Kendall County Hotels

Table of Contents

 

Historical Hotels and Inns of Kendall County, Illinois 3

Au Sable 3

Milks Tavern, Wolf Tavern, and Patrick Stand 3

Bristol 3

Bristol House (a. k. a. Short Tavern) 3

Bristol Station 6

McLay Hotel 6

Goodale Hotel 7

Holderman's Grove Community 7

Levi Hills' Tavern in Holderman's Grove 7

Bartram's Old Stand 7

Lisbon 8

Birney Hotel, a.k.a. Lisbon Hotel 8

Prairie Tavern 8

Lisbon House 8

Little Rock 9

Buck Tavern 9

Inscho Tavern 9

Little Rock House 10

Toombs Hotel 10

Millbrook 10

Budd's Hotel, a. k. a. Millbrook Hotel 10

Millington 10

Austin House, a. k. a. Boyd Hotel, Kellogg House, and White's Hotel 11

Bartlett House, a. k. a. Worsley House 11

Boyd Hotel, a. k. a. Kellogg House, and Austin House 11

Harrington House, a. k. a. Neff House 12

Higby House 12

White's Hotel 12

Wilson Hotel 12

Worsley Hotel 13

Unidentified Millington Hotels 13

Newark 14

Buland Hotel 14

Hotel Convis 14

Mansion House 14

Newark Exchange Hotel, a. k. a. Lutyens House 15

Oswego 16

Hotel Collins 16

Kendall House 16

National Hotel 17

Orange House 18

Towle Stand 19

Schram House 19

Smith House 19

West Oswego Hotel 19

Unidentified Oswego Hotels 19

Pavilion 20

Ball Tavern 20

Penfield 20

Lehman Hotel 20

Plano 20

Eagle Hotel, a. k. a. Barber House, and Excelsior House 20

Excelsior House, a. k. a. Eagle Hotel, and Barber House 21

Smith House, a. k. a. Dixon House, Gage Hotel, Plano Hotel, Plano House, and Canon Ball Inn. 22

Plattville 24

Platts’ Tavern 24

Yorkville 25

Allen Hotel 25

Beck's Hotel, a. k. a. Stoffregen House, and Nading House 25

City Hotel 27

Fox River House 30

Heustis Hotel, a. k. a. Dunbar House 32

Holland Hotel 33

Nading House 33

Nading Hotel, a. k. a. Hotel Nading and Yorkville Hotel 33

Yorkville Hotel, a. k. a. Nading Hotel, and Hotel Nading 35

Index 36

 

 

Historical Hotels and Inns of Kendall County, Illinois

 

Au Sable

Milks Tavern, Wolf Tavern, and Patrick Stand

 

When stagecoaches were running, two stage routes intersected in Seward Township, the Frink and Walker stage lines between Chicago and Ottawa and Patterson stage line between Kankakee and Ottawa.

Between, November 29, 1836 and April 25, 1838 Alansing (a. k. a. Alanson) Milks and his wife Ann "Elizabeth" Milks purchased five pieces of land in Seward Township from David E. Davis. In 1836, the Milks built a tavern in section twenty-seven of the township, and both stage lines made regular stops there.1

February 3, 1838, Alansing and his wife sold the tavern to Henry Kase Stevens and his wife, Mary A. Stevens who called the tavern "Wolf Tavern."2

May 1, 1839, Stevens and his wife sold the tavern to Jacob Patrick, Sr. and his wife Eliza Patrick. The Patricks constructed a new tavern in section 33 of Seward Township, financed by a $4,000 loan from Joel A. Matteson.3 The inn and complex was on the south side of present day Holt Road, and was known as "Patrick Stand."4 The tavern became the nucleus of the community of Au Sable.

The original Patrick Stand was a substantial two-story building, but the success of the business warranted its expansion. With the extension, the tavern became a tee-shaped building approximately 32 feet deep from front to rear and 110 feet across the front. It was probably the premier inn on these stage routes. The complex around the hotel included a tavern, blacksmith shop, and other support facilities for the stagecoaches and travelers. A slaughterhouse and icehouse helped supply the traveling public and employee's needs for food and ice.

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Gray.5,6 succeeded the preceding proprietors.

Pioneer taverns/stage stops were often the focal point of the community. Since the mail was moved by stagecoach they were also a logical choice for the location of a post office. Jacob Patrick, Sr. was appointed postmaster of Au Sable on May 29, 1841. However the tavern probably served as post office much earlier. The stage stop was almost certainly the equivalent of a post office when the tavern opened in 1836. March 15, 1842 the post office was discontinued at Au Sable. May 28, 1842 the post office was reopened there with Horace Gray postmaster.

When the stagecoaches ceased to run, the hotel was converted into a private residence. In 1937 the Kroehler Furniture Company of Naperville, Illinois purchased the original portion of Patrick Stand for the black walnut used in its constructed. The north half of the building was torn down and cut up for firewood. In the same year, a kit home purchased from Sears and Roebuck Company was erected on the site to replace the old tavern.7

Bristol

Bristol House (a. k. a. Short Tavern)

 

The Bristol House was located on lots 1 and 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol.

 

June 6, 1843, John Short, Sr. purchased lots one and two, block two, original Village of Bristol, from James McClellan. The lots are located on the southwest corner of Somonauk and Center Streets. John constructed his family’s home there but later was induced to convert their home into the first tavern in Bristol, which he and his wife, Mary E. (Surre) Short, operated. The tavern was the stagecoach stop and provided a place for teamsters and others to stay. The horses that pulled the stagecoaches were exchanged at Bristol. A horse barn and pasture were located directly across the street from the hotel to accommodate the stage line, its passengers and hotel guest’s needs. The Short's daughter, Susan (Short) May, wrote an interesting account of daily life around the tavern.8 The tavern eventually became known as Bristol House.

Between July 17, 1849 and May 22, 1852; and March 15, 1854 and May 13, 1854; John Short was the Bristol postmaster and the post office was located in the tavern.

The original tavern building was dismantled before June 1864 and replaced by a new hotel building. The material from the dismantled building was used to construct four or five different dwellings in Bristol.9

 

Leonard Thorp and his wife, Eliza Thorp succeeded the Shorts in the management of the Bristol House.

 

1850 census of Bristol Township, page 273A, enumeration date September 8, family # 17.

Thorp, Leonard    49 M NY Innkeeper

Thorp, Eliza      47 F NY

Thorp, Orson L.   22 M NY Carpenter

Thorp, George W.  19 M NY Mason

Thorp, William M. 17 M NY Laborer

Thorp, Henry      14 M NY

Thorp, John       11 M NY

Thorp, Mary        8 F IL

Thorp, Martha      3 F IL

Lawrence, Martin  37 M NY Stage driver

 

 

The Thorps sold out to Raphael and Harvey Beecher. Harvey and his wife operated the hotel until they sold the property to Bradford H. and Harriet P. (Atwood) Johnson in June 1857.

 

1860 census of Bristol Township, page 126, enumeration date July 28, family # 867.

Johnson, Bradford H.         50 M MA Hotel keeper

Johnson, Harriet P. (Atwood) 39 F PA

Johnson, Margaret A.         18 F IL

Johnson, Mary Ann            16 F IL

Johnson, Milford             22 M NY

Felch, J. H.                 28 M VT Lawyer

Camp, Samuel C.              30 M NY Lawyer

Camp, Mary                   27 F NY n. g

Kimball, W.                  28 M NY Artist

Kimball, Angeline            23 F NY

 

1870 census of Bristol Township, page 47 & 337A, enumeration date June 10, family # 23.

Johnson, Bradford H.                        60 M MA Hotel keeper

Johnson, Harriet P. (Atwood)                47 F PA Keeping house

Johnson, Mary Ann                           23 F IL

Johnson, George B.                           7 M IL

Hollenback, David S. (Johnson's son-in-law) 46 M OH Farmer

Hollenback, Margaret A. (Johnson)           28 F IL

 

In September 1859, Bradford advertised the renovation of his hotel. "Bristol House, Bristol, Illinois. The subscriber would respectively inform the inhabitants of Kendall County, and the traveling public, that the above well known hotel, has been newly renovated and put in first rate order and is now open for guests, to whom he flatters himself, that by long experience, and personal attention to their wants, he can offer the comforts of a home. His stables and yards are commodious, and under the charge of experienced assistants. A comfortable Hack runs from this House to the depot (at Bristol Station) twice daily, connecting with the trains going east and west. He also keeps a team for the accommodation of persons wishing to be conveyed to any part of the county. He cordially invites all to give him a call. B. H. Johnson, September 1859."10 Bradford continued to operate the business until the Bristol House closed in September 1870.

In 1915, what was known as the Thurber estate was sold to Frank and Nelson Quinsey. The property consisted of lots one, two, seven and eight of block two of Bristol. It was the east half of block two, bound by Spring, Colton and Somonauk Streets. A note in the Record stated that the old hotel would be town down and replaced with three bungalows.11

 

The following transactions were found pertaining to lots 1 and 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol.

 

Lot 1: James McClellan to John Short, lot 1, block 2, June 6, Original Town of Bristol, 1843.

Lot 1: Title chain broken.

Lot 1: Harvey Beecher & wife to Bradford H. Johnson, lot 8, block 1, lots 1 and 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol; and fraction of northeast quarter, section 31, June 13, 1857, $750.

Lot 1: Title chain broken.

Lot 1: Rufus Hopkins & wife to Robert Hopkins lots 1 and 2, block 2, and lot 8, block 1, Original Town of Bristol; plus part of the east half of the southwest quarter of section 12, Kendall Township, August 13, 1858, $800.

Lot 1: Robert Hopkins to Bradford H. Johnson, undivided half lots 1 and 2, block 2, and lot 8, block 1, Original Town of Bristol, August 25, 1858, $665.

Lot 1: Bradford H. Johnson to David S. Hollenback, lot 8, block 1, lots 1 and 2 block 2, Original Town of Bristol, July 6, 1870, $4,000.

Lot 1: Bradford H. Johnson to Abraham Thomas lots 1 and 2, part of lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, December 21, 1874, $800.

Lot 1: Abraham Thomas to Nathaniel Y. Austin, lots 1, 2, and 43 feet off north end lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, February 16, 1876, $1,000.

Lot 1: Nathaniel Y. Austin to Eleazer H. Austin, lots 1, 2, and 43 feet off north end lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, March 12, 1877, $1,000.

Lot 1: Eleazer H. Austin to Sarah Jane Austin, lots 1, 2, and 43 feet off north end lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, March 12, 1877, $1,000.

Lot 1: Sarah Jane (Austin) Wolcott to Harvey M. Rawson, lots 1 and 2, and part of lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, July 1892, $800. Sarah Jane was Sarah Jane (Austin) (Roberts) 2nd Mrs. John C. Wolcott.

 

In October 1905, George Nichols, Newark house mover, moved the barn associated with the hotel to one side of the lot.

The Bradford Johnson house in Bristol has been sold to Mr. Abraham Thomas, George Ernst’s brother-in-law for $800. The property consisted of a large house with two and a half lots.12,13

 

Lot 1: F. E. Rawson, et al, to Harry R. Thurber, Louise Thurber, and Jennie Kauper, lots 1, 2, 7 and 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol,, $1.14

Lot 1: Harry R. Thurber, et al, to Frank Quinsey and Nelson J. Quinsey, lots 1 and 2 and north 37 ½ feet off of north ends of lots 7 and 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol,, $650.15

Lot 1: Nelson J. Quinsey to Frank Quinsey, undivided half interest in north 37 ½ feet lots 7 and 8 and south 36 ½ feet lots 1and 3, block 2, Original Town of Bristol,, $1.16

Lot 1: Frank Quinsey to Nelson J. Quinsey, half interest in part of lots 1 and 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, December 1915.

Lot 1: Nelson J. Quinsey & wife to William H. Jeter, part of lot 1, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, August 1919, $4,800.

Lot 1: Eliza Z. Jeter to Finley T. and Blanche R. Fitch, part of lot 1, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, October 1928.

 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Jeter are now located in their Bristol home where Mr. Jeter can be found by those who need an auctioneer to cry their sales.

 

The old Thurber Estate on the north side has been sold to Frank Quinsey. The old hotel part will be torn down and the building replaced by two cottages.17

Frank and Nelson Quinsey are building three new homes.18 In 1936 these homes were occupied by Frank Quinsey, Finley T. Fitch and Dr. Elliott. Frank Quinsey’s home faced on Colton Street, it appears to be located on the north half of lot 8, block 2. The Finley T. Fitch family’s home was on the corner of Somonauk and Colton Streets, facing Somonauk, on lot 1, block 2. Dr. Elliott’s home faced on Somonauk Street and was the first house west of the Fitch home, lot 2, block 2.

 

Lot 2: James McClellan to John Short, lot 1, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, June 6, 1843.

Lot 2: Title chain broken.

Lot 2: Harvey Beecher & wife to Bradford H. Johnson, lot 8, block 1, lots 1 and 2, block 2 Original Town of Bristol; and fraction of northeast quarter, section 31, June 13, 1857, $750.

