Because of his friendship with the Indians and his knowledge of the Potawatomi language he probably was an ideal choice for the office.

Frederic and En-do-ga had three daughters, Betsey Countryman, Nancy Countryman, and Sarah Countryman. Their ages are unknown to the compiler but they apparently were young girls when they were collectively awarded a section of land joining the reserves near Rock Village.[47]

Such grants were generally made in payment for service rendered to the U. S. Government, or for a loss of personal property. The Countryman girl's grant was probably related to their father's service to the Government and the Indians.[48]

Early in 1831, Daniel Kellogg purchased Frederic Countryman's claim. At this time a large number of Potawatomi Indians were living in Paw Paw Grove in western De Kalb and eastern Lee County. After the sale of his claim, Countryman and his family moved to Paw Paw Grove. In the spring of 1831, he returned to Kendall County seeking someone to help break the prairie sod so the Indians could raise corn. George Havenhill assigned his fifteen year old son, Fielding Havenhill, the task of gathering up several yoke of oxen from the prairie and driving them with wagon and plow to Paw Paw Grove to break the sod for the Indians.[49]

In early 1834, the Indians living around Paw Paw Grove were moved to the Potawatomi Indian Reservation in Calhoun County, Kansas and the Countryman family moved west with them.[50]

Frederic Countryman was enumerated in the Kansas Territorial Censuses of 1855 and 1857. In 1855, Frederic H. Countryman was listed as a 60-year-old male who had emigrated from Illinois. No other information was given. In the 1857 census, Frederic H. was listed as the head of a family with 2 males and three females. The Countryman home was on the Potawatomi Indian Reservation south of the Military Road leading from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Riley.[51]  The census enumerator indicated the majority of those enumerated with the Countryman family lived in the immediate vicinity of R. C. Miller's Trading House one mile west of Soldier Creek, KS.[52][53][54]

It is unknown whether Frederic died shortly after the 1857 census or moved somewhere else, perhaps to the Indian Territory, present day Oklahoma.

According to Rev. Hicks, Frederic's wife, En-do-ga left him about 1832 and died of small pox at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[55]

John Dougherty II Family


John Dougherty, II, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Dougherty, Sr. who were Quakers. John, II was born about 1788 in Knob Lick, Metcalf County, Kentucky. John, Sr., was born about 1743 in Forks of James River, Rockbridge County Virginia.

John, II married Mary Hollowell February 11, 1810 in Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana. Mary was the daughter of Quakers John Hollowell and Miriam (Overman) Hollowell. John Hollowell died February 6, 1855 in Orange County, Indiana. Miriam (Overman) Hollowell was born June 1, 1764 in Wayne County, North Carolina and died in April 1807 in the same place.

Mary (Hollowell) Dougherty was born February 26, 1792 in Wayne County, North Carolina. Other researchers believe she died March 18, 1855 in Knox County, Illinois but the compiler has been unable to verify this.

John Dougherty, II and his father were among the earliest settlers of Orange County, Indiana purchasing land there in 1812, 1813 and 1816. John Dougherty, Sr. died in Orange County, February 22, 1828.

John Dougherty, II, left Indiana shortly after the death of his father. About 1829, he purchased Robert Beresford's claim in Big Grove Township. While traveling through Kendall County in 1831, Juliette Kinzie met a man she identified as Mr. Dogherty, who probably was John Dougherty, II. She described him as a tall; ramrod straight man dressed in Quaker attire whose religious beliefs were half Quaker and half Methodist.[56]

According to the 1830 census, the Dougherty family consisted of John, his wife, four sons, and three daughters. John Dougherty, II and his wife had eight known children. Their oldest child, George W. Dougherty, was born March 11, 1811 in Jefferson County, Kentucky and died October 5, 1895 in Chambersburg, Orange County, Indiana. He married Sarah L. Campbell November 16, 1832 in Lawrence County, Indiana and did not come to Kendall County with the rest of the family. The following seven children were in Kendall County at the time of the 1830 census.

Catherine Dougherty was born May 4, 1813 in Orange County, Indiana. She was the first wife of Jesse Hobson born January 26, 1812 in Randolph County, North Carolina. Jesse was the son of Bailey Hobson's older brother Nathan Harvey Hobson and his wife Rebecca (Freeman) Hobson. Jesse and Catherine were married April 6, 1835 in Cook County, Illinois. Catherine died December 14, 1855 at Farmington, Davis County, Utah and is buried at Farmington. Jesse died June 18, 1883 at Oxford, Bannock County, Idaho and is buried at Richmond, Cache County, Utah.

Ann Dougherty was born September 1, 1814 in Orange County, Indiana. She married Walter Selvey December 15, 1831 in La Salle County. Ann died March 9, 1888 and is buried in Spring Lake Memorial Cemetery, Aurora, Kane County, Illinois. At the time of her death she was a resident of South Englewood, now part of Chicago.

Levi Dougherty was born January 20, 1816 in Orange County, Indiana. Levi married (1) Mary Ann Clark April 3, 1842. He married (2) Abigail Shaffer, February 13, 1859 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Levi's date of death is unknown but he was alive in 1879 and not found in the 1880 census. He died in Vernal, Uintah County, Utah and is buried in Vernal City Cemetery, Vernal Utah.

John Dougherty, III was born December 15, 1818 in Orange County, Indiana, and was said to have died about 1864. His place of death is unknown to the compiler.

Nathan Dougherty was born March 3, 1820 in Orange County, Indiana. Nathan married Lydia Ann Richards. He died July 13, 1899 in Waldport, Lincoln County, Oregon. At the time of the 1880 census he was living with his son John at Bald Hills, Humboldt County, California

Henry Dougherty was born March 29 1822 in Orange County, Indiana. One version has it that Henry died unmarried in March 1837. Another version is that Henry married Julia Philadelphia Hobson, who was born April 7, 1825 in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana. His place of death is unknown to the compiler.

Miriam Dougherty was born August 26, 1828 in Orange County, Indiana. She married George W. Clark March 27, 1842 and was living in Anaheim, Los Angeles County, California at the time of the 1880 census. Miriam is supposed to have died about 1888. Her place of death is unknown to the compiler but a reasonable guess would be Anaheim, California.

November 16, 1831, John, II sold his eighty acres to Abraham Holderman and moved to Aux Sable Grove where he took up a new claim west of Waish-kee-shaw's Reservation in section 1 of Kendall Township. John's claim was about a mile northwest of his son-in-law Walter Selvey's NaAuSay Township claim. Walter's claim included both timber and prairie ground and Walter farmed the prairie ground. John, II's claim was in the thickest part of the forest. It had a fine spring, known locally as the "Big Spring." John, II proceeded to build a log house beside the spring and to clear a field in the nearby timber. What an awesome task it must have been to clear the huge native black walnut and burr oaks that existed then. According to his neighbor, Smith G. Minkler, John cleared a field between five and ten acres in size. His field was still well defined sixty years later and was known locally as "The Slashing" which was then part of a timber lot owned by Edmund Seely and Charles Cherry.

According to Rev. Hicks, John Dougherty, II lived in Kendall Township a few years and then moved on to Oregon.[57] No evidence was found to confirm Hick's belief but it was confirmed that his son Nathan lived in Oregon at one time.

Other researchers believe John, II died in Knox County, Illinois January 2, 1856 but nothing has been found to confirm that the John Dougherty, II who died in Knox County was John Dougherty, II of Kendall County.

James Ferguson


It is believed that James Ferguson came to northern Illinois with Robert Beresford.[58] James was associated with Robert Beresford in some unknown fashion. It is thought by some that he was Robert's brother-in-law, perhaps he was, but it does not appear Mary Beresford was his sister as her maiden name was Disert. Whatever the relationship, friend, relative, or employee, James seems to have been closely connected to the Beresford family.

At the time of the 1850 census, James was living in the John W. Beresford household in Serena Township, La Salle County, Illinois. He was enumerated as a 48 year old farm laborer born in Ireland. James died March 3, 1854 in La Salle Township, La Salle County, Illinois.

Aaron Hawley Family


Aaron Hawley and his family were part of the missionary party.[59] It is unknown where Aaron went upon leaving the mission, but by 1827 he was in the Fever River district in northwestern Illinois mining lead. His family joined him there in 1828. By 1832, Aaron's family was living in southern Wisconsin while he was living on a stock farm near the Pecatonic River in present-day Winnebago County, Illinois. When the Black Hawk War broke out in the spring of 1832, Aaron decided to join his family in Wisconsin. For security reasons he joined a group of seven men to make the trip. On May 24, 1832, about 30 of Black Hawk's warriors attacked the group near the hamlet of Kent, Kent Township, Stephenson County, Illinois, about 35 miles southeast of Galena and 37 miles north of Dixon. Four of the men were killed, including Aaron Hawley.[60]

Pierce Hawley Family

 

Pierce Hawley was born November 14, 1789 in Vergennes, Addison County, Vermont. He was the son of Gideon Hawley and Lavinia (Darrah) Hawley. In maturity he was described as a man who was six feet tall in his stocking feet who stood straight, and was well proportioned.

Pierce's father, Gideon, was born July 20, 1762 in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut. He left Bridgeport and became a landowner and resident of Ferrisburg, Vermont. During the War of 1812, Gideon was a Captain in the American army. Three of his sons served in the company he commanded, Isaac M. Hawley was a Lieutenant, Pierce Hawley was a Sergeant, and George Hawley was a Private. Gideon died about 1813 near Montreal, Canada of wounds sustained in the Battle of Plattsburg, New York.

Pierce's mother, Lavinia, was born about 1765 on the Isle of Man. She died in about 1844 on the boat General Brooks on the way to La Crosse, Wisconsin during a Mormon migration. She was taken ashore at Potosi, Grant County, Wisconsin and left with members of the local Masonic Lodge for burial, because the group did not wish to stop long enough for a funeral.

Gideon and Lavinia's children lived in Ferrisburg, Vermont until they reached maturity. When twenty-seven years of age, Pierce moved to White County in southeastern Illinois.[61] While living there, Pierce married Sarah Schrader July 4, 1822 in Lawrence County, Illinois. Sarah was born June 3, 1800 in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee the daughter of Jacob Schrader and Mary (Wolfe) Schrader. Jacob was a native of Germany and Mary a native of Pennsylvania. Pierce and Sarah continued to live in White County for a short time after their marriage.

In 1820, Pierce Hawley was enumerated in White County.[62] At the same time, his brother, Aaron Hawley, was enumerated in Madison County, Illinois across the Mississippi River from St. Louis.[63] By March 1825, both brothers were living in Peoria County where the appeared on a list of voters.        

According to John W. Beresford, Pierce moved his family to Kendall County in the fall of 1825.[64] The site selected for their home was near a large grove of timber about three miles east of the mission site. The grove was originally called Hawley's Grove but is now known as Holderman's Grove.

Pierce entered the east half of the northwest quarter, section 30, Big Grove Township, November 26, 1829. November 16, 1831, he sold his eighty acres to Abraham Holderman and moved near his daughter Caroline and her husband Willard Scott in Du Page County.