Lot 2: : Rufus Hopkins & wife to Robert Hopkins, lots 1 and 2, block 2, and lot 8, block 1, Original Town of Bristol; plus part of the east half of the southwest quarter of section 12, Kendall Township, August 13, 1858, $800.

Lot 2: Robert Hopkins to Bradford H. Johnson, undivided half lots 1 and 2, block 2, and lot 8, block 1, Original Town of Bristol, August 25, 1858, $665.

Lot 2: Bradford H. Johnson to David S. Hollenback, lot 8, block 1, lots 1 and 2 block 2, Original Town of Bristol, July 6, 1870, $4,000.

Lot 2: Abraham Thomas to Nathaniel Y. Austin, lots 1, 2, and 43 feet off north end lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, February 16, 1876, $1,000.

Lot 2: Nathaniel Y. Austin to Eleazer H. Austin, lots 1, 2, and 43 feet off north end lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, March 12, 1877, $1,000.

Lot 2: Eleazer H. Austin to Sarah Jane Austin, lots 1, 2, and 43 feet off north end lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, March 12, 1877, $1,000.

Lot 2: Sarah Jane (Austin) Wolcott to Harvey M. Rawson, lots 1 and 2, and part of lot 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, July 1892, $800. Sarah Jane was Sarah Jane (Austin) (Roberts) 2nd Mrs. John C. Wolcott.

Lot 2: F. E. Rawson, et al, to Harry R. Thurber, Louise Thurber, and Jennie Kauper, lots 1, 2, 7 and 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol,, $1.19

Lot 2: Harry R. Thurber, et al, to Frank Quinsey and Nelson J. Quinsey, lots 1 and 2 and north 37 ½ feet off of north ends of lots 7 and 8, block 2, Original Town of Bristol,, $650.20

Lot 2: Nelson J. Quinsey to Frank Quinsey, undivided half interest in north 37 ½ feet lots 7 and 8 and south 36 ½ feet lots 1and 3, block 2, Original Town of Bristol,, $1.21

Lot 2: Frank Quinsey to Nelson J. Quinsey, half interest in part of lots 1 and 2, block 2, December 1915.

Lot 2: Nelson J. Quinsey to John L. Reddock, part lot 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, December 1915, $2,750.

Lot 2: John L. Reddock to Earl E. and Florence J. Byerrum, part of lot 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, November 1919.

Lot 2: Frank Quinsey to Charles H. Elliott, part of lot 2, block 2, Original Town of Bristol, April 1929.

Bristol Station

McLay Hotel

 

Alexander McLay/McLeay and his wife Margaret McLay/McLeay built and operated a hotel in Bristol Station. The hotel was the first building north of the railroad tracks on the west side of Main Street.

In 1881, storekeeper Horace Young purchased the hotel building for a storeroom.22

 

1860 census of Bristol Station, page 122, enumeration date July 28, family # 833.

McLay, Alexander    50 M Scotland Hotel keeper

McLay, Margaret     45 F Scotland

McLay, Frank        17 M IL

Knox, Lyman S.      68 M IL

Robinson, Margaret  21 F NY

Booth, Edward H.    30 M England Carpenter

Booth, Lucy (McLay) 24 F NY

Gordon, Margaret    26 F Scotland

 

Goodale Hotel

 

Lockwood W. Goodale and his wife, Abigail Catherine (Miller) Goodale ran a hotel in Bristol Station for over forty-two years.

 

1870 census of Bristol Station, page 58 & 342A, enumeration date June 14, family # 116.

Goodale, Lockwood W.                45 M MA Restaurateur

Goodale, Abigail Catherine (Miller) 36 F NY Keeping house

Goodale, Mary Elizabeth             18 F IL

Goodale, Lawson N.                  14 M IL

Goodale, Hiram J.                    6 M IL

Goodale, Sarah E. "Sadie"            3 F IL

 

Lockwood sold the hotel sometime during the early 1870s, but in 1875 he repurchased and renovated the property, reopening it as a hotel.23

 

1880 census of Huntsville (Bristol Station), page 59 & 311A, enumeration date June 18, family # 240.

Goodale, Lockwood W.                55 M self NY MA NY

Goodale, Abigail Catherine (Miller) 46 F wife NY NY NY

Goodale, Hiram J.                   16 M son IL NY NY

Goodale, Sarah E. "Sadie"           13 F dau IL NY NY

Goodale, Frederick Welch             7 M son IL NY NY

Jeffers, William R.                 21 M IL NY NY boarder

 

Holderman's Grove Community

Levi Hills' Tavern in Holderman's Grove

 

One of Frink and Walker's stagecoach routes between Chicago and Ottawa passed through Holderman's Grove. In 1833, Levi Hills, Sr. and his wife Sarah (Sears) Hills opened a log tavern in the grove, where the passengers were fed and horses exchanged.

April 4, 1834, Levi Hills, Sr. was appointed postmaster at Holderman's Grove making this the first postal facility in what became Kendall County.

In 1836, Levi moved out on the prairie to the place that became Lisbon and built a new tavern. When Hills established his tavern on the prairie, the post office at Holderman's Grove was closed.

Bartram's Old Stand

 

Jared Bartram and his wife, Elise Bartram, became proprietors of a stage stop on the Chicago to Ottawa road in Holderman's Grove which, became known as "Bartram's Old Stand." The tavern and accompanying barn were located on forty acres in section 28 of Big Grove Township at the intersection of present day White Willow and Roods Roads. The tavern had fourteen large rooms plus a number of very small rooms and a stone basement.

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander McClaskey continued to manage the tavern for several years after the Bartrams left.

When stagecoaches no longer came through the area, the tavern became a private residence. In January 1855, the property was purchased by the Elling Eielsen church group to be used as a Lutheran Seminary. The seminary was to be a school of higher education to train Norwegian ministers and teachers. Because of a split in the group, the seminary was only open for one year. When the seminary closed, the building reverted to a farm home.

Lisbon

Birney Hotel, a.k.a. Lisbon Hotel

 

Mrs. Christina (Jeffrey) Birney ran the Birney Hotel in Lisbon for eleven years. She was reputed to be an accommodating and respected innkeeper.24

In 1902, Mrs. Mary Ella Holmes purchased the Lisbon Hotel. She reopened the hotel, after making appropriate repairs, with the help of Mrs. Craig. 25

Prairie Tavern

 

In 1836, John Moore moved three miles out on the prairie and built the first house in what became Lisbon. During the same year, Levi Hills, Sr., built the second building in Lisbon, a log tavern and stage stop on the western edge of the village.26 The tavern was known far and wide as Prairie Tavern.27

Initially the road between Chicago and Ottawa was two miles north of Lisbon.28 With the tavern on the prairie, a road was needed to connect the new village with the rest of the world. A road that passed by Hills' tavern was laid out from Joliet to join the Chicago to Ottawa Road, at Holderman's Grove.

Lisbon’s first post office was located in the tavern. Levi Hills was appointed postmaster of Lisbon September 17, 1836 and served in that capacity until June 3, 1846.

Lisbon House

 

The proprietor of the Prairie Tavern was known for his hospitality and the business prospered. When the increase in business demanded it, the original log tavern was replaced with a three-story limestone building.29 The building was actually constructed by Thomas Spencer who settled in Big Grove Township in 1837.30 The new hotel was called Lisbon House, and its name was painted on the front of the building in large black letters.

When Levi Hills decided to move on, he sold the hotel to Mr. Jefferson.31

When stagecoaches ceased running through Lisbon, the tavern was closed and the Henry Sherrill family purchased the property from Mr. Jefferson, and used the building for their residence. One of the Sherrill's daughters married Dr. Burry who practiced medicine in Chicago, and for years they used the building as a summer residence.32

In 1871 the limestone house was almost destroyed by fire. The following articles recount the near loss.

"This morning at the breakfast hour, a dark column of smoke arose from our village. It lit up at intervals with leaping; red, angry flames then came the cry "fire, fire." Whose house could it be? Pails were seized and a rush made for the smoke and flames. Farmers passing with corn to Morris hitched their teams and joined the hurrying throng. A corner turned, and then at the head of the street stood the burning house. It was the residence of the Hon. Henry Sherrill. The fire originated in the attic of the kitchen, which was attached to the main building, a stone structure. Back of the kitchen was the coalhouse, filled with fuel, then adjoining was the carriage house. These buildings were of wood, which the flames seized with resistless rapidity. The flames mounted the roof of the main building, and radiated an intensity of heat that no one could endure. Little hope was entertained of saving any part of the house. A clean sweep seemed inevitable. This would have involved the certain destruction of other buildings, and where the flames, under such irresistible sweep, could be arrested, was impossible to conjecture. The village had gathered around the burning building, and they came together not as spectators to see a neighbor's house licked up by the flames, but to save it. The burning building, with sheets of flame pouring over the roof and sides sent up a column of blaze. The decisive moment had come upon which success or failure hung. With timbers and pries the burning mass was careened over, away from the principal structure. Then a dash was made for the ladders, speedily they towered up to the main roof, and brave men passed the blazing eaves, and mounted the scorching heat. Blankets were thrown over the wooden cornice that overhung the flames below. The cornice was already ablaze, and the flames were creeping into the shingles. Then came the water, a line of pails passing up the ladders, another through the house, up into the attic. It soon became evident that this courage and daring would make the stone building the protecting rampart to the rest of the street. For a few moments, "scales in even balance hung," and the position on the roof was perilous. Had a less determined effort been made at this stage of the fire, a sweeping conflagration must have been the result. Braver men never fought fire! Smoke in suffocating thickness, drove the men from the attic. But again and again they rushed into the smothering atmosphere, sending up to the peak a continuous line of water pails. These floods no flame could brave long. Soon the telling effect was marked and decisive. The angry flames were drenched. The pile of coal and fragments of the prostrate building continued burning for six hours. Then the pails returned to work until the last faint spark expired."33

"This past Saturday morning the rear part of the residence of Hon. Henry Sherrill in Lisbon was discovered to be on fire. The fire started from a defective chimney in the frame addition to his stone house, which burned. Much damage was done to the furniture in the stone house in getting it out and things were generally deranged. The loss was about $700 none of which was covered by insurance."34

The stone house that once was a bustling stage station and inn remains a private residence. The current owner's have spent many hours renovating and maintaining the old inn.

 

1860 census of Lisbon Township, page 176, enumeration date June 26, family # 1221.

VanPelt, John            32 M NJ Hotel keeper

VanPelt, Jane (Vreeland) 30 F NJ

VanPelt, Ann "Annie"      9 F NJ

VanPelt, Katie            5 F NJ

VanPelt, Tunis            3 M IL

VanPelt, Cornelius      8mo M IL

Skinner, John            30 M NY Dentist

Skinner, Catherine       30 F NY

Skinner, Charlotte      7mo F IL

Kellam, E. M.            60 M NY Teamster

Smith, John              50 M NY Tinsmith

Naden, Isabella          20 F Norway? Domestic

Little Rock

 

When Kendall County was young, Little Rock was a flourishing community and a regular stop on the stage route between Chicago and Galena, Illinois. In 1854, the editor of the Little Rock Press noted that the village had two hotels.35

Buck Tavern

 

Ephraim Buck was a widely known innkeeper who called his place Buck Tavern.

Inscho Tavern

 

Moses Inscho was supposed to have built the first stagecoach inn in Little Rock in about 1838. Inscho's inn was in a log cabin on the west side of the ford across Little Rock Creek.

Arnold Dodge, Wareham Gates, Robert Matthews, and others succeeded Moses Inscho and Ephraim Buck.36

Little Rock House

 

Josiah J. Shults came to Illinois in 1854 and settled in the village of Little Rock. Shults owned land on both sides of Galena Road with much of the land contiguous to the village. For many years, Josiah and his third wife, Elizabeth (Vedder) Shults operated a hotel in Little Rock. In about 1870 he built a new three-story red brick tavern on the north side of Galena Road. The hotel contained accommodations for travelers and a bar used by both transients and local residents. The entire third floor was open and frequently accommodated square dances and other social events. The hotel was closed to the public two or three years after it was built as the number of travelers seeking accommodations did not warrant its remaining open as a hotel.

After the inn closed it was used as a private residence. Michael Stymacks and his wife, Debra Stymacks were the most recent owners of the historic stagecoach inn. On August 24, 2001, a fire caused by a halogen lamp damaged the building beyond repair. The remains of the old inn have been completely removed and a lovely new home constructed at the rear of the lot.

Toombs Hotel

 

In the late 1840s and early 1850s, William Toombs and his wife, Alta Toombs ran a hotel in Little Rock for six or seven years. The Toombs hotel was the second building east of the Little Rock Creek on the south side of Oregon Street. On September 11, 1874, the hotel was destroyed by fire while being used as a residence by the Luke Blackmer family.37

Millbrook

Budd's Hotel, a. k. a. Millbrook Hotel

 

Jacob Budd was the driving force behind the founding and development of Millbrook. A large part of the village was built in anticipation of the coming of the railroad. In 1873, a hotel was built, which opened in January 1874.The hotel was 30 by 30 feet and 20 feet high. It was small, but said to have been well arranged. There was a parlor, dining room and kitchen on the first floor, and seven bedrooms on the second floor.