Pierce Hawley was frequently on the move, he moved twelve times during the last six years of his life. His youngest son, Gideon Hawley, indicated his father moved often because he was infatuated with living on the frontier.

In 1837, Pierce became a Mormon, and was a fervent advocate of Mormonism. Most of his children converted to Mormonism but his eldest daughter Caroline (Hawley Scott is believed to have been an exception.

After his conversion to Mormonism, Pierce went to Missouri to help other Mormons move out of the state because of the religious intolerance they experienced. An early church history stated Pierce was a resident of Caldwell and Ray counties, Missouri during this period. Pierce and Sarah's son, John Pierce Hawley, was baptized in 1837 in Ray County. On the Missouri Petition, dated May 6, 1839, Pierce stated he had been held prisoner in Missouri and sustained damages in the amount of $3280.50.[65]

In about 1839 Pierce and his family moved to Lee County, Iowa where they were enumerated in the 1840 census.[66] Lee County is directly across the Mississippi River from the Mormon center, Hancock County, Illinois. They remained there until about 1844 when they moved to Black River Falls, Wisconsin. They lived there one year before moving to Texas in about 1845 and remained there until 1853. In 1850 Pierce's family was living in Zodiac Township, Gillespie County, Texas.[67] In 1853, Pierce and Sarah moved to the Territory of Kansas. The following years were spent living there and in the Indian Territory until Pierce died August 16, 1858 in Cherokee Nation, Arkansas.

Pierce and Sarah Hawley had ten children; six of their children lived in Kendall County.

Mary Hawley was born September 1, 1823 in Illinois. Mary became the first plural wife of Lyman Wight.[68] The Wight family moved to Texas after the murder of the Prophet Joseph Smith, Sr. by a mob at Carthage, Illinois in 1844. They lived for brief periods in Travis, Gillespie and Bandera Counties, Texas.[69] Mary (Hawley) Wight died in Bandera, Bandera County, Texas in January 1852.

George Hawley was born September 14, 1824 in La Salle County. A biography of George's life was found where he stated he was born in Sangamon County, Illinois.[70] George's statement was not incorrect but was also not very descriptive in pinpointing where he was born. Prior to the organization of Peoria County in 1825, all of the territory in northern Illinois was part of Sangamon County. The evidence indicates the Hawley family lived in the area that became Peoria County as opposed to Sangamon as presently constituted.[71] When Peoria County was formed, all of the unorganized territory north of Peoria County was attached to Peoria County for court purposes and voting, including the area that became La Salle and Kendall Counties.    

George married (1) Janet Conde, date and place unknown. He married (2) Ann Hadfield, July 4, 1846 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. Ann was born April 14, 1830 in England and was the daughter of Samuel Hadfield and Mary A. Hadfield. Ann died September 16, 1887 in Shelby County, Iowa.

George and Ann had eleven children, Martha Hawley, George C. Hawley, Mary L. Hawley, Maroni Hawley, Gideon M. Hawley, Rosina Hawley, Sarah Hawley, Isaac L. Hawley, Joseph Hawley, Lillian E. Hawley and William Hawley. George Hawley earned his living by carpentry. He moved about the country with his parents and siblings; living in Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Wisconsin, Texas, Indian Territory, and Utah. George Hawley lived in Texas until about 1854 when he moved to the Cherokee Nation.[72] He remained there for two years building sawmills. In 1856 he moved to Utah Territory settling in Pine Valley, Washington County where he operated a sawmill and lumber business. He was also engaged in the manufacture of looms, spinning wheels and reels. In 1870 he moved to Grove Township, Shelby County, Iowa and became a farmer.[73] In 1900, he was residing with his son Gideon M. Hawley in Blue Township, Jackson County, Missouri.[74] George Hawley died July 20, 1905 in Holden, Johnson County, Missouri. 

John Pierce Hawley was born March 24, 1826 in La Salle County. He was baptized in the Mormon Church in July 1837 in Ray County, Missouri. John P. Hawley married Sylvia Johnson July 4, 1846. Their children were born in Indian Territory, Utah, and Iowa.[75] In 1880, John P. and his family were living at Grove, Shelby County, Iowa.[76] John P. died April 17, 1909 at Lamoni, Decatur County, Iowa while attending a conference of the Reorganized Church of LDS.

Aaron Hawley was born in about 1827 in La Salle County.[77] Aaron married (1) Elizabeth Ann Andrews, January 1, 1853 in Bandera, Bandera County, Texas. He married (2) Elizabeth A. Crandall May 3, 1861 in Shelby, Shelby County, Iowa. Elizabeth A. was born about 1840 in Illinois.[78] Aaron died October 2, 1870 in Shelby, Iowa.

William Schrader Hawley was born December 20, 1829 in Kendall County.[79] William S. Hawley married Nancy Sebrina Matheny November 15, 1855 at Deseret, Millard County, Utah. William S. and Nancy had children born in Nebraska and Utah. In 1880, they were living at Fillmore, Millard County, Utah.[80] William S. Hawley died May 29, 1893 in Oasis, Millard County, Utah.

Priscilla Hawley was born in Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois November 9, 1831. Priscilla married John Young July 4, 1846. They had children born in Texas, Indian Territory, and Iowa. In 1880, John and Priscilla were living at Grove, Shelby County, Iowa.[81] Priscilla died January 26, 1927; her place of death is unknown to the compiler.

Pierce and Sarah's four youngest children did not live in Kendall County. Isaac Hawley was born December 14, 1833. On the 1880 census, he stated he was born in Missouri. Pierce and his family were living in Ray County, Missouri at the time of his birth. Isaac married (1) Amelia Charlotte Matheny April 4, 1857 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, and (2) Mrs. Emily Blackburn. In 1880, Isaac, Emily and their children were living in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, California. Isaac Hawley died in California, the date and place of his death is unknown to the compiler.

Henry Hawley was born about 1835, probably in Missouri. However, his place of birth on the 1850 census was Illinois, when he was enumerated as Pierce and Sarah's fourteen-year-old son living in Gillespie County, Texas.[82] He is said to have died in the Indian Territory. Precisely, when and where is unknown to the compiler.

Lavinia Hawley was born about 1838, probably in Missouri. She is supposed to have died in infancy.

Gideon Hawley was born April 21, 1842 in Lee County, Iowa.[83] After her husband Pierce's death, Sarah Hawley lived with her son Gideon. In 1861, Gideon and his mother returned to Iowa, settling in Grove Township, Shelby County. In 1880, she was living with Gideon in Union Township, Shelby County. In 1878, Sarah was living on a farm near Dowville, Iowa when she applied for a widow's pension based on Pierce's service in the War of 1812. At the time of her death, December 24, 1894 she was living with Gideon near Earling, Shelby County, Iowa.  

Gideon married Mary C. Holcomb March 28, 1864. She was born December 15, 1842 in Ashtabula County, Ohio, the daughter of O. E. Holcomb and Sallie Holcomb. Gideon and Mary C. were the parents of six children, all born in Iowa, Lavinia Hawley, Nellie J. Hawley, Priscilla Adele Hawley Willard A. Hawley, Carl Harman Hawley and Chloe C. Hawley.

By 1879, Gideon had sold his property in Grove Township and purchased 240 acres in Union Township, Shelby County, Iowa where they were enumerated in 1880[84] Gideon and his family was still residing there at the time of the 1900 census. Gideon died September 5, 1918; his place of death is unknown to the compiler.[85]

Several researchers credit Pierce Hawley and Sarah (Schrader) Hawley with having a daughter name Caroline born about 1840 in Naperville, Du Page County, Illinois. Caroline Hawley was born much earlier than 1840. In 1820, Pierce Hawley was enumerated in White County, Illinois. Three other people were living in his household. A female under 10 years of age thought to be Caroline Hawley who was born June 30, 1811 in Ferrisburgh, Addison County, Vermont. A female over 45 years of age thought to be Pierce's mother, Lavinia Hawley, born about 1765 and a male 16 to 26 years of age. The latter is thought to be Pierce's brother Gideon Hawley born August 13, 1797.

Pierce Hawley was born November 14, 1789, so would have been old enough to have a child born in 1811. However, he did not marry Sarah Schrader until July 22, 1822. Caroline was Pierce's daughter but the child of an earlier marriage. It is unknown to the compiler when Pierce's first wife died but she was out of the picture by the time of the 1820 census.

Caroline Hawley married Willard Scott, son of Stephen J. Scott. Willard was born April 20, 1808 at Unadilla, Otsego County, New York. He is credited with being the first white settler on the Du Page River in northeastern Illinois. He apparently made numerous trips to Peoria, stopping at the Hawley home on his way to and from Peoria, where he became acquainted with Caroline. In time, they agreed to become married. As the date of their marriage approached, Willard went to Peoria where he obtained two marriage licenses, one for he and Caroline, and another for his sister Permelia Scott and John K. Clarke. Rev. Isaac Scarrett, a missionary of the Methodist Episcopal Church, married both couples, July 21, 1829 at the Hawley home in Holderman's Grove. These were the first two weddings in Kendall County.[86][87] According to Willard's obituary the bridal journey was made by horseback from Holderman's Grove to their home in northern Will County. They spent the first night of their married life under a large tree near Plainfield, Illinois.

Caroline (Hawley) Scott died September 29, 1888 and is buried in Naperville Cemetery, Du Page County, Illinois. Her husband Willard died September 13, 1892 and is buried in the same cemetery.

Baly, Baley, Bailey Hobson Family


The correct spelling of the current subject's given name is uncertain. In 1820 Baley Hobson was listed as a white male inhabitant above the age of 21 years living in Orange County, Indiana. On his marriage record he was identified as Baly Hobson. On his gravestone in Naperville Cemetery his given name is spelled Baly. In the 1830 census of Peoria County and attached territory, his name was spelled Bailey. The latter spelling is the most typical spelling in later references.

Bailey Hobson was a Quaker. He was born April 30, 1798 in Jefferson County, Tennessee, son of John H. Hobson and Lydia (Harvey) Hobson.[88] Bailey Hobson died March 25, 1850 in Lisle Township, Du Page County.

Bailey's father, John H. Hobson was born January 13, 1765 in Snow Camp, Orange County, North Carolina and died March 25 1836 in Orange County, Indiana. His mother Lydia was born May 31, 1761 in Virginia and died July 9, 1803 in Snow Camp, Orange County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of Michael Harvey, Sr. and Elizabeth (Cheney) Harvey.

According to Indiana marriage records, Baly Hobson married Clerecy Straud (sic Clarissa Stroud?), March 9, 1821 in Orange County. Other researchers have determined Bailey's wife's maiden name was Clarissa Stewart. There is circumstantial evidence to support this hypothesis. Lewis Stewart accompanied Bailey on his trip to Illinois. Bailey and Clarissa named one of the sons William Stewart Hobson. Stewart could have been used because it was Clarissa's maiden name. However, William Stewart could have been named in honor of Bailey's good friend and companion, Lewis Stewart.

Other researchers have concluded Clarissa was the daughter of Lazarus Stewart and Polly (Boyd) Stewart. The name recorded on Bailey and Clarissa's marriage record may have been her married name from an earlier marriage. Clarissa was born in Georgia December 13, 1804, and died May 27, 1884 in Naperville, Du Page County, Illinois.

Bailey and Clarissa's first five children were born in Indiana, probably in Orange County. The following Hobson children lived in Kendall County.

Mary Ann Polly Hobson was born Oct 10, 1822. She died December 12, 1837 in Lisle Township, Du Page County, Illinois.

John Harvey Hobson was born January 5, 1824. John was a Du Page County Supervisor in 1861 and a soldier during the Civil War. He married first, Charlotte E. Royce, December 12, 1845 in Will County, IL. Charlotte died October 4, 1854. They had a son named Baley Hobson who died at one year of age August 24, 1847. Their second child, a daughter named Emma Hobson was born November 18, 1848 and died in Oregon in 1939. Their daughter Celia Hobson, whose date of birth is unknown to the compiler, married Joseph Ward and lived in Sioux Falls, SD.

John H. Hobson married second, Harriet E. Frazier, born about 1830. They had two daughters. Gertrude E. Hobson, who was born June 20, 1861, married J. D. Meisinger. Gertrude died September 6, 1893 and is buried in Naperville Cemetery. Their daughter Clara H. Hobson was born May 22, 1867 and died unmarried November 24, 1887. She is also buried in Naperville Cemetery. John H. died March 28, 1896 in Du Page County, and is buried in Naperville Cemetery.

William Stewart Hobson was born March 11, 1826 and died unmarried October 25, 1847 in Lisle Township, Du Page County, and is buried in Naperville Cemetery.

Oliver Cromwell Hobson was born February 3, 1828 and died unmarried November 18, 1847 in Lisle Township Du Page County, and is buried in Naperville Cemetery.

Nancy Jane Hobson was born about 1829. She died unmarried in 1906.

Bailey and Clarissa had seven additional children while living in Lisle Township, Du Page County.

Elizabeth Hobson was born August 16, 1832. She married Edmund Elliot Page January 1, 1852 in Du Page County. Edmund E. was born December 29, 1827 and died May 3, 1896. He is buried in Naperville Cemetery. They had two sons and a daughter. Albert Page was born about 1853 and died July 2, 1927; Willie Page died at three years of age, and Ethel Page who died September 26, 1860 at about one year of age. Elizabeth Hobson died January 19, 1889 and is buried in Naperville Cemetery.

Merritt Sylvester Hobson was born August 6, 1834. He married Elmira Kentner July 10, 1857 in Mahoning County, Ohio. They had two sons, Bailey Hobson born in 1858 and died in 1910, and Clayton Hobson born in 1861 and died unmarried in 1930. Merritt S. Hobson died January 9, 1867 in Ottumwa, IA. Merritt S. was a 1st Lt. in Company K, 13th IL Infantry Regiment.

Martha Hobson was born August 30, 1836. She married William R. Cody March 11, 1854, in Du Page County. Martha died June 28, 1855. No children were born to this union.

Elvira Hobson was born November 23, 1838. She married John Richard Haight, April 10, 1862 in Du Page County. They had a son, named Halley born January 16, 1863 who died May 3, 1911. Their daughter, Mabel Haight was born November 13, 1868 and died unmarried January 27, 1897. Their daughter, Elizabeth Ann Haight was born April 18, 1871 and died June 3, 1904. Their son, John R. Haight was born September 24, 1876 and died January 25, 1925. Elvira (Hobson) Haight died March 21, 1917.

Charlotte Hobson was born July 15, 1841. She married David M. Haight  (D. M.) March 17, 1863 in Du Page County. David M. and Charlotte moved to Oswego, Illinois in the 1880's where D. M. Haight was a prominent businessman for many years. No children were born to this marriage. Charlotte and D. M. continued to make Oswego their home until Charlotte's death in St. Charles Hospital, Aurora, Illinois February 4, 1911. Charlotte is buried next to her parents and other family members in Naperville Cemetery.

Ellen Hobson was born September 17, 1843. She married Levi W. Crossman July 9, 1874 in Du Page County. They had four children: Alice Rose Crossman, Shirley Crossman, William L. Crossman, and Catherine Crossman. Ellen died August 11, 1923 in Aurora, Kane County, Illinois.

Adele Hobson was born June 26 1846. One version has her dying unmarried in 1912. Another version has her marrying Merritt Cody.

Prior to his removal to Illinois, Bailey Hobson was living near the Ohio River in Orange County, Indiana. About the middle of May 1830, he started west on a scouting mission and made his way to the Illinois River, which he crossed on a ferry near the present site of Peru, Illinois. From there he made his way to Hawley's Grove, some four hundred miles from his home in Indiana. Five families were living in the grove at that time. Bailey immediately began looking for a site that met his criteria. He explored along the Du Page River as far north as Walker's Grove near Plainfield, Illinois and up the Fox River to Long Grove in Kendall Township. Bailey Hobson settled on a claim six miles north of Hawley's Grove in the timber below Newark. The claim was three miles east of the main Potawatomi Indian village on the Fox River. In order to perfect his claim, Bailey cut some logs to be used in the construction of a cabin before returning home to get his family. He arrived at his home in Indiana about July 1, 1830 and began making preparations for the return trip to Illinois.

On September 1, 1830, Bailey, his wife Clarissa Hobson three sons and two daughters started for their new home in Illinois. Bailey's friend, Lewis Stewart, who may have been his brother-in-law, accompanied them. Twenty-one days later they arrived at Hawley's Grove where they remained, according to Hicks, with the Vermette family until sometime in October before moving to their claim.[89][90]In the meantime, Bailey and Lewis Stewart, sowed some winter wheat, cut some slough hay to feed their cattle during the winter, and built a cabin on the claim. When they moved to their claim, the family lived in a tent until their cabin was ready to move into, which was about November 1, 1830.

Bailey's original destination seems to have been Hawley's Grove. Why Hawley's Grove? One possible answer is one of the first settlers at Hawley's Grove was John Dougherty. It is likely that Dougherty and Hobson knew each other in Orange County, Indiana. Both families were part of the Orange County, Quaker community. Bailey Hobson and John Daugherty (Dougherty) were both enumerated in the 1820 census of males in Orange County. Bailey's older brother Jesse would marry Catherine, daughter of John, II and Mary (Hollowell) Dougherty April 6, 1835.

On the return leg of his trip from Chicago to Peoria, census enumerator Augustus Langworthy found two more families in Kendall County, the John Dougherty, II and Bailey Hobson families.

Before moving to their claim about six miles north of Holderman's Grove, the Hobson family stayed for about three weeks with someone in Holderman's Grove. It seems more likely that it was the Dougherty family than the Vermette family.

As soon as his cabin was habitable, Bailey began to feel uneasy about his location. The closest mill was near Peoria, and he was a long way from supplies, and neighbors. As soon as his family was settled in their new home, he decided to explore the country further. He traveled up the Fox River to Specie's cabin and then across country to the Du Page River. After examining the locality he found a suitable mill site with good land around it. He decided the site suited his purposes better than the Kendall County claim and determined to abandon that claim and secure the new site for his home. In December, Hobson and Stewart returned to the new site and began cutting timber to build a cabin. The weather turned against them forcing them to give up their task and seek shelter in Willard Scott's cabin about three miles south of the Hobson claim. They remained there for two days, but the weather remained severe and they gave up and returned to the original claim.

In the spring, a hundred or more, Indians came into the grove near their claim and began to prepare the trees to gather sap to make sugar. Bailey became concerned about the large number of Indians nearby and made arrangements to send his family to Holderman's Grove where he had obtained permission to let the family stay for a few days while he moved their household goods to his new claim.[91] Shortly after Bailey abandoned his Kendall County claim, newcomer Clark Hollenback took it up.

When Bailey Hobson and Lewis Stewart reached the Du Page County claim, Willard Scott who had married Caroline Hawley, advised Bailey to bring his family and stay with them until their cabin was completed. He accepted his offer and the family remained with the Scott family a few days until the Hobson cabin was habitable. Their Du Page County cabin was occupied in March 1831.

Bailey Hobson is credited with being the first white settler in Du Page County. Willard Scott is credited with being the first white settler on the Du Page River. Scott's cabin was built several months before Hobson's but his cabin was just south of the Du Page County line in Will County.[92]

The Hobson's were millers and millwrights and Bailey became a successful mill operator. Bailey built three mills on the Du Page River. The first was a sawmill powered by a windmill. The second was a water-powered gristmill. In 1834, he built a third mill, also powered by water to meet the increased demand for millwork.[93][94] The place where the mills and their home were became known as Hobson's Mill. The Hobson home served as a tavern or inn for wayfarers and patrons of the mill who sometimes would stay for three or four days while their millwork was being done. The site of the mill and millrace are now preserved in Pioneer Park. The millstones have been set as a monument to the pioneers of Du Page County.  

William Parcell


Virtually nothing is known of William Parcell except that he was a bachelor. He was enumerated in the 1830 census of Putnam County, as a person born between 1800 and 1810.

Walter Selvey Family


Walter Selvey was born about 1801 in Maryland. In February 1830 he entered the southeast quarter of section 30, Big Grove Township. About half of his claim was in the grove with the remainder on the prairie.

December 15, 1831, Walter married Ann Dougherty, in La Salle County. Ann was born September 1, 1815 in Orange Co., Indiana and was the daughter of Walter's neighbors, John Dougherty and Mary (Hollowell) Dougherty.

In November 1831, Walter Selvey sold his 160 acres to Abraham Holderman. The sale was recorded Nov 14, 1831 and is the earliest sale of land in Kendall County. Following the sale, Walter took up a claim in parts of sections seven, eight and seventeen in NaAuSay Township near Waish-kee-shaw's Reservation. He is acknowledged to be the first permanent settler in NaAuSay Township.

In 1849 or 1850, the Selvey family moved to Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa where they are found on the 1850 census. While in Kendall County, Walter accumulated a considerable amount of land in NaAuSay and Oswego Townships. He continued to retain ownership of much of his Kendall County land while in Iowa. Sometime after 1850 several members of the Selvey family left Iowa and moved to Sacramento County, California. The family was not found in the 1860 census. In 1870, the Walter Selby (sic Selvey) family was in Hot Springs Township, Napa County, California.[95]

Eventually, most of the Selvey family members returned to the vicinity of Aurora, Illinois. Walter and Ann's known children are as follows.

Sarah Ann Selvey was born in April 1832 in Plainfield, Illinois. She married Francis W. McClellan April 3, 1856, in Kane County, Illinois. Francis W. McClellan was born October 31, 1831 the son of Robert and Eliza (Small) McClellan. Sarah Ann (Selvey) McClellan died May 31, 1859. She is buried in Spring Lake Cemetery, but her place of her death is unknown to the compiler.