In June 1875, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Chappell moved from Yorkville to Millbrook to manage the hotel.38 In 1877, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Weeks replaced Mr. and Mrs. Chappell. The word around the community was the Weeks set the best table in the county at Budd's Hotel.39,40

In March 1880, Mr. Morrill assumed the management of the Millbrook Hotel.41

By September 1880 Mrs. Gilmore was managing the Millbrook Hotel. Mrs. Gilmore provided an excellent place to eat dinner (lunch) and the hotel was a popular place with farmers who brought grain to town from a distance.42

In 1884, Mrs. Gilmore gave up the management of the hotel and was replaced by W. Wright, who was the proprietor of the tile factory. Mr. Wright had previously operated a hotel in Chicago.43

Apparently, Mrs. Gilmore was induced to return to the hotel as Dell Lockwood succeeded her as landlord of the Millbrook Hotel. When Dell left the hotel, his brother Charles H. "Charley" Lockwood succeeded him.44

In 1887 Charles H. Lockwood resigned as the manager of the Millbrook Hotel to work for John R. Marshall as editor of the Plano Mirror.45

In January 1894 John Benthien and his wife, Elizabeth Benthien opened a hotel in the "old hotel building." One room was dedicated to a barbershop operated by Harry Benthien.

In October 1899 a disastrous fire swept through the Millbrook business district. One of the casualties was Budd's Hotel. By this time, it was apparent that a hotel in Millbrook would not be profitable enough to warrant its replacement.

Millington

 

There were two major hotels in Millington, Austin House and Worsley Hotel. Both hotels experienced several changes in management. At times the names of these hotels were changed to reflect their proprietor's names.

Austin House, a. k. a. Boyd Hotel, Kellogg House, and White's Hotel

 

Joshua N. Austin was the builder and first operator of the Austin House. In August 1873, Robert E. Mason purchased the Austin House from Joshua.

In November 1873, William H. Gunsel became the owner of the Austin House. He exchanged four hundred acres of land in Vernon County, MO for the hotel property owned by Robert E. Mason. In addition to the hotel, Mr. Gunsul ran an extensive livery stable.46

William H. Gunsel renovated the hotel, and purchased a nice billiard table for the hotel. He assured Mrs. Aldrich, a leader in the local temperance movement, that not a drop of liquor would be kept in the premises.47

When Kendall County Record, editor John R. Marshall made a trip to Millington he was invited by Mr. Gunsel to visit his hotel and have dinner.48 Mr. Marshall noted the Austin House as a new and well-arranged building. He described the office, near the front entrance, as a square room with nicely grained woodwork. There was a counter and new billiard table, but no saloon. The food was served in the dining room with a good wash room near by. Mr. Marshall described the dinner as good, and properly served. The bedrooms were described as convenient to reach, clean and orderly, good sized, and well lighted. The parlor was described as a fine room and the dance hall as a large room. John's opinion was Mr. Gunsel was an excellent landlord, and recommended the Austin House for good accommodations.49

In July 1875 the Austin House was the only hotel in Millington.50 On February 1, 1876, Will Gunsel left the Austin House.

At the time the 1876 Biographical Director of Kendall County was published, Mr. A. Horton was managing the Austin House. Apparently the sale of the hotel unraveled because in January 1877, Will Gunsel resumed management of the Austin House.51

A visitor to the Austin House described the experience. "The house of W. H. Gunsul, or Austin House, as it is commonly called, is ably kept. I found the house in good order, newly painted, clean and comfortable. The proprietor is gentlemanly and courteous, with good accommodations, and a livery stable attached to the premises. A party of ladies and gentlemen was enjoying a game of croquet. The court was in a cozy little place at the end of the house near the railroad."52

In May 1879, the Austin House was closed. It was suggested that boarders and transients could find a place to stay in Millington at the boarding house ran by Samuel J. Bartlett.53

In May 1881, George Kellogg reopened the Austin House with livery and feed stable attached and renamed the hotel, Kellogg House.54 Many visitors used the Kellogg House as a summer resort.55 In 1882, the people of Millington were happy to hear the Kelloggs had renewed their lease for a second year.56

Bartlett House, a. k. a. Worsley House

 

By October 1875, Samuel J. Bartlett and his wife, Electa J. Bartlett, had assumed the management of the Worsley hotel and changed the name to Bartlett House. See Worsley Hotel.

Boyd Hotel, a. k. a. Kellogg House, and Austin House

 

In March 1883, A. A. "Abe" Boyd assumed the management of hotel, recently managed by George Kellogg and renamed the place Boyd Hotel.57

Before reopening the hotel in August 1883, Mr. Boyd repainted, and furnished the hotel with a large amount of new furniture. Daily guests and weekly boarders used the hotel, and Mr. and Mrs. Boyd were noted as accommodating and pleasant landlords.58

In June 1888, the hotel was given a thorough cleaning from cellar to attic, papered, painted and otherwise repaired. A notice was published in the Record that he would be prepared to take boarders and open his hotel to the public in a few days. 59

In July 1888, Abe Boyd decided to move his livery business to Streator, Illinois. After moving his horses and carriages there, he was unable to obtain a suitable location for the business so he brought everything back to Millington.60

Mrs. Boyd and their children had remained in Millington while Abe was in Streator. Shortly after his return to Millington, on the night of December 14, 1888, the Boyd Hotel caught fire. The fire had a head start and was burning rapidly before its discovery, resulting in a complete loss to the building. The bulk of the furniture as well as Mr. Boyd's horses and carriages housed in an adjacent barn were saved. The building and contents were not insured creating a significant loss to the Boyd family.

The Boyd family found shelter in another Millington Hotel called the Underwood House, which was located in rooms over Pluess & Conger's store. About nine a.m. December 26, 1889, less than two weeks after the previous fire, a fire began in the attic of the Underwood House. The fire had made considerable headway before it was discovered and was impossible to extinguish. The building also housed the post office and Pluess & Conger's store. The bulk of the contents of the hotel, post office, general store, and the rooms over the store were removed. Nothing was saved from the cellar or the attic of the building. However the streets were muddy and many of the items removed were damaged. The building, owned by Mrs. J. W. Eddy, was insured for $3,000. Pluess & Conger's merchandise was insured for $4,500 and Mr. Underwood's household's goods were insured for $500.

Harrington House, a. k. a. Neff House

 

In 1890, Darius A. "Dar" Harrington moved a building from Newark to the lot across the street from the depot, and converted it into a hotel called the Harrington House.

In mid 1891, Mr. and Mrs. George Neff leased the Harrington House for a year and renamed it Neff House. In June 1891 the people of Millington and vicinity were invited to attend the grand re-opening of the hotel.61 Upon the completion of the first year's lease, Mr. and Mrs. Neff discontinued the management of the hotel.62

Beginning July 1, 1892 the owner's son, Lew Harrington, was managing the hotel whose name had reverted to Harrington House.63

By July 1896 Dar Harrington had resumed management of the hotel. In August 1899, Dar redecorated the Harrington Hotel with new paint and paper and offered accommodations for local boarders and traveling guests at reasonable rates.64,65

The Harrington House was still open in 1901-2 when it was operated by Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dobler.66

Higby House

 

The Higby House was an older hotel that had been moved from Newark and converted into a boarding house.

 

Palmer Hotel, a.k.a. Harrington House

 

Advertisement: Palmer's Hotel, Millington, Illinois. Formerly the Harrington House. Modern accommodations for all transients and boarders. Nice, clean rooms at reasonable rates. Good meals for 35 cents. Livery and feed stable in connection with hotel. A. P. Palmer Proprietor.67

White's Hotel

 

June 1, 1887, James White assumed management of one of the hotels in Millington, which was referred to as White's Hotel. James was a barber and operated a barbershop in conjunction with the hotel.68 He was still operating the hotel and barbershop in 1894.69

Wilson Hotel

 

Heronimus Krebs lived in a house across the street from the Millington Methodist Church. An addition was built on the house and his daughter Mary (Krebs) Wilson and her husband Charles Wilson used the place as a hotel. They ran a livery stable and feed store in the barn on the property, in conjunction with the hotel. Mary and Charles Wilson were still managing the hotel in July 1896.

Worsley Hotel

 

In 1871, successful businessman Timothy Worsley made a significant investment in Millington by building a new store and a large hotel named the Worsley Hotel. The hotel was directly across the street from the depot and next door to Worsley and Foster's store.70 One observer described the hotel as a large frame structure without any architectural beauty, but roomy and comfortable. The Worsley Hotel was finished in the spring of 1872 and opened the first of May.71

By October 1875, Samuel J. Bartlett and his wife, Electa J. Bartlett, had assumed the management of the hotel and changed the name to Bartlett House. At this time, Mr. Worsley refurbished the hotel with new carpets and furniture, putting it in excellent shape.72

Sometime between late 1875 and June 1877 the Worsley Hotel closed. In June 1877, the Worsleys reopened and resumed management of the hotel.73

From approximately June 1877 to August 1880, W. D. Moore managed the Worsley Hotel. By the latter date, he had left Millington to manage a hotel in Somonauk.74 At this time, Timothy Worsley resumed management of the hotel. A visitor to the hotel stated he had an excellent supper (dinner) there and was made to feel at home by the proprietors.75

In June 1881 Mr. Worsley removed the beautiful long porch in front of his hotel and replaced it with a sunshade over the door.76

In December 1881, Mr. Paul rented the Worsley Hotel and assumed its management.77,78

In 1882 the Worsley Hotel and accompanying buildings were offered for sale. The asking price was not publicized but their original cost was placed at $12,000.

Unidentified Millington Hotels

 

Which hotel properties the following comments were directed toward were not indicated but it was probably the Worsley Hotel. "Mr. Beach has moved south of Morris, and the hotel property stands vacant. What a pity this property could not be utilized for some better purpose than to be rented to different families. There is no better hotel property this side of Chicago. There is plenty of well water and a cistern that gathers sufficient rainwater. The building is substantially built with an eye to accommodate the public. But alas! How quickly it is deteriorating. Sidewalks, grounds, and outside appearances bear the mark of decay and deferred maintenance."79

 

In September 1916, Mrs. A. Hotopp opened a hotel in Millington. She began by giving the building a fresh coat of paint and installing an electric light plant.80

 

In 1880 the following people were living in the Worsley Hotel.

 

1880 census Village of Millington, page 65 & 314A, enumeration date June 4, family # 17.

Moore, W. D.     36 M self NY NY NY hotelkeeper

Moore, Kittie M. 31 F wife NY NY NY

Moore, Gracie L. 10 F dau NY NY NY

Moore, Nathan S.  5 M son NY NY NY

Whitman, Adelia  19 F IL Unk Unk servant

Huff, N. W.      33 M IL Unk Unk boarder

McAtee, William  32 M IL Unk Unk boarder

Gough, James B.  28 M OH Unk Unk boarder

Justice, Charles 32 M OH Unk Unk boarder

Justice, Arthur  28 M OH Unk Unk boarder

Ferguson, A. J.  42 M IL Unk Unk boarder

Worsley, Timothy 67 M RI Eng MA boarder

Worsley, Abigail 51 F NY CT CT boarder

 

1880 census Village of Millington, page 69 & 316A enumeration date June 5, family # 66.

Morrell, F. B.            52 M self NH NH NH hotelkeeper

Morrell, Melinda          36 M wife NY NY Can

Morrell, Raymond H.        8 M son IL NH NY

Gilson, Alexander         32 M OH Unk Unk boarder farmer

Crapley, James            55 M Eng Eng Eng boarder nurseryman

Costello, Martin          25 M NY Spa Unk boarder druggist

Wilsey, Archibald M., Jr. 26 M IL NY OH boarder clerk in store

Newark

Buland Hotel

 

In June 1887, Iver Buland opened a hotel and place of entertainment for the traveling public and citizens of Newark. The place was known as the Buland Hotel.81

Hotel Convis

 

By September 1899, DeWitt Convis was operating a hotel in Newark. In November 1905, DeWitt sold his hotel to Ed. Hextell of Helmar who took possession of the hotel January 1, 1906.82 By August 1909, the Hotel Convis had been closed.83

 

Mansion House

 

Lyman Smith built the Mansion House in northeast Newark. It was there as early as 1843 but was probably in operation before that date.

In 1850, Mathias Beaupre was operating a hotel in Newark. The name of hotel is unknown to the compiler, but was probably the hotel built by Lyman Smith.

In August 1881, Artemis S. (A. S.) Halbert was the proprietor of a hotel in Newark.84 On May 31 1887, Mr. Halbert gave up the management of the hotel.85 Halbert's hotel was probably in the Mansion House.

 

1850 census of Big Grove Township, page 290A, enumeration date September 2, family # 119.

Beaupre, Mathias 36 M Canada Innkeeper

Beaupre, Sarah   29 F Canada

Beaupre, Charles  8 M IL

Beaupre, William  6 M IL

Beaupre, Sarah    3 F IL

Unknown, Louisa  10 F Germany

Wood, S. D.      23 M NY

Unknown, Samuel  37 M NY

Unknown, Charles 28 M NY

Burns, Louis R.  28 M NY

Burns, Laura     20 F NY

Misner, Asbury   20 M IL

Norman           19 M IL

Eliza            18 F Canada

John             25 M NY

 

1880 census Big Grove Township (Newark), page 28 & 295B, enumeration date June 24, family # 273.

Halbert, Artemis S.            42 M self NY MA CT hotelkeeper

Halbert, Margaret E. (Brauman) 38 F wife OH Ire Ire

Halbert, Addie                 18 F dau OH NY OH

Halbert, Edith May             16 F dau OH NY OH

Halbert, Robert L.             11 M son OH NY OH

Neck, Jack                     28 M Eng Eng Eng boarder

Cunningham, J.                 42 M Ire Ire Ire boarder

Levy, Lewis                    24 M Ger Ger Ger boarder

Brown, H. N.                   36 M VT VT VT boarder

Yandal, A. S.                  40 M Nor Nor Nor boarder

Newark Exchange Hotel, a. k. a. Lutyens House

 

In 1831, Walter Stowell and Susan (Butler) Stowell and their family migrated to Du Page County. When they first arrived they occupied a double log house with the Paul Hawley family near the present site of Naperville. They soon erected a log house of their own a mile from Hawley's on the Chicago and Ottawa road where they kept a tavern and post office. In 1834 the family came to Kendall County where for many years, Walter Stowell was a prominent tavern keeper, postmaster and farmer at Newark.

Walter Stowell erected two taverns or hotels in Newark. Both were on the corner of Johnson and Main Streets, known locally as hotel corner. The first tavern was constructed in 1836 and opened in 1837. Hotels typically had "license to keep tavern." A license to keep tavern permitted innkeepers to sell liquor by the drink. They were also able to sell liquor by the quart, gallon, or barrel and to treat their customers to drinks.

The teams of horses that pulled the stagecoaches were always exchanged at Newark. Hence the name Newark Exchange Hotel. In a year or two, the first tavern was inadequate to meet the traveling public's, and local citizen's needs, so a second and larger hotel was built across the street.

In 1840, an addition, which faced Johnson Street was added to the rear of the second building. In the mid 1850s, a three-story building, which faced Main Street was attached to the 1840 addition to accommodate stagecoach passengers and drivers. In the days of the stagecoach, the Newark Exchange Hotel was a lively place. Even though the hotel was an enormous building there were times when it was difficult to accommodate all of the guests. It was said there were as many as 100 guests at one time.

Walter Stowell was postmaster of Newark between May 15, 1839 and Mar 7, 1846 and the post office was located in the Newark Exchange Hotel.

As early as November 1843, William Lutyens was the proprietor of the Newark Exchange Hotel and associated livery stable. While the hotel was typically referred to as the Exchange Hotel, Lutyens called the hotel Lutyens House. When the Railroad came through the Fox River Valley in 1871, stagecoaches ceased to make the Chicago to Ottawa run. From that point forward there were seldom more than half a dozen guests in the hotel at any one time.

The Newark Exchange Hotel burned to the ground Saturday morning, April 27, 1878. The fire originated from a defective flue, and spread to the tar roofing, which had been re-covered by shingles. The fire smoldered in the roofing until it burst into flames and became out of control. In an hour nothing was left of the building but ashes. The furniture and other removable articles, and many of the doors and windows were saved from destruction. The building was uninsured and the owner, Irus Coy experienced a total loss.86

At the time of the 1850 census, the following people were living in the Newark Exchange Hotel. Unfortunately, the surnames of the residents were not provided.

 

1850 census of Big Grove Township, page 288A, enumeration date August 30, family # 84.

Stowell, Walter  61 M CT Innkeeper

Stowell, Eliza   23 F OH

Stowell, Mila    21 F OH

Stowell, Susan   19 F IL

Ephraim          53 M NY

Abraham          25 M NY

Charles          25 M NY

George           30 M NY

Jacob            28 M OH

Ralph            51 M CT

David            21 M OH

Hiram            24 M NY

Frederick        40 M PA

Timothy          42 M PA

Elsa             38 F PA

Nicholas         42 M Ireland

Johanna          40 F Ireland

Peter            24 M Germany

John             24 M NY

Evan             23 M Wales

Nicholas         21 M PA

Michael          22 M Ireland

William          25 M PA

 

At the time of the 1860 census, William F. Lutyens was the manager of the Newark Exchange Hotel, which he called Lutyens House.

 

1860 census of Big Grove Township, page 83, enumeration date July 7, family # 585.

Lutyens, William F.     42 M PA Hotel keeper

Lutyens, Hannah (Smith) 38 F PA

Lutyens, Lyman          20 M IL

Lutyens, Clifford       12 M IL

Lutyens, Lillie Belle    3 F IL

Bull, John              40 M Eng ng

Clellin, James          24 M IL Wagonmaker

Watson, George W.       37 M PA Lawyer

McClue, G. W.           40 M NY Harness maker

Kilmore, C. M.          20 M NY Teamster

Hull, Azariah Z.        28 M NY Saloon keeper

Nichols, Daniel P.      24 M NY Physician

Cook, J. B.             30 M MI Farm hand

Monk, William           36 M Baden Farm hand

Morgan, D. C.           23 M IL Farmer

Morgan, Juliet          20 F IL

Oswego

Hotel Collins

 

In the spring of 1895, Henry J. Collins began converting the Oswego roller skating rink into a hotel, but died before the hotel was ready to open.87

Following Henry's death, his widow Carrie Collins completed the remodeling and managed the hotel.88In March 1896, Carrie married Charles Wilcox, closed the hotel, and moved to Aurora.89

Kendall House

 

Wright Murphy came to Oswego from Bangor, Maine, and built the Kendall House on lots 1 and 4, block 7 the northeast corner of Adams and VanBuren Streets.

Erasmus D. Bradley leased the Kendall House to Curtis M. Butler January 14, 1850. He continued to operate Kendall House until March 1, 1853.

From 1852-1854, Mathias Beaupre was sheriff of Kendall County. Beginning March 1, 1853, in addition to his duties as sheriff, he assumed the management of Kendall House, and he and his wife moved into the hotel. Oswego was the county seat, but did not have a county jail. When prisoners needed to be held on a short-term basis such as, punishment for minor offenses or for court appearances, Sheriff Beaupre housed them in the hotel guestrooms on the second floor.

On July 19, 1854, J. C. Chapman became the proprietor of the Kendall House.90

In July 1880, there was a comment in the Record, that Mr. Farley was constructing two houses from the main portions of the old Kendall House.91

 

1850 census Oswego Township, pages 235B and 236A, enumeration date September 30, family # 59.

Butler, Curtis M.    37 M NY Innkeeper

Race, Eliza          39 F NY

Ferriss, Richard R.  23 M NY Laborer

Cowen, Amelia        20 F NY

Cole, Jeremiah J.    44 M RI Pensioner

Cole, Mary A.        40 F RI

Butler, Harriet      18 F NY

VanSickle, Henry     27 M NY Blacksmith

Boss, James          23 M NY Laborer

Kellogg, Abel H.     35 M NY Constable

Townsend, Charles D. 32 M NY Merchant

Ferriss, Charles     24 M NY Laborer

Chapman, James W.    34 M NY Mason

National Hotel

 

In 1842, brothers Samuel and Thomas Tompkins92 built the National Hotel on Main Street in the center of the Oswego business district. The National was the first hotel in Oswego although smaller taverns had been built earlier.

In August 1843 Wright Murphy leased the National Hotel from George T. Hopkins.

William Briggs succeeded Wright Murphy as manager of the National Hotel. In 1853, Briggs completely remodeled the hotel adding several guestrooms to the older part of the hotel and a new 30 by 40-foot two-story addition. There was also a stable in conjunction with the hotel where traveler's horses could be fed and cared for.

In January 1856, Mathias Beaupre who had managed the Kendall House, succeeded William Briggs as manager of the National Hotel. Beaupre remained the landlord until June 1, 1862 when Moses J. Richards became the proprietor. Moses owned and managed the National Hotel until it was destroyed by fire February 9, 1867. The same fire consumed a significant portion of the Oswego business district. By great effort, most of the hotel furniture and the barns belonging to the hotel were saved. The fire undoubtedly was a severe financial blow to Moses as he declared bankruptcy in April 1869.

One of the National Hotel's claims to fame was, when Oswego became the county seat, Judge Caton held the first court in Oswego in the hotel.

At the time of the 1850 census the following members of the Briggs family, their staff and guests were living at the National Hotel.

 

1850 census of Oswego Township, pages 237 A & B, enumeration date October 1, family # 83.

Briggs, William       39 M VT Innkeeper

Briggs, Cecelia       32 F NY

Danforth, William Jr. 11 M NY

Danforth, Martha       6 F NY

Towle, Martha         64 F NY

Burkhart, Frederick   18 M Germany Hostler

Barber, Sheldon       26 M NY Bookkeeper

Herrick, Harriet      40 F NY

Stockton, Mary        32 F NY

Hemm, Barbara         25 F Germany

Herrick, Jane          4 F IL

Herrick, Oscar         2 M IL

Bradley, Erasmus D.   30 M NY Constable

Miller, Richard D.    25 M NY Merchant

Fenton, Marcus A.     39 M NY Postmaster

Denton, John M.       36 M Canada Carpenter

Burdick, Hiram        26 M NY Carpenter

Sanders, Samuel       38 M NY Grocer

Rank, Lorenzo         23 M Germany Tailor

Turner, John          42 M NY Wheelwright

Massey, Robert        28 M NY Painter

Murphy, Alexander     26 M NY Painter

Johnson, Patrick      44 M Ireland Mason

Perry, William        24 M NY Carpenter

 

In 1860, Mathias Beaupre was the proprietor of the National Hotel.

 

1860 census of Oswego, page 279, enumeration date August 22, family # 1884.

Beaupre, Mathias     46 M Canada Hotel keeper

Beaupre, Sarah       39 F Canada

Beaupre, Charles E.  20 M IL

Beaupre, William     16 M IL

Beaupre, Sarah       14 F IL

Beaupre, Arthur       7 M IL

Beaupre, Eben         2 M IL

Schiller, Margaret   17 F Baden Domestic

Weber, Mary          15 F Baden Domestic

Parke, A. C.         67 M NY Barkeeper

Hall, Asher B.       26 M NJ

Kennedy, Joseph D.   32 M MA

Danforth, William T. 20 M NY Cooper

Wicks, James         24 M Ireland Cooper

Stafford, Henry      20 M VT Painter

Rank, Lorenzo        25 M Bavaria Clerk

Barney, James        21 M Canada Laborer

VanDorston, John P.  22 M NJ Lawyer

Danforth, Charles    42 M VT Cooper

Jackson, William     25 M NY Agent

Long, R.             21 M IL Carpenter

Orange House

 

John P. Yard owned and operated the Orange House in Oswego. On October 30 1850, he deeded the three acres “on which the Orange House stands” to Samuel Roberts. This is probably the same hotel as the West Oswego Hotel.

 

1850 census of Oswego Township, page 248A, enumeration date October 7, family # 230.

 

Yard, John P.        48 M England Innkeeper

Yard, Juliet         45 F England

Yard, Fanny          16 F England

Yard, Lavinia "Vina" 13 F England

Yard, Mary Ann        9 F England

Yard, Grace           7 F England

Yard, James           3 M IL

Hicks, James         23 M Germany Farmer

Fatsen, John         28 M Germany

Fatsen, Christopher  23 M Germany

Fatsen, Sophia       19 F Germany

Towle Stand

 

One of the first buildings built in Oswego was a small log tavern built by Decoliar Towle in 1838, known as Towle Stand.

Schram House

 

In April 1893 there was a notice in the Oswego column of the Record that John Bartlett had quit the hotel business and that the Schram House was for rent.93

Smith House

 

At the time of the 1860 census, Ezra Smith's occupation was listed as shoemaker. By 1870, Ezra and his second wife, Mary "Caroline" (Stebbins) Smith were proprietors of the Smith House hotel, which was located on the north side of South Main Street in downtown Oswego. The original building is currently located behind the Dari Hut on South Main Street and used as a private residence.

Ezra died January 24, 1871 and his wife continued to operate the hotel until sometime after 1880. She died March 14, 1894 in the Elgin State Hospital.

 

1870 census of Oswego Township, page 292 & 459B, E.D. August 16

332 Smith, Ezra                   71 M MA Hotelkeeper

Smith, Mary "Caroline" (Stebbins) 51 F VT Keeping house

Smith, Dwight E.                  19 M IL Hotel work

Murphy, Anna A.                   19 F IL Domestic servant

 

1880 census of NY Oswego Township (Oswego Village), page 252 & 409B, E.D. June 22.

Smith, Mary "Caroline" (Stebbins) 61 F VT VT MA Keeping hotel

Ashley, Emerson                   40 M IL VT NY (son) Shells corn

Cefus, Rosa                       17 F IL Ger Ger Servant

Perry, Susan                      64 F MA MA VT Boarder

Grimes, James S.                  73 M MA Eng Eng Temperance Lecturer

West Oswego Hotel

 

The West Oswego Hotel was across the Fox River from Oswego about a half mile from the Oswego business district. For several years the hotel was owned and managed by Samuel Roberts.