Charles Perry Selvey was born May 21, 1837 in NaAuSay Township and died March 22, 1846 in NaAuSay or Oswego Township. In 1844,Walter Selvey gave Kendall County an acre of land in the northeast corner of Oswego Township to be used as a cemetery, which became known as Albee Cemetery.[96] Perry Selvey was the first person buried in Albee Cemetery but was subsequently moved to Spring Lake Cemetery to be buried with other family members.

George W., Selvey known as G. W. Selvey, was born June 20, 1834 in NaAuSay Township. In 1850, G. W. was living with the J. D. Vananken family in Tama County, Iowa. His occupation was listed as farmer. Given the value of his property, he did not appear to be working for the Vananken family but farming for himself. George W. W. died July 30 1866 in Aurora, Illinois and is buried in Spring Lake Cemetery.     

Mary P. Selvey was born December 15, 1835 in NaAuSay Township. She married Martin Woodruff, April 3, 1856 in Kane County, Illinois.[97] Mary P. and her sister Sarah Ann Selvey were married in a double wedding ceremony. Mary died October 31, 1864 in Aurora. She is buried in Spring Lake Cemetery. Her husband, Martin Woodruff, died February 12, 1904 in a railroad accident in Aurora. In 1870, Mary P. and Martin's sons, C. Woodruff, born about 1857, and Lester B. Woodruff, born about 1858 were enumerated with Walter and Ann in Napa County, California in 1870.

Ellen P. Selvey was born about July 1841in NaAuSay or Oswego Township. She died October 16, 1858 in Birmingham, state not given but probably Iowa, and is buried in Spring Lake Cemetery.   

Chester Selvey was born about 1844 in NaAuSay or Oswego Township. Chester married (Hettie?) who was born about 1843 in Iowa. In 1880, they were living in Birmingham, Van Buren County, Iowa. The date and place of his death is unknown to the compiler.

Emma E. Selvey was born in November 1846 in NaAuSay or Oswego Township. In 1880, she was visiting in her mother's household, in northeastern Bristol Township. Emma E. Selvey was living with her brother John L. Selvey at the time of the 1900 census of Cochise County, Arizona. The date and place of her death is unknown to the compiler.[98][99]

John L. Selvey was born in August 1848 in NaAuSay or Oswego Township. In 1870, John L. was living with his parents in Napa County, California. He was not found in the 1880 census. In 1900, John L. was single, a farmer, living with his unmarried sister Emma E. in Cochise County, Arizona. The place and date of his death is unknown to the compiler.

Ada Selvey was born October 2, 1850 in Oskaloosa, Iowa, and died September 3, 1936 in Sacramento, California. She married Alston Wilson Everts November 10, 1869 in Napa County, California. They had three children, Walter Everts, born about 1872 in California, Eva Lenore Everts, born September 20, 1875 in California, and Beth Everts, born in Napa, County California December 15, 1883.

Eva L. Selvey was born about 1853-4 in Illinois. She married John J. Sencenbaugh September 20, 1876, in Kane County, Illinois. In 1870 she was enumerated with her parents in Napa County, California. At the time of the 1880 census, she and her two-year-old son Wilber Sencenbaugh were living with her mother in Bristol Township. The place and date of her death is unknown to the compiler.

Anna I. Annie Selvey was born January 16, 1856, probably in Mahaska County, Iowa. She died August 14, 1867 in Sacramento County, California and is buried in Spring Lake Cemetery, Aurora, Illinois.

Walter Selby (sic Selvey) died October 28, 1876 in American Township,[100] California "aboard the cars" (train.)[101] According to probate records, Walter's body was shipped from Sacramento to Aurora, IL. Walter owned several lots in Spring Lake Cemetery. His wife and six of their children are buried in Spring Lake Cemetery but there is no record of Walter's burial there. However, it seems likely he was buried there with the other members of his family.

Ann (Dougherty) Selvey died March 9, 1888 in South Englewood, Illinois, now part of Chicago. She is buried in Spring Lake Memorial Cemetery in Aurora, Illinois

Peter Piche/Specie


The French-Canadian, known as Peter Lamsett, Peter Pecie/Piche and Peter Specie in Kendall County, originally was Pierre Marie Pichet DuPre Lamusette. He was born December 11, 1789 at Saint-Charles-sur-Richelieu Canada, son of Pierre Marie and Angelique Hudon Beaulieu Pichet DuPre Lamusette. As early as 1811 he was working along the St. Joseph River in Michigan with Joseph Bailly By 1825, he was an Indian trader and resident of Chicago, where his name appeared on the 1825 list of taxpayers living in the vicinity of Fort Dearborn. [102]

Peter Specie and his associate Stephen Sweet were not included in the 1830 census of Putnam County. Consequently, historians disagree on when they arrived in present-day Kendall County. Rev. Hicks believed they were in Kendall County by 1830. Others suggested they did not arrive until 1831, but there is evidence they were there as early as 1830. Bailey Hobson places Specie in Kendall County living in his completed cabin as early as December 1830.[103]

Juliette Kinzie, wife of John H Kinzie, wrote an account of their travels from Wisconsin to Chicago in March 1831. She wrote of spending the night in a tent in a grove the Indians called Big Woods or Piche's Grove after the Frenchman who lived there. The next morning the Kinzies broke camp and continued their journey toward Chicago. About mid-morning they came to Piche's cabin. Mrs. Kinzie described his home as a log cabin on a rise in the ground, facing the broad prairie to the east. Piche was not at home but the cabin was full of Indians and travelers.[104]

One of the people the Kinzies found in Piche's cabin was a man dressed in Quaker attire and named, according to Mrs. Kinzie, Mr. Dogherty. This was probably Kendall County resident John Dougherty, II then living in Big Grove Township. Dougherty was on his way to Chicago and Mr. Kinzie hired him to guide their party.

Specie (Piche) was a strong promoter of the county's virtues and successfully convinced others to settle in the county. He also provided an essential service to the settlers. Specie owned six yoke of oxen, a prairie plow, and a wagon, which he hired out to break the prairie and haul or move heavy objects for such as logs used in the construction of their homes and barns.

In the summer of 1835, Specie sold his claim and all his personal property to John Lee Clarke and his partner John Kittredge LeBarron for $2,000. After the sale he left Kendall County and moved to Felix Township, Grundy County, Illinois and settled near the village of Dresden. In 1897, this portion of Felix Township was spun off to create Goose Lake Township.

During his later years in life, Peter was joined in Grundy County by his brother Basile/Bazael Lamsett and family, who adopted the surname Specie.

According to Grundy County Probate records, Peter Specie died in or near the village of Dresden, February 22, 1846, and was buried in the Catholic cemetery at Dresden. The cemetery located on Hansel Road, in Section 26, Aux Sable Township, is known as the Dresden, Old Saint Mary's or Saint Anthony's Cemetery,.

Stephen J.  Sweet


Stephen J. Sweet came to Kendall County in 1830 with Peter Specie (Piche). Stephen Sweet's early life is pretty much a mystery. It is unknown if Sweet was Specie's (Piche's), partner or employee. History records that he helped Specie (Piche) build his cabin and they both lived there but the cabin and claim was known as Specie's (Piche's).

In December 1830, Bailey Hobson spoke of stopping at the Frenchman's cabin on his trips between Kendall and Du Page County. His comments indicated Specie (Piche) was living there alone.[106]

According to Rev. Hicks, Sweet and Specie (Piche) parted company shortly after the Black Hawk war in 1832. Sweet worked around Yorkville for a while and then moved to McLean County and married.[107]

Stephen was not found in McLean County, but by 1839 he was living in Whiteside County, Illinois where two of his nephews James A. Sweet and William Minta were living. Stephen Sweet was born about 1790 in New York. Precisely where his birth occurred is unknown to the compiler. It is known that his nephew James A. Sweet was born at Fayette, Seneca Co., New York March 9, 1812. James A. Sweet was one of the earliest settlers of Garden Plain Township, Whiteside Co., Illinois and became a prominent and leading citizen of Whiteside County.

On February 11, 1840, at about age 50, Stephen married Mrs. Margaret Sey in Whiteside County. Margaret was born about 1808 in South Carolina and was the widow of Thomas Sey who had come to Garden Plain Township, in 1839. Thomas died soon after his arrival leaving a widow and one son, Thomas Sey, Jr., who was killed during the Civil War.

Stephen J. Sweet died in Whiteside County Dec 18, 1862 at 72 years of age and is buried in Garden Plain Cemetery, Garden Plain Township. His widow, Margaret (Sey) Sweet died Dec 2, 1890 at 88 years of age and is buried in the same cemetery.

Vetal Vermette Family


            Vetal Vermette was a French-Canadian fur trader born January 29, 1798[108] at Sandwich, Ontario, Canada.[109] He died May 10, 1883. No record of his place of death has been found, but it may have occurred in Newton or Jasper County, Indiana.

Vetal built a cabin near Plainfield, Will County, Illinois and lived there while exchanging trade goods for furs with the Indians. The specific date of his arrival in Will County in unknown but Vetal was one of the first white men in the vicinity of Plainfield. An arrival date of about 1825 is probably a safe bet but he could have arrived several years earlier. Some researchers believe he may have arrived there as early as 1818-1820.[110]

Rev. Hicks places Vetal in Big Grove Township as early as 1828.[111]  Vetal's son, Lewis Vermette was born in Ottawa, Illinois in 1829. The Vermette family may have been in Kendall County as early as 1829. They were in Big Grove Township at the time of the 1830 census.

Vetal Vermette married Cornelia 'Huldah' Walker daughter of Dr. David and Phoebe Elizabeth (Finley) Walker of Ottawa, May 3, 1828. They were married in Dr. David Walker's home by Huldah's uncle, and David's brother, Rev. Jesse Walker.[112] At a later date, Edmund Weed married Huldah Walker's sister Keziah Maria Walker making Vetal and Edmund brothers-in-law.

Huldah was born in September 29, 1811 in Nashville, Tennessee. Her father, Dr. David Walker was from Buckingham or Rockingham County, Virginia. Dr. Walker arrived in Ottawa in the fall of 1826, and died there September 14, 1835. Huldah's mother, Phoebe, was the daughter of James Finley and Keziah (Martin) Finley. She was born October 18, 1774 in Augusta or Lincoln County, Virginia and died in Ottawa August 25, 1867. Both of Huldah's parents are buried in Ottawa.

According to Huldah's obituary, Vetal and Huldah moved from Ottawa to the part of La Salle County known as the Eastern Precinct in 1829, which included the area that became Hawley's Grove. Vetal entered the west half of the northeast quarter of section 31 near the grove and built a log cabin for their home.[113] When they moved to Kendall County the family consisted of, Vetal, Huldah, and their son Lewis Vermette. A daughter, Maria Vermette was born after they arrived in Kendall County.

In the winter of 1830-31, the Legislature approved the organization of La Salle County. The county was divided into three precincts: Vermilion, Ottawa, and Eastern. The first election in the Eastern Precinct was held March 7, 1831 in the Vermette home.