In September 1852, Roberts offered the hotel, nearby store and blacksmith shop for sale. In January 1853, William Henry Strossman became the proprietor of the hotel.

In November 1856, Samuel Roberts entered into an agreement selling the West Oswego Hotel and the five and a half acres it was situated on to Aaron Mason for $3,000.

Unidentified Oswego Hotels

 

At the time of the 1850 census of Oswego Township, Curtis M. Butler was the manager of Kendall House, and William Briggs was the proprietor of the National Hotel. In addition to these two hotels, James Scott, Jr. was managing an unidentified hotel in Oswego.

 

1850 census of Oswego Township page 232A, enumeration date September 28, family # 1.

Scott, James Jr.    33 M Scotland Innkeeper

Scott, Julia        24 F NY

Scott, Delphinia     3 F IL

Hayden, Jackson     35 M NY Tailor

Ralston, Joseph     40 M PA Tailor

Mudgett, Edwin      28 M NY Lawyer

Pearce, Abel        50 M NY Laborer

Nellis, John        40 M Ireland Laborer

Taylor, Mary        30 F Germany

Taylor, Franklin     4 M IL

Atkins, Ann Eliza   20 F NY

Scott, Sarah        60 F Scotland

Scott, Sarah        25 F NY

Bond, Henry         28 M England Teamster

 

 

In 1860, H. Bass was the proprietor of a hotel in Oswego.

 

1860 census of Oswego, page 241,enumeration date August 13, family # 1632.

Bass, H.       76 M MA Hotel keeper

Bass, Anna     41 F VT

Bass, Robinson 22 M PA

Bass, George    3 M IA

 

Pavilion

Ball Tavern

 

The village of Pavilion was on the stage route between Chicago and Ottawa. John Ball operated an inn and exchange barn there providing a place for the passengers to rest and get something to eat before continuing their journey.

When Gerald E., Matlock, Sr. married Lillian E. Ward, Ball's tavern was moved to the Matlock farm at the intersection of Illinois State Route 71 and Pavilion Road to become their first home. Later the old tavern was replaced by a new home.

Penfield

Lehman Hotel

 

Penfield was a small community on the River Road in section 34, Little Rock Township. In about 1842 Josiah Lehman opened a stage stop and hotel there between the mouth of the Big Rock and Rob Roy Creeks. Josiah was postmaster of Penfield from July 16, 1842 until January 7, 1854, and the post office was kept in the hotel.

The hotel remained open until stagecoaches stopped using the River Road on their journey between Chicago and Ottawa.

Plano

Eagle Hotel, a. k. a. Barber House, and Excelsior House

 

John C. Barber built the Eagle Hotel in 1854. The hotel was located on the corner of Main and Plain Streets near the railroad depot in the Plano business district. The hotel was 74 feet long, with three stories in the front, and two stories in the rear of the building. It was famous for its good food, bar, and the dances given in the large ballroom. Public dances were usually held on the Fourth of July and New Years Eve. A number of advertisements for the hotel were found in surviving issues of the Kendall County Journal published at Plano. In the spring of 1856 John wanted to retire and leased the hotel to his son-in-law, Mr. Bullock, who had married his daughter, Julia Ann Barber. John retained ownership of the hotel property.94

Excelsior House, a. k. a. Eagle Hotel, and Barber House

 

In 1862, Hazard W. Kendall, who had previously been in the hotel business, moved from Kaneville, IL to Plano and assumed management of the hotel, which he called the Excelsior House. For the next two years the Excelsior House was the only hotel in Plano.

In the spring of 1865, Edwin J. Beck purchased and remodeled the Excelsior House.95 His life ended unexpectedly in November 1866 when he died of typhoid fever.96 After the death of Mr. Beck, James H. Dixon assumed the management of the hotel.

In 1867, John C. Barber was the proprietor of a billiard hall and saloon in the hotel. In August of 1867, he repurchased the Excelsior House for $1,950, subject to a $3,260 mortgage.97

James H. Dixon continued to operate the hotel until January 1869, when he turned the hotel back to John C. Barber.98

By August 1872 Charles Flanders was the proprietor of the Excelsior House. He remodeled the hotel and quickly filled it with boarders. Manufacturing was prospering in Plano and the hotel was near the shops making it an excellent place for the mechanics to live. The Excelsior House was also a popular stop for traveling men.

Edward J. Robbins and William R. Lowe rented the Excelsior House in October 1872. They celebrated the occasion by having a Grand Opening dance with a full band. An interesting comment in the announcement was the "Excelsior has the best spring floor of any hall in the country."99

In 1873, Albert Heavener became the proprietor of the Excelsior House. Before reopening the hotel on July 10, 1873 the Excelsior House was completely redecorate with new paint, paper, carpets, and furniture.100

In late October 1874, Herman N. Kennedy and his brother-in-law, Austin W. Rapelje, were managing the Excelsior House. The hotel was thoroughly renovated and repaired before reopening.101

Beginning July 1, 1875, Samuel J. Bartlett, who previously ran a hotel in Millington leased the Excelsior House for five years.102 Upon assuming his lease the hotel was again extensively remodeled and generally spruced up. Among other changes, an outside stairway was built off of Plain Street for a second floor entrance. The second story hall, used for various kinds of meetings and dances, could now be entered without going through the hotel.103

In February 1877, Mr. Al. P. Rogers of Aurora leased the Excelsior House.104

In February 1878, the Excelsior House was leased to Charles Flanders of Waterman, IL.105

In February 1880, Charles Flanders returned to his farm near Waterman, IL and Jacob Passage became the landlord of the Excelsior House.106 Mr. Passage did not operate the hotel very long and a successor was not found. The hotel was closed, but some of the space in the building was rented to various businesses.

On March 24, 1881, the Excelsior House was destroyed by fire. Some passing trainmen saw the smoke pouring from Kendall's cider saloon (beer and hard cider) in the basement of the hotel and the alarm was sounded.

William Bradley heard the fire alarm and started downtown where he observed the smoke pouring from the building. He tried to open the saloon door but it was locked so he broke it open. The room was filled with smoke and a fire was burning on the floor. The smoke was so dense, he was unable to extinguish the blaze. A crowd gathered and began to help fight the blaze. When the doors and windows of the building were opened, the flames originally confined to the basement, spread to the entire building.

At the time of the blaze, George M. Wheat had a harness shop in the rear of the building and Hazard W. Kendall had a saloon in the southwest corner of the basement. There were no other occupants of the building. The building was old, dry as tinder, and it burned with amazing speed.

The intense heat of the burning building and the fact that it was three stories high made it a formidable fire. The flames and heat leaped across the street where there were five frame stores in a row with another frame building behind them. The fire made quick work of them. It was immediately clear that all that could be saved was their contents and other nearby buildings.

The hotel was uninsured, and John C. Barber sustained the greatest loss. Most of the owners of the destroyed real estate decided to rebuild immediately, and to replace their frame buildings with brick buildings. The Excelsior House was not rebuilt.107

 

1860 census of Little Rock Township page 327, enumeration date July 25, families # 2214 and 2215.

Family 2214:

Barber, John Calvin         43 M NY Hotel keeper

Barber, Catherine           40 F NY

 

Family 2215:

Eldridge, John C.           29 M NY Hotel keeper

Eldridge, Mary J. (Henning) 23 F IL

Henning, Charles            20 M NY Farm hand

Henning, Josephine          22 F NY

Fetter, William             24 M OH Teacher

Faxon, L.                   22 M NY Mason

Faxon, Rodney D.            24 M NY Mason

Willett, Jane A.            26 F Scotland Milliner

Smith House, a. k. a. Dixon House, Gage Hotel, Plano Hotel, Plano House, and Canon Ball Inn.

 

In 1868, Henry "Hank" Smith and his brother built a new brick hotel at the corner of Main and West Streets in downtown Plano.108,109 The hotel contained twenty-four, large, light, and airy bedrooms. The hotel was centrally located across the street from the railroad depot, and located within easy reach of all places of business, and the post office.

In February 1869, James H. Dixon and his brother Andrew P. Dixon purchased the Smith House for $8,500, and assumed possession March 1, 1869.110 At that time, the name of the hotel was changed to Dixon House. The Dixon brothers managed the hotel for a couple of years, but in April 1871 James H. decided to seek his fortune elsewhere and sold his interest to Charles Shibley of Oswego.111 Andrew P., continued to own the hotel while leasing it to others.

By August 1872, George Goss and his wife Mary (Lathrop) Gosswere managing the hotel. According to Mrs. Goss's obituary, they traded a farm in Iowa for the hotel and owned it for seven years. Under the Goss's management, the hotel was a temperance house.112

Mr. Goss advertised that he was always ready to administer to the comfort of his guests and boarders. That his specialty was to provide good accommodations for transient guests and traveling businessmen. Board was $1.50 per day.113

Mr. Goss apparently was succeeded by Mr. A. Cary who operated the hotel for a while before selling out to Mr. H. Woodward in July 1873.114

In March 1879, George Goss was again the proprietor of the Dixon House.115 The Dixon House fell on hard times. The building was not properly maintained and deteriorated badly making it less attractive to boarders and guests, and finally closed.

In April 1880 the Dixon House and Dixon Hall were sold at Master's sale.116 Lewis Steward purchased the property for $3,200.117 He felt a good hotel was an essential element in Plano's ability to grow and prosper. When Mr. Steward became the owner, extensive renovations and remodeling to both the interior and exterior were performed. The roof was replace, the front wall was rebuilt, a veranda was built across the front, a cornice was installed on the exterior, a new ceiling was installed in the interior, and a flagstone sidewalk was constructed in front of the hotel.118,119

In addition to dining facilities and rooms for guests, here was a large hall or ballroom in the Dixon Hotel. The hall was utilized for concerts, dances, lectures, parties, public exhibitions, and shows.120,121 The interior was completely renovate and a balcony added to the hall. Light in the remodeled hall was provided by eight chandeliers, which gave it a pleasant and cheerful appearance. The Dixon House was completely renovated from top to bottom and newly re-furnished. The work required several months, but upon completion the building was in excellent condition, and the rooms were said be cheerful and inviting in appearance.

In late 1880, Frank Lull became the manager of the Dixon House at which time he changed the name of the place to Plano House. On New Year's eve 1880, a grand party was held to dedicated the newly rebuilt Dixon Hall. Many of Plano's most prominent citizens attended. The Somonauk string band provided the music. Mr. and Mrs. Lull furnished supper (dinner) for the party guests.122

In November 1882, Lewis Steward sold the Plano House and Hall to Hazard W. Kendall who continued to own the hotel until 1896 when he sold out and retired.

Following the sale of the hotel Mr. Steward invested the proceeds in the erection of a brick building on the corner of the next block east on land purchased from Edgar L. Henning. The new building contained an opera house, and the Plano town hall.

The Kendall County News published a note that Mrs. Lull was leaving the Plano House and Mr. Pulfrey of Michigan would assume possession by December 10, 1884.123

In May 1885, Mr. Pulfrey gave up and returned to Michigan. The owner of the hotel, Hazard W. Kendall, resumed its management.124

In 1885, Mr. Kendall renovated the Plano House by papering, painting, and repairing everything necessary to put the hotel in first-class order.125 When the restoration was completed the Mead Brothers became the managers of the hotel. In January 1889, the Mead Brothers relinquished the management of the Plano House in favor of Samuel Harp.126

In August 1891, Mr. Warner who had been in the hotel business in Kewanee, Illinois, became proprietor of the hotel.127

In March 1896, Lewis Steward repurchased the Plano Hotel and Hall, and placed Julian Steward in charge. The hotel had changed hands many times during the previous twenty-five years, and had been closed part of the time. The hall was thoroughly remodeled, and the name changed to Steward Hall or Steward Opera House.128 A number of changes were made to the Opera House. The walls and ceiling are painted apple green color with a terra cotta base. New scenery and a handsome drop curtain were installed. Familiar local scenes were painted on either side of the curtain. On the right side, the old white bridge was depicted. On the left side, there was a view of the old bulkhead north of the mill. The lighting system was updated, and the stage and dressing rooms were put in good repair.129

Lewis Steward died in August 1896, and the Plano House became the property of the Steward Estate. In September 1898, it was re-open with Robert C. Bristol of Chicago the manager. Noted improvements were made. The hotel was modernized with running water, bathrooms, electric lights and steam heating. The kitchens and dining rooms were brought up to date, and a porter was hired to serve guest's needs. The beds were the best money could buy. The hotel had a spacious office, plus sample and sitting rooms. It was hoped that with the remodeling, the hotel would attract more travelers. It was anticipated that a large part of the meat and produce used in the dining facilities would be raised on Steward farms and would be of the highest quality. The food served under Mr. Bristol's supervision was appetizing and served in a courteous manner, and Sunday dinners were popular with local residents.

Mr. Bristol was known as a congenial host and made his patrons feel welcome.130 Mrs. Lizzie Smith was part of his management team. The Plano House was described as one of the best moderate priced hotels "on the road", but the hotel was unable to turn a profit.131

In May 1901, management of the Plano Hotel changed again when Mrs. D. Nelson leased the Plano House and Steward Opera House from the Steward Estate for three years.132 For several years she had successfully conducted a hotel across the street from the Deering works in Chicago. Apparently, Mrs. Nelson was unable to make the hotel a financial success. Maintenance was deferred and the hotel became badly run down.

In May 1902, the Plano Hotel was purchased from the Steward estate by Mrs. Mary L. Caskey of Richmond, Illinois.133 Her son, George B. Caskey, assumed management of the hotel. Mr. Caskey had successfully operated hotels in Burlington and Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.134 He tried to put everything back in good order to attract patrons, but a year and a half later, he decided the Plano House was not going to be a financial success.

On January 1, 1903 the hotel was sold to Mr. Henry L. Jacobson and his wife Jenny Jacobson of Wichita, KS. The Jacobson's took possession January 1, 1903.135 The real estate transfer was recorded in January 1903. Sarah L. Caskey to H. L. Jacobson part lots five and six, block eight, Plano. Consideration $5,500.136

Twenty years before purchasing the hotel, Henry L. had passed up and down the Fox River Valley as a trainman on the Fox River Railroad. Later he lived in Paw Paw, IL for several years before moving to Wichita.137 Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson continued to manage the Plano House until at least December 28, 1904.

In July 1907, Valentine Cooper and his wife, of Chicago, purchased and become proprietors the Plano House. Shortly after they took over the property they renovated the hotel, enlarged the dining room, and cleaned and painted every room in the hotel. Their son Ambrose Cooper later became a prominent businessman in Plano, where he lived the remainder of his life.

By 1912, Mr. and Mrs. William Dolder were the owners of the Plano Hotel. At this time the hotel lease was held by Mr. McEmry. The Dolders bought out McEmry’s lease and completely remodeled and refurnished the hotel. At the same time the bought out Peter Loser’s lease and license of the saloon located in the basement of the hotel, which the Dolders ran in conjunction with the hotel.138

By June 1916, C. E. Marquis of Jefferson, Iowa had purchased the Plano Hotel from Mr. and Mrs. Ben Newman who moved to Grand Haven, Michigan where Mr. Newman had accepted employment.139

In 1920, the Plano House was renamed Cannon Ball Inn in reference to the newly named Cannon Ball Trail, which passed through Plano. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Gaisser were the proprietors. They remodeled the hotel and invited the public to view the results. Those who attended the reopening were pleased with the quality of the dinner served and the neat and clean appearance of the facility.140

In June 1927 Harry Shannon owned the Canon Ball Inn. He sold the inn to Mr. M. Fiddler and Joseph Blake of Aurora, exchanging the property for four bungalows in Aurora, and additional cash. The new owners remodeled, redecorated and refurbished the hotel. Mr. and Mrs. L. Guy Suydam leased the kitchen and dining rooms, and were in charge of the food service.141

In November 1936, Mr. and Mrs. L. Guy Suydam assumed the management of the Canon Ball Inn. Apparently the dining room downstairs had been closed but was reopened. Several families lived in housekeeping apartments in the hotel and more moved in with the change in management. Travelers used other rooms on a day to day basis.142

 

1880 census of Little Rock Township (Plano), page 176 & 370B, enumeration date June 2-3, family # 61.

Goss, George            56 M self VT VT VT hotelkeeper

Goss, Mary E. (Lathrop) 45 F wife VT VT VT

Goss, Mary Lathrop      17 F dau VT VT VT

Goss, Lock A.           15 M son VT VT VT

Goss, George B.          9 M son IA VT VT

Goss, Edna L.            3 F dau IL VT VT

Goss, Lee Anderson     8mo M son IL VT VT

 

1880 census of Little Rock Township (Plano), page 178 & 371B, enumeration date June 3, family # 71.

Passage, Jacob         49 M self NY NY NY hotelkeeper

Passage, Jane          41 F wife NY NY NY

Passage, James         25 M son NY NY NY hotelkeeper

Passage, Newton        19 M son IL NY NY

Passage, Jacob R.       6 M son IL NY NY

Wormley, Ida (Passage) 22 F dau IL NY NY

Passage, Anna (Davis)  24 F dau-in-l IL WV NY

Passage, Charles      2mo M gr-son IL NY IL

 

Plattville

Platts’ Tavern

 

In 1834, Daniel Jesse Platt and Esther (Ricketson) Platt founded the village of Plattville. Their home was on the Frink and Walker stage route between Chicago and Ottawa, and shortly after they arrived in Plattville, Mr. and Mrs. Platt built a log stage station and tavern. This was followed by a wood frame building, and finally by a 33 by 43 foot two-story limestone building built in 1842 on the site of the original log tavern. Passengers, stagecoach drivers, and teamsters looked forward to stopping there as Mrs. Platt was as a good cook and Mr. Platt was a genial and accommodating landlord.

Daniel Platt was appointed postmaster November 4, 1847 and held the position until July 15, 1851. During his tenure the Plattville post office was kept in the tavern.

When the stagecoaches stopped coming through Plattville, the inn became a private residence. In 1927, the old limestone building was removed and replaced by a new home on the site.

Yorkville

Allen Hotel

 

The Allen Hotel was located on lot 5, block 1 of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. It was on the northwest corner of Bridge and Van Emmon Streets and was originally called the Holland Hotel. See Holland Hotel.

 

The following transactions were found pertaining to lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 5: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1865, $2,500.

Lot 5: Washington Thomas, et al, to Jacob P. Black, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 18, 1868, $2,600.

Lot 5: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to William R. Newton, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1899, $1,400.

Lot 5: William R. Newton to William Remmers, part of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1901, $650.

Lot 5: William R. Newton to George M. Pederson, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1911, $2,500.

Lot 5: George M. Pederson to Fred W. Simpson, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1912, $2,500.

Lot 5: Fred W. Simpson to Edward F. Hahnenstein, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1912.

Lot 5: Perry W. Penman and Edward F. Hahnenstein to Robert A. McClelland, part of lots 5 and 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1914.

Lot 5: Heirs of Robert A. McClelland to Sophus J. Wittrup, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1920, $3,500.

Lot 5: Heirs of Elias A. Black to Sophus J. and Mabel C. Wittrup, lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1920.

 

Beck's Hotel, a. k. a. Stoffregen House, and Nading House

 

In the 1850s there were two hotels south of the old courthouse at the intersection of Fox and Main Streets. The hotel on the southeast corner was on Lot 2, Block 11 and faced Main Street. The hotel on the northeast corner was on Lot 8, Block 14, and faced Fox Street. It is known that Solomon Heustis built and operated the hotel on the southeast corner.143 He probably built and operated both of these hotels.

May 1, 1862, Alvah Beecher purchased the hotel on the northeast corner of Fox and Main Streets from Solomon Heustis. On November 12, 1866, George Beck and his wife, Albertina (Horst) Beck purchased the same hotel from Alvah Beecher. George and Albertina were successful hotel operators and their hotel was well patronized.144 The bulk of the Beck's patronage was from regular boarders and those who came to Yorkville to transact business at the courthouse.145

In the fall of 1870, George visualized better prospects in the brewery business, and sold the hotel to Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Ahrens.146 At this time, Henry Stoffregen became the manager of the hotel, which was renamed Stoffregen House. In October 1871, Ernst Ahrens advertised the hotel for sale. "The hotel in Yorkville, known as the "Stoffregen House" formerly Beck's is offered for sale at a bargain. It is a fine large building with barn and two lots. For terms apply to the owner, Ernst Ahrens, Yorkville, P. O., or at the hotel any Saturday afternoon. Furniture and fixtures for sale also."147

In February 1873, George and Albertina leased the hotel to C. E. Beaupre, of De Kalb, Illinois. Mr. Beaupre had operated a hotel in De Kalb for the previous eight years and was the son of Mathias Beaupre who had managed the National Hotel in Oswego.148 This arrangement was short lived and the Becks resumed management of the hotel in September of 1873.149 At that time they made a number of improvements. The dining room was enlarged, the bedrooms were refurbished and the premises generally renovated. The hotel's barn was enlarged to provide room for guest's horses.150

Advertisement for Beck Hotel. "Beck's Hotel south of courthouse, Yorkville, IL. Good accommodations for travelers and for farmers. Sets a good table, and furnishes good stable for horses. Terms moderate. George Beck, proprietor."151

In June 1883, George Beck died after a long illness152 In October 1883, his wife, Albertina (Horst) Beck, married F. W. "Jacob" Helmuth, and Albertina and Jacob continued to operate Beck's Hotel.153

In November 1884, Beck's hotel was offered for sale or rent.154In December, the hotel was leased to Jacob's brother-in-law, Justus Nading who had married Jacob's sister Maria Helmuth. Justus was a baker and had operated a bakery and small hotel in downtown Yorkville.155,156

The following advertisement for the Nading House appeared in the local newspaper. "Nading House, formerly Beck's Hotel, opposite the courthouse, Yorkville, IL. Good accommodations for travelers. Good stables for teams. Free bus to and from all trains. Passengers carried from trains to all parts of the village. Justus Nading, proprietor."157

In the spring of 1885, Justus and Maria purchased the real estate where the bakery and their first hotel had been located, and moved back downtown.

When Yorkville was established, the top of the hill was a good location for a hotel. When the railroad was constructed, the tracks were laid at the base of the hill on the south side of the river. As a result, Yorkville's business district moved to the bottom of the hill and clustered near the depot and tracks.

By 1889, Beck's Hotel was in an out of the way location, and unable to compete with the hotels downtown. In an attempt to resuscitate Beck's Hotel, the Helmuths moved the hotel and out buildings down the hill to the north side of Hydraulic Avenue between Bridge Street and the depot. The hotel was placed on a new foundation and renamed City Hotel.158

 

The following transactions were found pertaining to Lot 8, Block 14, Original Village of Yorkville.

 

Lot 8: Solomon Heustis to Alvah Beecher, lot 8, block 14, Original Village of Yorkville, May 1, 1862, $75.

Lot 8: Alvah Beecher to Frederick W. Neidert, lot 8, block 14, Original Village of Yorkville, March 27, 1863, $450.

Lot 8: Frederick W. Neidert & wife to Christopher Moeller, part lot 8, block 14, September 15, 1864, $1,200.

Lot 8: Christopher Moeller to George Beck, lot 8, block 14, November 12, 1866, $1,800.

Lot 8: Christopher Moeller to George Beck, lot 8, block 14, January 7, 1867, $1,800. (Second filing.)

Lot 8: George Beck & wife to Ernst Ahrens, lot 8, block 14, August 20, 1870 (with exceptions, $4,800.

Lot 8: Francis A. Heustis to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 5 and 8, block 14, (no date but circa 1871) $100.

Lot 8: John B. Heustis to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 5 and 8, block 14, May 18, 1871, $120.

Lot 8: Ernst Ahrens & wife to George Beck lots 5 and 8, block 14, September 6, 1873, $1,100.

Lot 8: Henry Dunbar to Albertina Beck, lot 7 and part of lot 8, block 14, January 5, 1877, $275.

Lot 7: Albertina Helmuth (Mrs. Beck) & husband to Justus Nading, lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, block 14, November 29, 1884, $3,000.

Lot 8: Justus Nading & wife to Albertina Helmuth, lots 5, 6 7 and 8, block 14, February 16, 1887, $3,250.

Lot 8: Albertina Helmuth & husband to John E. Dwyer, lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, block 14, November 15, 1889, $550.

Lot 8: John E. Dwyer to Frederick Hage, lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, block 14, July 1891, $1,900.

Lot 8: Heirs of Henry Dunbar to Eliza Ann Dunbar, lot 5, block 11, and part of lot 8, block 14, Original Village of Yorkville, September 1892.

Lot 8: Administrator of Frederick Hage estate to John Wesche, lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, block 14, Original Village of Yorkville, March 1920, $3,500.

Lot 8: Date unknown, John & Nellie Wesche to LaRue Breese.

Lot 8: LaRue & Della Breese to Kendall County, Aug 31, 1968.159,160

 

 

In 1860, Alvah M. Beecher and W. J. Smith were managing one of Solomon Heustis' hotels perhaps the hotel on the southeast corner of Fox and Main Streets. As noted above, Alvah purchased Solomon's hotel on the northeast corner of Fox and Main Streets, May 1, 1862.

 

1860 census of Kendall Township, page 1, enumeration date August 6, family # 5.

Smith, W. J.               32 M IN self Hotel keeper

Smith, Sophia              28 F IN wife

Smith, Chester             12 M IN

Smith, Georgeanne           5 F IL

Smith, Sarah                3 F IL

Heustis, Solomon, Sr.      56 M NY

Heustis, James C.          22 M IL

Heustis, Solomon, Jr.      17 M IL

Misner, Harrison           47 M OH Pauper

Misner, Rebecca            42 F OH

Misner, Thomas             22 M OH Farm hand

Beecher, Alvah M.          28 M NY Hotel keeper

Beecher, Desire (Chappell) 19 M NY

Seyman, H.                 60 M NY Farm hand

 

1880 census of Kendall Township (Yorkville), page 114 & 338B, enumeration date June 15, family # 201.