When the Blackhawk War broke out in the spring of 1832, fearing for their lives the settlers rushed to Plainfield or Ottawa for protection. Ottawa was closest to the Vermette home, so they hurried to Ottawa on foot. Their journey was made at night. While on their way to Ottawa a violent thunderstorm occurred. They were without shelter but their fear of the Indians drove them to keep moving. The wind driven, chilly rain soaked them to the skin and baby Maria died from exposure shortly after their flight.

The baby's death, combined with their isolation and fear of the Indians, probably caused the Vermette family to decide to leave their pioneer home. On November 16, 1832, Vetal sold his eighty acres to Abraham Holderman.

When the Vermette family left Kendall County they moved to La Salle County. Vetal purchased property below Danway, about nine miles northeast of Ottawa, on the old road from Chicago to Ottawa. The place was known as Vermett's Point, and Vetal kept a tavern (inn) there.[114] In 1835, Vetal sold forty acres in Miller Township, La Salle County to his brother-on-law Walter Selvey.[115]

By 1840, Vetal had purchased the northeast quarter of section 12, Rutland Township, La Salle County.[116] The Vermette family continued to live in Rutland Township until sometime after 1860.[117],[118] Sometime between 1860 and 1870 the Rutland Township property was sold, and Vetal and Huldah separated. No record of a divorce was found in La Salle County so they may have just gone their separate ways.

In 1870, Vetal Vermette was living in Allen Township, La Salle County with his son George E. Vermette.[119] Their surnames were spelled Vemutto, and Vetal is listed as a 70-year-old male born in France. In 1870, Huldah Vermette was living in Allen Township, La Salle County with her children, David Vermette, Mark Vermette, Charles Vermette, and Adaline Vermette.[120]

By 1880, Vetal was living with Henry Courtney and Courtney's daughter Mary Courtney in Carpenter, Jasper County, Indiana.[121] In 1880, Vetal's daughter Phoebe Ann Vermette and her husband William D. Waterman were also living in Carpenter, Jasper County, Indiana.[122] No census record was found of Vetal after 1880. According to information provided by Huldah Vermette on an application for a pension based on their son Lewis' Civil War record, Vetal died May 10, 1883. His place of death was not given but may have been Jasper or Newton County, Indiana.[123]

In 1880, Huldah was living with her son Charles Vermette and his family in Bloom Township Cook County, Illinois.[124] In 1900, Huldah Vermette was living with her son Charles in Lake Township, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.[125] Huldah died April 20, 1902 at Charles' home in Lake Township, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois at 91 years of age. It is known that Vetal and Huldah had at least twelve children. Six of her seven surviving children were with her at the time of her death.

Their first child, Lewis Vermette was born in 1829 in Ottawa. On January 20, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, 53rd Illinois Infantry. There are two versions of what happened to Lewis. His younger sister Emeline B. Emily passed down the oral history that Lewis was captured and imprisoned at Andersonville, Georgia where he died. The Illinois Adjutant General's records state Lewis deserted December 26, 1863.[126] It is difficult to determine which version is correct. Desertion during the Civil War was fairly common; on the other hand many of the men captured were inadvertently listed as deserters. The list of prisoners held at Andersonville was examined and Lewis' name was not found. In either case, Lewis did not return home from the Civil War.

Maria Vermette was born in Kendall County December 11, 1831. She died of exposure brought on by the family's flight to Ottawa during the Blackhawk War in the spring of 1832.

Hamilton Vermette was born about 1833 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. At the time of the1860 census he was living in Rutland Township.[127]

Hamilton married Indiana Cookson November 19, 1860 in Mason County, IL.       

Phoebe Ann Vermette was born February 26, 1836 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. She married William D. Waterman February 23, 1859 in La Salle County. William D. was born October 1827 in Pennsylvania. Phoebe Ann and William had one son, William Newton Waterman.[128]

In the spring of 1875, Phoebe Ann and William D. moved to a farm near Goodland, Indiana where they lived for 35 years. At the time of the 1880, 1900 and 1910 censuses, they were living in Carpenter Township, Jasper County, Indiana.[129] William D. died in Indiana in August 1910. After the death of her husband, Phoebe Ann lived with her son William Newton in Chicago. Phoebe Ann (Vermette) Waterman died March 4, 1917 in Chicago, Illinois and is buried beside her husband in Goodland Cemetery, Jasper County, Indiana.[130],[131]

George E. Vermette was born about 1837 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. George E. married Agnes Leitch July 2, 1867 in La Salle County. In 1870, George E. was enumerated as the head of a household and farmer in Allen Township, La Salle County.[132] In 1880, George E. and his family were enumerated in Bloom Township, Cook County, Illinois. Their son K. E. Vermette was born in Illinois and sons, E. T. Vermette and B. E. Vermette, were born in Indiana.[133]

Jane M. Vermette was born February 9, 1840 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. She married Christopher Columbus Nelson August 31, 1861 in La Salle County. Christopher was born about 1830 in Murray, Orleans County, New York, and died October 23, 1866 in Mission Township, La Salle County, Illinois. Jane died May 10, 1864 in Ottawa, Illinois.

Harriet Vermett was born about 1841-1842 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. She died there February 14, 1845 at three years of age.

Emeline B. Emily Vermette was born October 19, 1843 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. In the 1860 census she was enumerated in Rutland Township, where she was teaching school.

Emily married Francis Frank Bagwill, May 26, 1864 in Kendall County. Frank was born January 28, 1839 in Kendall County. In 1870, Frank and Emily were living with his parents in Mission Township, La Salle County.[134] In 1880, Frank, Emily, and their son Clinton W. Bagwill were enumerated in the census of Madison, Polk County, Iowa.[135] From about 1882 until 1887 Frank was a livestock dealer in Story County, Iowa. Around 1888-1889, he was a loan agent in Des Moines, Iowa.[136] In 1900, Frank and Emily were living in Cambridge, Furnas County, Nebraska where Frank was president of a small bank.[137] By 1910, Frank and Emily had separated. Frank was living with his son, Clinton W. in White Pine County, Nevada.[138] Emily was working as a private nurse in the Edward Quackenbush home in Portland, Oregon.[139] She indicated she was married and had one child still living. In 1920, Emily Bagwill was living in Morgan Hill, Santa Clara County, California.[140] In about 1923, Emily moved to Berkeley, Alameda County, California where she remained until she entered a nursing home in Hayward, California.[141],[142]   

Francis Frank Bagwill died in McGill, White Pine County, Nevada in about 1917. Emeline B. Emily (Vermette) Bagwill died May 15, 1945 in Oaks Sanatorium, Hayward, Alameda County, California at the remarkable age of 101 years, six months, and 26 days.[143]

Adaline Vermette was born in April 1846 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. Adaline was unmarried and living with her brother Charles E. Vermette in Lake Township, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois at the time of the 1900 census. She and her brother Charles E. indicated their father was born in Canada.[144] In 1910, Adaline was living with her brother Charles E. in San Francisco, California.[145] In 1920, Adaline was the head of the household in Sacramento, California. Her nieces, Alma Elaine and Maude E. were living with her.[146],[147] In 1930, Adaline was enumerated with her brother, Charles E. and his daughters, Alma E. and Maude E.[148] Adaline Vermette died January 5, 1934 in Sacramento, Sacramento County, California. She is buried in East Lawn Cemetery, Sacramento.[149]

David Vermette was born in September 1847 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. David married a woman whose given name was Clara. In 1900 they were enumerated in Hammond, Lake County, Indiana. Three of David and Clara's children were born in Indiana and one in Illinois.[150]

Mark Vermette was born about 1853 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. The last record found of Mark was the 1870 census of Allen Township, La Salle County.[151]

Charles E. Vermette was born in December 1855 in Rutland Township, La Salle County. In 1870, the four youngest Vermette children, Adaline Vermette, David Vermette, Mark Vermette, and Charles E. Vermette were living with their mother Huldah Vermette in Allen Township.[152]

Charles E. Vermette married Mariette Northrup December 15, 1877 in Iroquois County, Illinois. They had daughters, Alma Elaine and Maude E. Vermette. Alma Elaine was born November 12, 1885 in Illinois and died November 30, 1951 in Sacramento, CA.[153] In 1880, Charles E. Vermette, his family and mother Huldah, was living in Bloom Township, Cook County, Illinois.[154] In 1900, Charles E., his daughters Alma Elaine Vermette and Maude E Vermette, his sister Adaline Vermette, and mother Huldah were living in Lake Township, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. His wife, Mariette was not enumerated with them in the 1900 census.[155] In 1910, Charles E., his daughters, Alma E. and Maude E. and his sister Adaline were living in San Francisco, California.[156],[157] In 1930, Charles E., his daughters, Alma E. and Maude E., and his sister Adaline were enumerated in Sacramento, California.[158] Charles E. Vermette died December 7, 1933 in Sacramento, Sacramento County, California and is buried in East Lawn Cemetery Sacramento.[159]

Edmund Weed Family


            Edmund Weed was born about 1803 in New York. In 1825, Edmund's name was found on a list of taxpayers of Peoria County and attached territory. He was living in the area then called Ten Mile Creek, which is near the present day site of Mossville.[160] Edmund is credited with being the third settler in the area.

The first term of the Peoria County Circuit Court was convened November 14, 1825. The second case called was a slander suit brought against Edmund Weed by Abner Cooper and his wife Sarah Cooper. Edmund was found not guilty and permitted to recover his costs from the Coopers. Shortly thereafter, a related case was on the same docket. Abner Cooper and his wife Sarah vs. Sally Weed motion to reconsider, plus the same parties vs. Edmund Weed motion to reconsider.[161] Sally Weed was not specifically named as Edmund's wife; she may have been his mother.

In about 1826, Edmund sold his Peoria County claim to Samuel Clifton and moved in Ottawa, La Salle County, becoming one of the earliest settlers of the area.[162]

Edmund married Keziah Maria Walker daughter of Dr. David and Phoebe Elizabeth (Finley) Walker. A search of the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900 did not reveal when they were married. While no record of their marriage was found the ages of their children suggests they probably were married around 1826.

On September 26, 1829, Edmund entered part of the southwest quarter of section 30, Big Grove Township. Seven people were enumerated in the Weed household in 1830. There were two males born between 1800 and 1810 and one male born between 1825 and 1830. One of the males born between 1800 and 1810 would have been Edmund. The other has not been identified. Four females were enumerated. An unidentified female was born between 1770 and 1780, who may have been Edmund's mother, perhaps Sally Weed. The female born between 1800 and 1810 would have been Keziah M. (Walker) Weed. A female born between 1810 and 1815 has not been identified, the female born between 1825 and 1830, was the Weed's daughter Caroline E. Weed born about 1827. It is assumed the male born between 1825 and 1830 was the Weed's son but apparently he was dead by the time of in the 1840 census.        