Beck, George            49 M self Ger Ger Ger hotelkeeper

Beck, Albertina (Horst) 33 F wife Ger Ger Ger

Beck, Cora               9 F dau IL Ger Ger

Beck, Ada                5 F dau IL Ger Ger

Beck, George             2 M son IL Ger Ger

Wollenweber, Charles    34 M Ger Ger Ger servant

Popenburgh, Dora        18 F Ger Ger Ger servant

Haigh, E.               35 M NY NY NY boarder

City Hotel

 

In 1889, Jacob Helmuth purchased lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. The property was on the north side of East Hydraulic Avenue and previously housed the Church road cart factory property. Mr. Helmuth built new foundations and moved the Beck Hotel buildings to the site. At the same time the building formerly owned by Dr. Harris was moved from the block west of the courthouse, and attached to the hotel. The buildings were remodeled to serve as a hotel and bar.161 Part of the Church road cart factory was utilized as a stable.

Kendall County's premier building mover, George H. Nichols, was hired to move the buildings. Progress reports appeared in the Kendall County Record. "The Beck Hotel building is at the Methodist Church corner."162George Nichols got the old Beck Hotel building down the hill in good shape. The building crossed the railroad track at noon yesterday, only delaying an extra freight train about an hour. The building is now opposite its new foundation on the Church road cart premises.163 The old Beck Hotel buildings are now on the new foundations down by the paper mills. The new establishment is to be called the City Hotel.164

In December 1889, the City Hotel opened for business. It was convenient to the depot, and only a few minutes walk from the post office and courthouse.165

Advertisement for the City Hotel: Ready for Business! City Hotel, (near the depot) Yorkville, Illinois. J. Helmuth, Proprietor. Board by the day or week. Good accommodations for travelers. Meals at any hour of the day.166

When Mrs. George Beck (Later Albertina Helmuth) was landlady of Beck's Hotel many of the people from the southern part of Kendall County stayed there while attending court or on other business. They continued to stay with her in the City Hotel because of the good meals she had served in the hotel on the hill.

In May 1890, Jacob Helmuth was charged with selling liquor to men named Bell, Wilcox, and Griffith. They purchased two kegs of beer, went out into the river in a boat, got drunk, fell out, and drowned. Mrs. Sarah Bell and her five children were left destitute. She brought suit against the Helmuths for $20,000 damages under the Dram-shop Act.

After considerable legal maneuvering, the Helmuths lost their case to Mrs. Bell for the drowning of her husband in Fox River while intoxicated. In 1891 a verdict was rendered for $5,000 damages to the plaintiff. The Helmuths were financially ruined and lost the City Hotel. In addition to their personal financial ruin, the two men who had provided their bond, Henry C. Schumaker and William "Perry" Ferguson (sometimes Fargusson) were also hit hard. Schumaker had used his Fox Township farm as security and consequently lost the farm.167,168,169

After exhausting all legal remedies, Mr. Helmuth advertised the hotel for sale "due to ill health" and sought other employment. Jacob supposedly tried to make an exchange with George Cassens for a saloon on Third Street in Sterling, IL, but the exchange was not completed.170 After his failure to obtain the saloon in Sterling, it was announced that the Helmuths would remain at the City Hotel. In addition to an existing mortgage, the hotel premises were further encumbered by Mrs. Bell's claim. An attempt was made to restructure the mortgage and bonds, and arrange financial matters so the Helmuths could continue in business. Peter Riecherts supposedly agreed to assume financial responsibility for the City Hotel. Helmuth's bondsmen, Henry Schumaker and William "Perry" Ferguson were called upon to pay Mrs. Bell's claim.171

The financial problems could not be overcome and the Helmuths were out. In June 1892, Mr. Kissel was managing the City Hotel. A stable and hack (bus) were operated in conjunction with the hotel. Hotel guests could keep and care for their horses in the large barn at the rear of the hotel.172

In July 1892, Jacob Helmuth and his family left Yorkville for Chicago where Jake operated a saloon on West 21st Street.173

At this time, Allie Moore rented the City Hotel and became the landlord.174 The following advertisement appeared in the local newspaper. City Hotel (Near the depot) Yorkville, Illinois. A. H. Moore, Proprietor. Board by the day or week. Good accommodations for travelers. Meals at any hour of the day.175

The City Hotel was bought by the Nels Cassem Estate and from time to time was opened and closed. In March 1898, Fred Ohse assumed the management of the hotel. The hotel was painted and papered throughout, new fixtures and furniture purchased, and the office remodeled. The Yorkville electric lighting plant was in operation, and lights were installed throughout the building. Mr. Ohse promised his clientele that by next winter the rooms would be heated by steam. The old barroom east of the office was repainted and papered and offered for dances and large parties.176,177

At some point, the hotel closed again. In June 1901, there was a notice that the City Hotel had reopened and was re-furnished throughout. Room rates were $1.00 per day, "good meals" cost 25 cents. The rate to board there was $3.50 per week. Mrs. E. N. Speer proprietor.178

The hotel eventually closed for good, and the location was used as a bowling alley, garage, and various other minor businesses.

In 1911, the Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association bought the City Hotel buildings and property from the heirs of the Cassem Estate. The purpose of the Association was to promote the addition of business to the village. They successfully convinced the Rehbehn Brothers to utilize part of the ground floor for their button factory.179

In October 1914, the old City Hotel building in Yorkville was destroyed by fire. The origin of the blaze was unknown although the fire was first discovered near the chimney at the east end of the building. An electrical short in the attic was considered a possible cause. There was very little insurance coverage. Hard work on the part of the local firemen saved the adjoining barn used by veterinarian, Dr. R. F. Hoadley as a horse hospital. The Thomas Biggar furniture store was also threatened but did not ignite.

At the time of the fire, the Rehbehn Brothers button factory utilized most of the building. Nearly all their machinery, valued at about $1,000, was lost. Several bags of button blanks, worth some $1,600 were saved.

Dr. Hoadley who occupied the barn next door saved all of his property. Seven horses in the barn were safely remove as well as his instruments and medicine. The Frank Rudakis, George Hanson and Fred Jones families lived on the second floor of the building. They lost practically all of their household goods.

When the alarm was given, assistance arrived in a short time and every effort was made to keep the fire under control. The absence of wind made it easier to prevent the spread of the flames, and the firefighters were able to save a barn that was part of the former Church Road Cart factory, and only three feet from the burning building.

The frame construction of the old hotel building made it a veritable firetrap, and the interior burned like tinder. Yorkville's newly installed water service was a godsend in fighting the fire and keeping the flames under control. The Electric pump at the reservoir was able to keep two streams of water running constantly while maintaining the water pressure, and the volume of available water kept the sparks to a minimum.

At the time of the fire, the Yorkville Industrial and Improvement Association owned the building, which was insured for about $800. The button factory had been shut down for about a year and the place had been vacant most of the time. However, the Rehbehn Brothers were getting ready to start cutting shells again. Thirty-four machines had been installed and were waiting for a new motor when they were destroyed. There was a small amount of insurance on the machinery but not enough to cover the loss. 180

 

The following transactions were found pertaining to Lot 2, Block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Thomas T. Britton, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 30, 1864, $100.

Lot 2: Thomas T. Britton to Lee & Easley, (Henry R. Lee) lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 2, 1866, $125.

Lot 2: Henry R. Lee, et al, to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 6, 1866, $150.

Lot 2: Daniel G. Johnson & wife to Andrew P. Dixon, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 22, 1867, $250.

Lot 2: Andrew P. Dixon to John E. & Charles F. Crum, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 3, 1868, $1,800.

Lot 2: John M. Matlock & wife to Heman J. Winchell, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 27, 1870, $1,000.

Lot 2: John E. Crum & wife to Heman T. Winchell, undivided half of lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1871, $1,000.

Lot 2: Heman T. Winchell & wife to Isaac Crooker & Franklin M. Hobbs, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 9, 1872, $1,100.

Lot 2: Isaac Crooker & Franklin M. Hobbs, to Carlos Stevens, undivided 2/5th of lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 23, 1872, $800.

Lot 2: Franklin M. Hobbs to Isaac Crooker, undivided half interest in undivided 3/5th of lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 14, 1873, $750.

Lot 2: Isaac Crooker, et al, to Roana Foster, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 10, 1876, $1,200.

Lot 2: Carlos Stevens, et al, to Roana Foster, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 10, 1876, $1,200.

Lot 2: Roana Foster to Ann Church, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 17, 1887.

Lot 2: Ann Church to Roana Carter, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1889, $1,200.

Lot 2: Roana Carter & husband to Albertina Helmuth, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 24, 1889, $825. (City Hotel property.)

Lot 3: Master in Chancery to Nels O. Cassem, Certificate of purchase, City Hotel property, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1894, $2,586.

Lot 3: Olive J. Osmondson, et al, to Randall Cassem, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1906.

Lot 2: Maggie A. Cassem to William T. Boston, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1911, $800.

Lot 2: William T. Boston to Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association, lot 2 and part of lot 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1911, $800.

Lot 2: Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association to George M. Johnson, lot 2 and part of lot 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1916, $450.

Lot 2: George M. Johnson to the Rasmussen Motor Company, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1919, $10,000.

 

Fox River House

 

The Fox River House was built by John L. Lyon and was one of the first buildings constructed in what became downtown Yorkville. The hotel was located on the southeast corner of Bridge Street and Hydraulic Avenue just south of the railroad tracks, approximately one block west of the depot. The hotel had eight sleeping rooms upstairs; an office, saloon, and dining facilities downstairs. In its heyday, the Fox River House was the leading hotel in Yorkville.

When John Lyon's wife died, he sold the hotel to a W. S. McFeaters of Pennsylvania.181

In August 1865, the name of the Fox River House was changed to the Waverly House. The new landlord added a hall and dining room to the facility to entertain and serve the public.182

In September 1865, the Waverly House was sold to Andrew P. Dixon who placed Henry Matlock in charge.

In March 1866, Andrew P. Dixon sold the hotel back to Mr. Lyon who resumed the management of the hotel, and its name reverted to Fox River House. John repainted and thoroughly renovated the hotel promising to spare no effort to make it the best hotel in the county.183

In March 1870, John Lyon sold the hotel to Silas G. Dyer.184 The Fox River House, with Silas G. Dyer proprietor, was described as the leading hotel in Yorkville, with a first rate village tavern.185

January 1, 1871, Dennis P. Bence, father-in-law of Heman Winchell, became the landlord of the Fox River House.186

January 1, 1873, the Fox River house was leased to Ben Harris and Mr. Powars.187 The new proprietors renovated the hotel and put everything in good order. They promised patrons a "good square meal" and a comfortable stay.188,189

Over the years the Fox River House experienced frequent physical changes as well as changes in management. In 1874 the dining room was moved to the front of the hotel where the billiard room had been. The old dining room was converted into a billiard parlor and saloon.190

In September 1875, Silas G. Dyer sold the Fox River House to David Sinclair. David made a number of improvements in and around the hotel. He moved the livery barn to the back of the lot, and placed it on a new foundation. He constructed a large buggy shed where the livery barn had been for his patron's use.191

In 1880, Samuel Whitney was the proprietor of the Fox River House.192

In January 1881, David Sinclair rented his farm south of Yorkville and took over the management of the Fox River House.193 Advertisement for the Fox River House. "The proprietor, David Sinclair, would inform his friends in the county and elsewhere that he has opened his hotel at Yorkville, and hopes by attention and care to secure a share of the patronage of the traveling public. Anyone wishing a good meal, comfortable bed, and proper care of their teams, etc., will find it to their interest to call and try me. David Sinclair."194 By August 1881, Mr. Sinclair had given up the direct management of the Fox River House but still owned the property.195

By November 1881, Jacob Passage was the proprietor of the Fox River House.196

In October 1882, Nye LaSuer became the proprietor of the Fox River House. When Mr. LaSuer became the landlord, the Fox River House was again renovated.197

In 1883, Nye LaSuer was replaced by Peter Weiland of Naperville.198

In May 1884, Mr. Weiland advertised that the Fox River House at Yorkville had been refitted and put in excellent shape for the accommodation of the public. He stated commercial travelers would find a good room to show their samples, that there were good stables on the premises, and the charges were moderate.199

In September 1884, Peter Weiland purchased the Fox River House from David Sinclair for $2500. After purchasing the hotel, he added an addition on the rear of the building.200

In April 1889, after owning and operating the hotel for six years, Peter Weiland exchanged the Fox River House for property in Effingham, Illinois, and was succeeded by Fritz Garmes.201

This arrangement only lasted for a short time, and Mr. and Mrs. Bonckhe replace Mr. Garmes. The Bonckhes built a sidewalk between the depot and the Fox River House making it easier for railroad passengers to reach the hotel.202

By May 1890, the Fox River House was again for sale or rent. It was advertised as an old established hotel that could be profitable

By June 1891, Frank Fasmer of Aurora was the proprietor of the Fox River House.203 By October 1891, The Fasmer family had ceased managing the hotel and left Yorkville. However, the saloon in the hotel was still running. 204

One of the factors leading to the departure of the Fasmers was the death of Thomas Walker. Mr. Walker was alleged to have been a heavy drinker and was found dead in the yard of his Yorkville home. Mrs. Walker and her daughter, Florence McElwane, blamed the Fasmers for Thomas' death, and filed a suit in the Kendall County Circuit Court against Frank Fasmer for $10,000 damages, for selling liquor to their husband and father. 205

 

At the time of the 1860 census the following people occupied the Fox River House.