In December 1831, Edmund sold his 128 acres to Abraham Holderman and the Weed family left Kendall County. It is uncertain where he settled next but it may have been Du Page - Will County area as he was a member of Rev. Jesse Walker's Plainfield congregation. It is known that during the Black Hawk War in the summer of 1832, Edmund Weed was a sergeant in Captain James Walker's detachment of Mounted Volunteers organized at Fort Walker.[163]

In both 1840 and 1850, Sally Weed was enumerated in Du Page County. In 1850 her age was given as seventy, which means she was born about 1780 and fits the profile of the older woman living with Edmund and his family in 1830.[164] Her place of birth was given as Connecticut.

In about 1834-6, the Weed family settled at Root River, now Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin.[165] They were enumerated there in 1840 and a special census in 1842. By 1850, the Weed Family was living in Sheboygan, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin. Edmund was listed as a 49-year-old fisherman born in New York. His wife, Keziah M. Weed was 44 years of age, born in Tennessee. Daughter Sarah Ann Weed was 16 years of age born in Illinois, thus born about 1833-4. Daughter Eliza J. Weed was 14 years of age, born about 1836 in Wisconsin. A twelve-year-old male named Philander who was born about 1838 in Wisconsin was also enumerated.[166] Philander did not appear in later censuses.

In 1860, Edmund and Keziah M. were living with their daughter Malinda Weed and son-in-law, William Flanders in Washington Township, Yolo County California.[167] Edmund is listed as 56 years of age, born in New York. His wife was enumerated as 54 years of age, born in Tennessee. Malinda E. (Weed) Flanders was 21 years of age, born in Wisconsin. This may have been Malinda's second marriage. Her husband was considerably older, 43 years of age, and a two-year-old male named Edmund Gates who was born in Wisconsin, was living in their household.

In 1870, Edmund and his wife Maria K. (Rather than Keziah M.) were living in Yolo County California, post office Woodland. Edmund was listed as 67 years of age, a farmer, born in New York. Maria K. was 66 years of age and born in Tennessee.[168] 

Edmund Weed died with a will, March 28, 1871 in Yolo County, California. At the time of his death he owned 342 acres on the west bank of the Sacramento River in Yolo County and various items of personal property. The executors of Edmund's estate listed his widow, Keziah M. Weed, and his daughter Malinda Flanders as his heirs by virtue of his last will and testament.[169] Keziah M. inherited the real estate and Malinda inherited the personal property, after all just debts had been paid.

Keziah Maria Weed died without a will, October 20, 1877 in Yolo County, California.[170] Keziah M.'s probate record listed her next of kin. They were her daughters: Eliza J. Morton, 43 years of age, resident of the City of Sacramento; Caroline E. Ferguson about 50 years of age, resident of Tulare County, CA. In addition, her grandchildren Caroline Flanders and William Flanders, respectively about sixteen and thirteen years of age, minor children of Malinda Flanders Keziah M.'s deceased daughter were listed. The Flanders children were residents of Yolo County.

Eliza J. Weed married D. Morton. In 1870, they were living in Sacramento, California.[171] In 1880 they were found in Lincoln, Placer County, California.[172]

Caroline E. (Weed) Ferguson married John D. Ferguson. She died June 19, 1889 and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Woodland, Yolo County, California. Caroline E. was born about 1827 in Illinois and was 62 years of age at the time of her death.[173]

Malinda E. (Weed) Flanders married William Flanders. She died May 12, 1873 in Yolo County, California and is buried in Woodland Cemetery.[174]

Sarah Ann Weed married Thomas Boyd. The Boyd family was found in the 1870 census in Fremont Township, Yolo County, California.[175] In 1880, they were enumerated in Mussel Slough, Tulare County, California.[176] Sarah Ann (Weed) Boyd was not mentioned in probate records pertaining to Keziah M.'s estate.

 

References

 

 

Index

 

Allen, Henry................................ 3, 5, 6, 30

Andrews, Elizabeth Ann.......................... 15

Bagwill, Clinton....................................... 26

Bagwill, Clinton W................................... 26

Bagwill, Emeline B Emily (Vermette)........ 27

Bagwill, Emeline B. Emily (Vermette)....... 27

Bagwill, Francis Frank....................... 26, 27

Beggs, Rev. Stephen R............................ 6

Beresford, Charles Depew........................ 8

Beresford, Family........................... 5, 7, 12

Beresford, Fred Grant............................... 8

Beresford, James..................................... 8

Beresford, Jane....................................... 9

Beresford, John W.................... 7, 8, 12, 13

Beresford, Mary.................................. 7, 12

Beresford, Mary....................................... 8

Beresford, Mary (Disert)........................... 7

Beresford, Mary Ann................................ 9

Beresford, Mary Della............................... 8

Beresford, Robert 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12

Beresford, Theretta Edna.......................... 8

Beresford, Theron James.......................... 8

Beresford, Willis Virgil.............................. 8

Blackburn, Mrs. Emily............................. 15

Bogardus, John L................................. 2, 3

Boyd, Sarah Ann (Weed)......................... 29

Boyd, Thomas........................................ 29

Campbell, Sarah L.................................. 11

Cargill, Mary Ann...................................... 8

Cherry, Charles....................................... 12

Clark, George W..................................... 11

Clark, John Lee....................................... 23

Clarke, John K........................................ 16

Clifton, Samuel....................................... 28

Cody, Merritt.......................................... 19

Cody, William R...................................... 18

Conde, Janet.......................................... 14

Cooper, Abner........................................ 28

Cooper, Sarah........................................ 28

Countryman, Betsey............................... 10

Countryman, Frederic............. 3, 4, 9, 10, 31

Countryman, Frederic M....... 1, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10

Countryman, Nancy................................ 10

Countryman, Sarah................................. 10

Courtney, Henry...................................... 25

Courtney, Mary....................................... 25

Crandall, Elizabeth A............................... 15

Crossman, Alice Rose............................ 18

Crossman, Catherine............................... 18

Crossman, Levi W.................................. 18

Crossman, Shirley.................................. 18

Crossman, William L............................... 18

Cullen, Charles Sumner............................. 9

Cullen, Flora H......................................... 9

Cullen, Florence....................................... 9

Cullen, Genoa A....................................... 9

Cullen, Josephine..................................... 9

Cullen, Mary Ann...................................... 8

Cullen, William.......................................... 9

Dillon, Jesse............................................ 3

Dougherty, Ann................................. 11, 20

Dougherty, Family............................. 11, 19

Dougherty, George W............................. 11

Dougherty, John 1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12, 19, 20, 23, 31

Dougherty, John III................................. 11

Dougherty, John, II............. 7, 10, 11, 12, 31

Dougherty, John, Sr.......................... 10, 11

Dougherty, Levi...................................... 11

Dougherty, Mary (Hollowell)......... 10, 19, 20

Dougherty, Miriam.................................. 11

Doughterty, John 1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12, 19, 20, 23, 31

En-do-ga............................................ 9, 10

Ferguson, Caroline E.............................. 29

Ferguson, James........................ 1, 5, 8, 12

Ferguson, John D................................... 29

Finley, James......................................... 24

Finley, Keziah (Martin)............................. 24

Flanders, Malinda E. (Weed)................... 29

Flanders, William.................................... 29

Frazier, Harriet E..................................... 17

Hadfield, Ann......................................... 14

Hadfield, Mary A,................................... 14

Hadfield, Samuel.................................... 14

Haight, D. M........................................... 18

Haight, David M..................................... 18

Haight, Elizabeth Ann.............................. 18

Haight, John R....................................... 18

Haight, John Richard.............................. 18

Haight, Mabel......................................... 18

Harvey, Elizabeth (Cheney)...................... 17

Harvey, Michael, Sr................................. 17

Havenhill, Fielding.................................. 10

Hawley, Aaron 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 12, 13, 15, 30, 31

Hawley, Caroline............................... 16, 20

Hawley, Chloe C..................................... 16

Hawley, Family................................. 4, 5, 7

Hawley, George................................ 13, 14

Hawley, George C................................... 14

Hawley, Gideon........................... 13, 15, 16

Hawley, Gideon M.................................. 14

Hawley, Henry........................................ 15

Hawley, John P...................................... 15

Hawley, John Pierce.......................... 14, 15

Hawley, Joseph...................................... 14

Hawley, Lavinia....................................... 16

Hawley, Lavinia (Darrah).......................... 13

Hawley, Lillian E..................................... 14

Hawley, Maroni....................................... 14

Hawley, Martha....................................... 14

Hawley, Mary.......................................... 14

Hawley, Mary L....................................... 14

Hawley, Nellie J...................................... 16

Hawley, Pierce 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 16, 31

Hawley, Priscilla..................................... 15

Hawley, Priscilla..................................... 16

Hawley, Priscilla Adele............................ 16

Hawley, Rosina....................................... 14

Hawley, Sarah................................... 14, 15

Hawley, Willard A.................................... 16

Hawley, William...................................... 14

Hawley, William S................................... 15

Hawley, William Schrader........................ 15

Hicks, Rev........................ 10, 12, 22, 23, 24

Hobson, Adella...................................... 19

Hobson, Bailey 1, 4, 6, 7, 11, 16, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 31

Hobson, Baley.................................. 16, 17

Hobson, Baly.................................... 16, 17

Hobson, Celia........................................ 17

Hobson, Charlotte.................................. 18

Hobson, Clara H..................................... 17

Hobson, Clayton.................................... 18

Hobson, Elizabeth.................................. 18

Hobson, Ellen........................................ 18

Hobson, Elvira....................................... 18

Hobson, Emma...................................... 17

Hobson, Gertrude E................................ 17

Hobson, Jesse....................................... 11

Hobson, John H................................ 16, 17

Hobson, John Harvey............................. 17

Hobson, Lydia (Harvey).......................... 17

Hobson, Martha...................................... 18

Hobson, Mary Ann.................................. 17

Hobson, Mary Ann Polly......................... 17

Hobson, Merritt S................................... 18

Hobson, Merritt Sylvester........................ 18

Hobson, Mr. 4, 6, 7, 11, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 31, 32

Hobson, Nancy Jane.............................. 18

Hobson, Nathan Harvey.......................... 11

Hobson, Oliver Cromwell......................... 18

Hobson, Rebecca (Freeman)................... 11

Hobson, William Stewart......................... 17

Holcomb, Mary C................................... 15

Holcomb, O. E....................................... 15

Holcomb, Sallie...................................... 15

Holderman, Abraham........ 12, 13, 21, 25, 28

Hollenback, Clark.................................... 20

Hollowell, John....................................... 10

Hollowell, Mary....................................... 10

Hollowell, Miriam (Overman).................... 10

Hyde, Elijah............................................. 3

Johnson, Sylvia...................................... 15

Kellogg, Daniel....................................... 10

Kentner, Elmira....................................... 18

Kinzie, John H........................................ 22

Kinzie, Juliette............................. 11, 22, 32

Kinzie, Mr............................................... 23

Langworthy, Augustus......................... 3, 19

LeBarron, John Kittredge........................ 23

Leitch, Agnes......................................... 26

Matheny, Amelia Charlotte....................... 15

Matheny, Nancy Sebrina......................... 15

McClellan, Eliza (Small)........................... 21

McClellan, Francis W.............................. 21

McClellan, Sarah Ann (Selvey)................. 21

Meisinger, J. D....................................... 17

Miller, R. C............................................. 10

Minkler, Smith G..................................... 12

Minta, William......................................... 23

Morton, D.............................................. 29

Morton, Eliza J....................................... 29

Nelson, Christopher C............................. 26

Northrup, Mariette................................... 27

Page, Albert........................................... 18

Page, Edmund Elliot............................... 18

Page, Ethel............................................ 18

Page, Willie............................................ 18

Parcell, William...................... 1, 4, 6, 20, 31

Peck, Kittie Depew................................... 8

Piche, Peter................................ 1, 3, 7, 22

Piche, Peter Specie................................ 23

Royce, Charlotte E................................. 17

Scarritt, Rev. Isaac................................... 6

Schrader, Jacob..................................... 13

Schrader, Mary (Wolfe)........................... 13

Schrader, Sarah................................ 13, 16

Scott, Caroline (Hawley).................... 13, 16

Scott, Permelia....................................... 16

Scott, Stephen A.................................... 16

Scott, Willard.............................. 13, 16, 20

Seely, Edmund....................................... 12

Selvey, Ann (Dougherty)......................... 22

Selvey, Anna I........................................ 22

Selvey, Anna I. Annie.............................. 22

Selvey, Charles...................................... 21

Selvey, Charles Perry.............................. 21

Selvey, Chester...................................... 21

Selvey, Ellen P....................................... 21

Selvey, Emma E..................................... 22

Selvey, Eva L......................................... 22

Selvey, G. W.......................................... 21

Selvey, John L....................................... 22

Selvey, Mary P....................................... 21

Selvey, Perry.......................................... 21

Selvey, S. Emma.................................... 22

Selvey, Sarah Ann.................................. 21

Selvey, Walter 1, 4, 6, 7, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 25, 31

Sencenbaugh, Wilber.............................. 22

Sey, Mrs. Margaret................................. 24

Sey, Thomas.......................................... 24

Sey, Thomas, Jr..................................... 24

Smith, Joseph, Sr................................... 14

Specie (Piche)........................................ 23

Specie, Peter.................................... 22, 23

Specie, Peter........................................... 7

Specie, Peter Piche.................................. 7

Stewart, Clarissa..................................... 17

Stewart, Lazarus..................................... 17

Stewart, Lewis............................. 17, 19, 20

Stewart, Mr.................................. 17, 19, 20

Stewart, Polly (Boyd).............................. 17

Sweet, James A..................................... 23

Sweet, Margaret (Sey)............................. 24

Sweet, Stephen......................... 2, 7, 22, 23

Sweet, Stephen J.............................. 23, 24

Vananken, J. D....................................... 21

Vermette, Adaline.............................. 25, 27

Vermette, Adaline.............................. 25, 27

Vermette, Alma....................................... 27

Vermette, Alma Elaine............................. 27

Vermette, B. E........................................ 26

Vermette, Charles.............................. 25, 27

Vermette, Charles E.......................... 27, 33

Vermette, David................................ 25, 27

Vermette, E. T........................................ 26

Vermette, Emeline B. Emily............... 25, 26

Vermette, Family......................... 19, 24, 25

Vermette, George E.......................... 25, 26

Vermette, Hamilton................................. 26

Vermette, Huldah.............................. 25, 27

Vermette, Jane....................................... 26

Vermette, K. E........................................ 26

Vermette, Lewis................................ 24, 25

Vermette, Maria................................. 24, 26

Vermette, Mark.................................. 25, 27

Vermette, Maude.................................... 27

Vermette, Maude E................................. 27

Vermette, Phebe A............................ 25, 26

Vermette, Phoebe Ann...................... 25, 26

Vermette, Vetal............. 1, 4, 6, 7, 24, 25, 31

Walker, Captain James............................ 28

Walker, Dr. David................................ 6, 24

Walker, Huldah....................................... 24

Walker, James........................... 3, 6, 28, 30

Walker, Jane............................................ 6

Walker, Jane G. (Walker)........................... 6

Walker, Keziah Maria......................... 24, 28

Walker, Phoebe (Finley).......................... 24

Walker, Rev. Jesse... 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 24, 28, 30

Ward, Joseph......................................... 17

Waterman, Phoebe Ann (Vermette).......... 26

Waterman, William D......................... 25, 26

Waterman, William Newton...................... 26

Weed, Caroline E.................................... 28

Weed, Edmund 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 24, 27, 28, 29, 31

Weed, Eliza J.................................... 28, 29

Weed, Keziah M. (Walker).................. 28, 29

Weed, Sally............................................ 28

Weed, Sarah Ann.............................. 28, 29

Wight, Lyman.................................... 14, 32

Wight, Mary (Hawley).............................. 14

Woodruff, C........................................... 21

Woodruff, Lester B................................. 21

Woodruff, Martin.................................... 21

Wooley, Jedediah, Sr........................ 24, 32

Wyckoff, Family................................. 9, 31

Wyckoff, Rev. Alphonso D....................... 9

Young, John.......................................... 15

 

 

 


[1] For a more definitive explanation see: http://maps.ilgw.org/

[2] Aaron Hawley was one of two clerks of the election March 1, 1825. History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 288.

[3] "Commissioner's Court."

[4] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 303.

[5] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, pp. 304 & 306.

[6] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, pp. 304 & 308.

[7] Fox River Precinct. History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 310.

[8] From Chillicothe, up the Illinois River to a point near its headwaters.

[9] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 311.

[10] Fever River post office was established June, 4, 1825. January 1, 1826 the post office was renamed Galena. The Fever River district was named for the river.

[11] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, pp. 311 & 312.

[12] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 312.

[13] Age categories were; under 5, 5 to 10, 10 to 15; 15 to 20; 20 to 30; 30 to 40; 40-50; 50-60; 60-70; 70-80; 80 to 90; 90 to 100; and over 100 years.

[14] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p.36.

[15] Memorials of Methodism in the Bounds of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati, printed for the author by Cranston and Stowe, 1886, p. 18.

[16] Memorials of Methodism in the Bounds of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati, printed for the author by Cranston and Stowe, 1886, p. 17.

[17] At this time, St. Clair County, Illinois was the center of Methodism in Illinois.

[18] Wilbur F. WALKER owned the keelboat. It is unknown if he was related to Rev. Jesse Walker.

[19] According to the History of La Salle County, Illinois, Vol. I, Chicago: Interstate Publishing Co., 1886, p. 202-3, the keelboat's trip up the Illinois River was the first commercial enterprise in the county. This was probably the keelboat chartered by Rev. Jesse Walker to move the items and material required to establish the mission, and would not qualify as a commercial venture.

[20] Worthies & Workers, Both Ministers and Laymen of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati: Cranston & Curts printers, 1896, p. 77.

[21] The compiler is unaware of Henry Allen's marital status or if had a family.

[22] Recollections of James W. Beresford. Recollections of the Pioneers of Lee County, Illinois, Dixon, Illinois: Inez A. Kennedy, 1893, pp. 120-7.

[23]Countryman's name was found on an 1823 voter's list of Michilimackinac County, Michigan suggesting he did not come to Kendall County until the fall of 1823 or early 1824. 

[24] Worthies & Workers, Both Ministers and Laymen of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati: Cranston & Curts printers, 1896, p. 77.

[25]The mission was located in section 15, Township 25, Range 5, in what became Mission Township, La Salle County.

[26] Memorials of Methodism in the Bounds of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati, printed for the author by Cranston and Stowe, 1886, p. 17.

[27] The missionary family, including Rev. Walker and his wife, consisted of eighteen people. Memorials of Methodism in the Bounds of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati, printed for the author by Cranston and Stowe, 1886, pp. 19-20.

[28] Some historians have indicated Jesse and James Walker were not related. However, according to Rev. A. D. Field, James was the son of one of Jesse Walker's brothers. Worthies & Workers, Both Ministers and Laymen of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati: Cranston & Curts printers, 1896, p. 79.

[29] The school was a "select" school, requiring tuition to attend.

[30] Memorials of Methodism in the Bounds of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati, printed for the author by Cranston and Stowe, 1886, p. 23.

[31] Memorials of Methodism in the Bounds of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati, printed for the author by Cranston and Stowe, 1886, p. 24.

[32] Subsequently renamed Holderman's Grove.

[33] The were Frederic Countryman, John Dougherty, II, Pierce Hawley, Bailey Hobson, William Parcell, Walter Selvey, Vetal Vermette, and Edmund Weed

[34] Others have concluded David Lawton/Laughton and his family were early residents of Kendall County. History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 51. The compiler could find no evidence that the Lawton/Laughton family lived in Kendall County.

[35] Recollections of James W. Beresford. Recollections of the Pioneers of Lee County, Illinois, Dixon, Illinois: Inez A. Kennedy, 1893, p. 124.

[36] Originally called Hawley's Grove.

[37] 1830 census Peoria and Putnam Counties, IL, p. 300A.

[38] Peoria, Illinois.

[39] 1870 census of Sheridan, Washington County, Nebraska, family and dwelling number 49.

[40] The child's name is unknown to the compiler.

[41] Rev. Wyckoff was known as A. D. Wyckoff.

[42] Kendall County Record, February 19, 1890.

[43] 1870 census of Chebanse, Iroquois County, Illinois, dwelling number 467, family number457.

[44] History of La Salle County, Illinois, Vol. I, Chicago: Interstate Publishing Co., 1886, p. 358.

[45] Michilimackinac Co., MI, voter records for 1823, p. 478. In 1849, Michilimackinac was renamed Mackinac County.

[46] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, pp. 44-5.

[47] Treaty with the Potawatomie Tribe made and concluded at Camp Tippecanoe, Indiana, Oct 20, 1832.

[48] The Treaty with the Chippewa, Ottowa (sic Ottawa) and Potawatamie Indians dated September 26, 1833 and proclaimed February 21, 1835 included grants to several people familiar to Kendall County historians. The following received cash grants in lieu of Reservations; Jesse Walker $1,500; Nancy Contraman $600, Sally Contraman $600, and Betsey Contraman $600, J. B. Campbell was appointed trustee for the Countryman girls who were minors. The treaty also contained amounts payable to individuals, on justly due claims. Frederick H. Contraman $200; George Hollenbeck $100; George Haverhill $60; Clark Hollenbeck $50; Robert Beresford $200 and Edmund Weed $100. As the treaty was made shortly after the conclusion of the Black Hawk War, it is assumed the grants were made to compensate the grantees for losses to personal property, and/or service to the U. S. Government during the war.  

[49] Fielding Heavenhill obituary published in the Kendall County Record, May 21, 1890.

[50] Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Lee County, edited by A. C. Bardwell. Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co., 1904, p. 700.

[51] Fort Riley is located near Manhattan, Kansas.

[52] Soldier Creek flows south through the Potawatomi Indian Reservations and drains into the Kansas River.

[53] Kansas Territorial Census, 12th District, p. 3, 1855; ditto, Calhoun Co., p. 2, 1857.

[54] Calhoun County Kansas was renamed Jackson County in 1859.

[55] No evidence was provided to substantiate this hypothesis. History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, pp. 44-5.

[56] Wau-Bun the Early Days of the Northwest, Kinzie, Mrs. John H., Menasha, WI: George Banta Publishing Co., pp. 136-7.

[57] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 64.

[58] Name was spelled Furguson on ship's passenger manifest.

[59] Information on Aaron Hawley's family is included because he was a member of the missionary party. To the compiler's knowledge they were not residents of Kendall County.

[60] The Black Hawk War 1831-1832: Vol. II, Letters & Papers, Whitney, Ellen M., Springfield, IL: Illinois State Historical Library, 1973, footnote # 12, pp. 451-2.

[61] About 1817.

[62] 1820 census White Co., IL, p. 186, line 10.

[63] 1820 census Madison Co., IL,  p. 148, line 24

[64] This would make the Pierce Hawley family the first white family to settle in Kendall County. Recollections of James W. Beresford. Recollections of the Pioneers of Lee County, Illinois, Dixon, Illinois: Inez A. Kennedy, 1893, p. 124.

[65] History of the Church, by Joseph Smith, Vol. 3, p. 253.

[66] 1840 census Lee County, IA, page numbers not given.

[67] 1850 census Gillespie Co., TX, p. 315.

[68] Plural wife was the Mormon term for multiple wives. Mary was Lyman Wight's second wife while he was married to his first wife.

[69] 1850 census Zodiac Twp, Gillespie Co., TX, p. 315.

[70] Biographical History of Shelby and Audubon Counties, Iowa, Chicago, 1889, p. 452.

[71] The Sangamon County of 1824 was not the Sangamon County of today.

[72] Indian Territory.

[73] 1870 census Grove Township, Shelby Co., IA, p. 8C.

[74] 1900 census Blue Township, Jackson Co., MO, p. 56 B. 

[75] 1850 census Zodiac Twp, Gillespie Co., TX, p. 315.

[76] 1880 census Grove, Shelby Co., IA, p. 8C.

[77] 1850 census Zodiac Twp, Gillespie Co., TX, page 315.

[78] 1860 census Shelby Co., IA, p. 14.

[79] 1850 census Zodiac Twp, Gillespie Co., TX, page 315.

[80] 1880 census Fillmore, Millard Co., UT, p. 462B.

[81] 1880 census Grove, Shelby Co, IA, p. 8C.

[82] 1850 census Zodiac Twp, Gillespie Co., TX, p. 315.

[83] 1850 census Zodiac Twp, Gillespie Co., TX, p. 315.

[84] 1880 census Union Township, Shelby Co., IA, p. 5A.

[85] Biographical History of Shelby & Audubon Counties, IA, Chicago, 1889, pp. 472-4.

[86] Recollections of James W. Beresford. Recollections of the Pioneers of Lee County, Illinois, Dixon, Illinois: Inez A. Kennedy, 1893, p. 124.

[87] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 315.

[88] Lost Creek (now Jefferson Co., TN) Quaker Society Meeting Minutes (MM).

[89] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 51.

[90] Interview with Clarissa Hobson published in the Chicago newspaper InterOcean, July 8, 1883.

[91] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 51.

[92] History of Du Page County, Illinois, by C. W. Richmond, Aurora, 1877.

[93] The Hobson Family, typewritten piece found in the Naperville Public Library.

[94] Interview with Clarissa Hobson published in the Chicago newspaper InterOcean, July 8, 1883.

[95] 1870 census Hot Springs Township, Napa County, California, p. 3.

[96] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 246.

[97] Mary P. Silvey in marriage records.

[98] M. Eliza on 1870 census of Napa Co., CA

[99] Emma E. 1900 census of Cochise Co., AZ

[100] Sacramento County?

[101] Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento Daily Record October 30, 1876.

[102] Lamset, Pierre also known as Peter Lamsett, Peter Lamssett, Peter Pecie, Peter Piche; and Peter Specie, made two purchases at the estate sale of W.H. Wallace of May 12, 1828, including a martingale; had a claim one mile S of Hardscrabble on which Russell Heacock settled in 1828; in 1830 Lamset settled in the Fox River valley at what later was called Specie Grove; is known to have hired himself out to new settlers, using a breaking plow he owned to prepare the prairie for cultivation; was among the refugees seeking shelter at Fort Dearborn during the early phase of the Black Hawk War; owned land in Kendall County until 1835, when he sold out and moved to Vermillion County (sic Grundy County.) Andreas, Alfred Theodore. History of Chicago. From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. 3 vols. Chicago, 1884-1888. [lists of early settlers, Vol. 3, pp. 394-97]

[103] History of Du Page County, Illinois, by C. W. Richmond, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 179.

[104] Wau-Bun the Early Day in the Northwest, by Juliette Kinzie, 1930 edition, page 134.

[105] Pairs of oxen.

[106] History of Du Page County, Illinois, by C. W. Richmond, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, pp. 179, 187.

[107] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 153.

[108] Marge Van Volkinburg, 823 N. Lind Avenue, Fresno, CA 93727. The compiler has been unable to confirm this information.

[109] Part of Windsor, Ontario since 1935.

[110] In 1830, Vetal, sold his Will County claim to Jedediah Wooley, Sr. Vetal was in La Salle County prior to the date of this transaction.

[111] History of Kendall County, Illinois From Earliest Discoveries, by Rev. E. W. Hicks, Aurora, IL, Knickerbocker & Hodder, 1877, p. 44.

[112] Vetal's occupation was listed as ferryman in Ottawa on their marriage record.

[113] Eighty acres.

[114] History of La Salle County, by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago: Rand McNally & Co., 1877, p. 282.

[115] East part of the southwest quarter of section seven.

[116] 1840 census Rutland Township, La Salle County, p. 136 A, Line 7.

[117] Rutland Township, La Salle County, 1850 census, pp. 307B & 308A, 1860 census, page 107.

[118] Vetal's place of birth was listed as Michigan on the 1850 and 1860 census.

[119] 1870 census Allen Township, La Salle County, Illinois p. 30, family and dwelling #s 120.

[120] 1870 census Allen Township, La Salle County, Illinois, p. 28, family & dwelling #s 75.

[121] Veti Vermett, 1880 census Carpenter, Jasper County, Indiana, 1880 census, p. 337C.

[122] 1880 census Carpenter, Jasper County, Indiana, p. 327D.

[123] Courtesy, Toni L. Evans.

[124] 1880 census Bloom Township, Cook County, Illinois, p. 429D.

[125] 1900 census Lake Township, Cook County, Illinois, p. 137A, dwelling # 25, family # 45.

[126] Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois, 1886, Volume III, p. 638.

[127] 1860 census Rutland Township, La Salle County, Illinois, p. 107, dwelling # 1522, family # 1531.

[128] Phoebe's obituary, The Goodland Herald, Goodland, Indiana, Saturday, March 10, 1917.

[129] Carpenter, Jasper County, Indiana, 1880 census p. 327D; 1900 census, p. 18A, dwelling & family #'s 77; 1910 census, p. 25A, dwelling and family #s 6.

[130] Information on Phoebe Ann, courtesy Toni L. Evans, Plainfield, IL.

[131] Toni L. Evans, Plainfield, IL

[132]  Allen Township, La Salle County, Illinois, p. 30B, dwelling & family #'s 120.

[133] 1880 census of Bloom Township, Cook County, Illinois, p. 430A.

[134] 1870 census Mission Twp, La Salle Co., Illinois, pp. 452A & 452B, dwelling # 169, family # 67.

[135] 1880 census Madison, Polk County, Iowa, p. 618D.

[136] Letter from William "Bill" Bagwill.

[137] 1900 census Cambridge, Furnas County, Nebraska, p. 180, dwelling # 106, family # 107.

[138] 1910 census McGill, White Pine County, Nevada, p. 235B, dwelling # 60, family # 60.

[139] 1910 census Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon, pp. 195B & 196A, dwelling # 78, family # 116.

[140] 1920 census Morgan Hill, Santa Clara County, California, p 37, dwelling # 123, family # 122.

[141] Emily B. Bagwill obituary published May 15, 1945, Berkeley Daily Gazette, Berkeley, Alameda County, California.

[142] Charles E. Vermette's death notice. Sacramento Union, December 8, 1933.

[143] California Death Index, 1940-1997.

[144] 1900 census Lake Township, Cook County, Illinois, p. 137A, dwelling # 25, family # 45.

[145] 1910 census of San Francisco, San Francisco, California, p. 87A, dwelling # 198, family # 268.

[146] 1920 census of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, p. 109A, dwelling # 166, family # 272.

[147] Charles E. Vermette was not found in the 1920 census.

[148] 1930 census of Sacramento, Sacramento, California, p. 17A, dwelling # 90, family # 97.

[149] East Lawn Cemetery Record No. 13, 491.

[150] 1870 census Lake County, Indiana, p. 177B, dwelling # 75, household # 82.

[151] 1870 census Rutland Township, La Salle County, Illinois, p. 28A, family & dwelling #s 75.

[152] 1870 census Allen Township, La Salle County, Illinois, p. 28A, dwelling & family #'s 75.

[153] Social Security Death records.

[154] 1880 census Bloom Township, Cook Co., IL, p. 429D.

[155] 1900 census Lake Township, Cook County, Illinois, p. 137A, dwelling # 25, family # 45.

[156] 1910 census of San Francisco, San Francisco, California, p. 87A, dwelling # 198, family # 268.

[157] Charles E. Vermette was not found in the 1820 census.

[158] 1930 census of Sacramento, Sacramento, California, p. 4A.

[159] East Lawn Cemetery Record No. 13, 421.

[160] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 310.

[161] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 333.

[162] History of Peoria County, Chicago: Johnson & Co., 1880, p. 606.

[163] Plainfield, IL.

[164] 1840 census Du Page Co., IL, p. 47; 1850 census Du Page Co., IL, p. 74.

[165] Worthies & Workers, Both Ministers and Laymen of the Rock River Conference, by Rev. A. D. Field, Cincinnati: Cranston & Curts printers, 1896, p. 105.

[166] 1850 census Sheboygan Township, Sheboygan Co., WI, p. 104.

[167] 1860 census Washington Township, Yolo Co., CA, p. 58.

[168] Rather than Keziah M.

[169] Document filed in the Probate Court of Yolo Co., CA, December 17, 1872.

[170] Document filed in the Probate Court of Yolo Co., CA, October 18, 1878.

[171] 1870 census, City of Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, p. 374.

[172] 1880 census, Lincoln, Placer Co., CA, p. 274D.

[173] Woodland Cemetery records. Letter in my file.

[174] Woodland Cemetery records. Letter in my file.

[175] 1870 census, Fremont Township, Yolo Co., CA, p. 476.

[176] 1880 census, Mussel Slough, Tulare Co., CA, p. 61B.



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