 

1860 census of Kendall Township, page 4, enumeration date August 6, family # 25.

Lyons, John Libheart   41 M PA self hotelkeeper

Lyons, Julia M. (Hale) 28 F NY wife

Lyons, Amanda          12 F PA dau

Hanson, Olin           32 M Norway mason

Peterson, Ole          30 M Sweden papermaker

Harris, Blexton        33 M OH physician

Hobbs, Albert M.       24 M MA merchant

Blackman, Owen         30 M Ireland blacksmith

McWall, John           25 M PA miller

Ketchum, Gilbert W.    32 M NY agent

 

1880 census of Kendall Township (Yorkville), page 119 & 341A, enumeration date June 17, family # 266.

Whitney, Samuel E. 50 M self OH MA CT hotelkeeper

Whitney, Julia A. 39 F wife OH OH OH

Whitney, Luella 7 F dau MI OH OH

 

The building that housed the Fox River House was eventually sold to the Kendall County Farm Bureau who used the building as their headquarters and offices until they built a new office on Van Emmon Street. When the Farm Bureau offices were moved, the building was sold and used for several businesses including an appliance store, electrical supply store, and paint store. The old wood frame building was eventually removed and replaced by new brick building constructed for the George M. Dickson insurance and real estate offices. Later an antique and gift store occupied the building.

 

The following transactions were found pertaining to Lot 1, Block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot 1: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to John L. Lyon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 14, 1863, $500.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon & wife to Alphonse Covel, north half lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 11, 1864, $80.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon to W. S. McFeaters, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 26, 1864, $3,500.

Lot 1: W. S. McFeaters & wife to Andrew P. Dixon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 16, 1865, $2,000.

Lot 1: Andrew P. Dixon to John L. Lyon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 15, 1866, $1,500.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon to John McOmber, (part?) lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 30, 1867, $175.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon & wife to Isaac Crooker & Franklin M. Hobbs, part lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 30, 1867, $75.

Lot 1: Isaac Crooker & wife to James A. Godard, part lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 25, 1868, $75.

Lot 1: James A. Godard to Chancy Y. Godard, lot 2, and part of lots 1 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 6, 1877, $4,000.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon & wife to Silas G. Dyer, lot 1, and lot 6 (except 37 feet), block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 9, 1870, $5,000.

Lot 1: Heirs of Charles Merrick to Frederick Hage, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 2, 1874, $2,648.75.

Lot 1: Wellington Mason to Orville E. Judson, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 18, 1875, $500.

Lot 1: Silas G. Dyer & wife to David Sinclair, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 30, 1875, $6,000.

Lot 1: David Sinclair to Peter Weiland, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 26, 1884, $2,500.

Lot 1: Peter Weiland to Lizzie Flechmann, lots 1 and 6, block 6 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 20, 1889 $9,000.

Lot 1:

Lot 1: Wellington Mason & wife to Lew “Wallace” Mason, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 9, 1892, $1,500.

Lot 1: Lew “Wallace” Mason to George W. McHugh, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1898, $1,500.

Lot 1: Chancy Y. Godard to James A. Godard, part of lots 1, 2 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1898, $3,000.

Lot 1: Lew “Wallace” Mason to John J. Gates, part of lots 1 and 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1914.

Heustis Hotel, a. k. a. Dunbar House

 

The original town of Yorkville was on top of the hill and clustered in the area around the courthouse. In the early days, many visitors came to Yorkville to attend court or transact other county business. Judges, attorneys, and witnesses often needed a place to stay at the county seat.

In about 1843-4, Solomon Heustis, Sr. built the first hotel in Yorkville. The hotel accommodated many of those attending court as well as other visitors. As indicated in the previous discussion of Beck's hotel there were two hotels at the intersection of Fox and Main Streets. The hotel on the northeast corner was on Lot 8, Block 14, and faced Fox Street. The hotel on the southeast corner was on Lot 2, Block 11, and faced Main Street. Solomon Heustis probably built and operated both of these hotels. It is definitely known that he built and operated the hotel on Lot 2, Block 11. Solomon managed this hotel until he sold the property to Henry Dunbar in November 1864.

Solomon's original hotel building probably ceased being a hotel sometime in the 1870s or 1880s. The building still exists and is used as a private residence.

 

The following transactions were found pertaining to Lot 2, Block 11, Original Village of Yorkville.

        1842, Franklin Winchell to Almon Ives

Jun  2, 1843, Edward W. Brewster to Almon Ives

        1843, Almon Ives & Nancy Ives to Solomon Heustis, Sr.

Nov 22, 1864, Solomon Heustis, Sr. to Henry Dunbar (Hotel was then called "Dunbar House")

Dec 28, 1892, Eliza Ann Dunbar to Lars Larson

Oct 30, 1935, Silas Larson to Joseph Riemenschneider

Oct 31, 1936, Caroline Riemenschneider to Herundo Salisbury

Apr  5, 1975, Herundo Salisbury to Eugene Salisbury & Bernice Salisbury,206

Holland Hotel

 

The Holland Hotel was located on the northwest corner of Bridge and Van Emmon Streets, the current site of Bridgeberry Twigs. Owner Henry A. (H. A.) Holland owned a restaurant and grocery store in the hotel building.207 The following announcement was published in March 1870. "Henry A. (H. A.) Holland begs to inform his friends and the public generally that he has removed his business up street to Mrs. Hartwell's old stand where he intends to keep hotel, restaurant and a fancy grocery store. He will supply warm meals three times daily, also good accommodations for the traveling public. He will also keep the following articles in their season. All kinds of green fruits and vegetables, foreign nuts and imported fruits, oranges, lemons, etc. will be stocked. A good stock of fancy and staple groceries will also be carried, as well as Yankee notions of all kinds. Ice cream, lemonade, soda water, and all kinds of summer drinks will be dispensed from the soda fountain. Domestic wine will be available for medicinal use. The celebrated IXL Family bitters, the best in use, will be available for only 75 cents per bottle. These are warranted pure medical bitters, containing no drugs, no poor whiskey. (Note he did not say they contained no whiskey.) He will also keep the best stock of confectionery in the county. Hatterys' Aurora Bread, cakes, pies; etc. will be available three times a week. Luncheons will be served at all times of the day. Terms strictly cash." 208

H. A. Holland moved from Yorkville to Des Moines, IA, and others followed in his footsteps. At one time Fred Martin was the proprietor. In 1917, S. J. Wittrup bought the hotel and restaurant from Mr. Martin. Mr. Wittrup ran the establishment for seven years before passing away after a long illness. 209 Other landlords ran the hotel and restaurant until Mr. and Mrs. Allen became the proprietors in about 1937. The Allens renamed the place Allen Hotel, and were the final operators of a hotel on that site.

 

For transactions pertaining to lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, see Allen Hotel.

Nading House

 

In December 1884, Beck's Hotel, was leased to Justus Nading. Justus was a baker and operated a bakery in downtown Yorkville.210

The following advertisement for the Nading House (formerly Beck's Hotel) appeared in the local newspaper. Nading House, formerly Beck's Hotel, opposite the courthouse, Yorkville, IL. Good accommodations for travelers. Good stables for teams. Free bus to and from all trains. Passengers carried from trains to all parts of the village. Justus Nading, proprietor.211

Nading Hotel, a. k. a. Hotel Nading and Yorkville Hotel

 

The Nading Hotel was located on lot 1, and the south half of lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Justus Nading came to America from Germany in June 1883.The day after he arrived in New York City he traveled directly to Yorkville. In March 1884, he bought a bakery and hotel owned by Ira Lozier on the west side of Bridge Street between Hydraulic Avenue and the river. The building was a small frame structure with a few sleeping rooms, a dining room and kitchen. Three weeks after Mr. Nading entered the hotel business, small pox broke out in Yorkville. The outbreak occurred in Fred Johnson's saloon next door to the bakery and hotel and no one wanted to come near that part of town. Justus thought it was all over for him but fortunately was able to hold on until the December 1884 when he assumed management of Beck's Hotel. In the spring of 1885, Mr. and Mrs. Nading purchased the real estate where the bakery and their first hotel was located, and moved back downtown.

From the start, Justus was popular with his customers. He was polite and obliging, and the business began to grow. Shortly after purchasing the property, the Nadings expanded their business by adding a restaurant. Justus became aware that there was a demand by traveling men and others, for better hotel accommodations in Yorkville. To meet this need, the Nadings built a small brick addition on the rear of their establishment. The first floor of the new building was used to expand the restaurant and bakery. The second floor contained four hotel rooms. For a short time, this was enough to meet the demand. When their patronage increased, they purchased the lot north of their original building and built a two-story brick building there in 1890.The first floor was used for a storeroom and the second floor as a hotel. They installed all the modern conveniences, steam heat, hot and cold water, etc. 212 The bedrooms were comfortable and well furnished. Justus and his wife served good meals and provided comfortable lodging. When court was in session, many members of the legal fraternity stayed there.

In November 1892, Justus Nading advertised his hotel in the local newspaper. Hotel Nading. North side of railroad. Bridge Street, Yorkville, IL. Good accommodations for travelers. Restaurant and bakery. Oysters by the can, in bulk, or served in the restaurant. First-class bakery furnishing bread, cakes, pies, etc. Fresh fruit and vegetables in season. Travelers will find good rooms and beds, good meals and prompt attention. Meals served at any hour.213

About 1897 the Nadings sold their bakery to concentrate on their hotel business.

By this time, their hotel business had grown to the point they did not have enough room to accommodate the demand. In 1898, the original wooden structure was torn down and replaced with a three-story brick building. The third story extended over the top of the earlier two story brick building used as a hotel. The building was three stories high, 24 feet wide and 100 feet long. The dining room and office were on the first floor. The second and third floors were divided into thirty sleeping rooms. A large area on the second floor in the front of the building contained a parlor for the guests.214

Initially the hotel enjoyed a good business from people coming from the southern part of the county who found it necessary to stay over night in Yorkville on court or other business. When jury trials lasted beyond a day it was not feasible for them to commute between their homes and Yorkville. This changed with the advent and increased use of automobiles. The automobile made it possible to commute between the far corners of the county and Yorkville.

By 1905, The Nading family had been in the hotel business for over twenty years. Mrs. Nading had been an active participant, and had been responsible for all the food preparation for the period and was ready for a rest. Justus' interests were also changing. He was instrumental in bringing the Chicago Telephone Company to Yorkville. The company's central office was in the hotel and Justus was the local manager. By 1905, the hotel business was waning and the telephone company's prospects were rising, so the Nadings decided to leave the hotel business.

A deal was completed, and the hotel business was leased to C. B. Dursey215 of Hinsdale for one year. Justus retained his position as local manager of the Chicago Telephone Company and the offices remained in the hotel building. Possession was given October 1, 1905, and the Nading family moved out of the hotel into a home purchased from the Jacob P. Black, Estate. Mr. and Mrs. Dursey ran the hotel until their lease expired September 30, 1906. Shortly after their lease expired, they moved to Toluca, IL where they had purchased a hotel.216 Mr. and Mrs. Naden resumed the management of their hotel, which was closed long enough to completely refurbish and redecorate before reopening.217

In 1911, Yorkville had two saloons. The Nadings wanted to lease the hotel but needed to make the business more attractive. Justus convinced the Yorkville Board of Trustees to grant him a saloon license. The basement of the hotel had been remodeled, and the saloon was to be in the basement. This meant the new saloon would be next door to Fred Johnson's saloon. Many Yorkville residents disagreed with the Board's action and felt they had been duped because Justus was a member of the Board of Trustees that granted the saloon license.

At this time, the hotel and saloon was rented to Fred Hohoff and his partner Nick Kramer. In February 1914 the partnership was dissolved and Nick Kramer and his wife returned to Muskegon, MI. Hohoff continued to manage the hotel until the spring of 1915, when it came back into the Nadings hands. At this time the hotel was under the direct management of Mr. Nading but he hired Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Behlke of McHenry to manage the hotel and food service.218 219

Less than a year later the Behlke family left the hotel and moved to Rockford, IL. The Nadings returned to the full management of the hotel. Mrs. William Bretthauer was hired to assist in the restaurant.220

In 1919, Justus retired from the management of the Hotel Nading and Mr. and Mrs. George W. Snyder of Racine, Wisconsin replaced him. The Snyders had been in the hotel business for a number of years. George had been with a Springfield, Illinois hotel for twelve years and recently associated with the Racine (Wisconsin) Elks Club.221

By 1925, Charles B. Krohn was renting the Nading Hotel. Justus had found a buyer for the hotel but the deal was mutually called off. Justus had made up his mind that the prospective purchasers were not the kind of people that would fit into the Yorkville community.222

In April 1926, Charles B. Krohn sold his interest in the Hotel Nading to Frank Mikula of Berwyn. Mr. Krohn was undecided what he was going to do, but his wife who was reputed to be an excellent cook, remained as head of the kitchen.223

Apparently the hotel was actually operated by Mrs. Mikula rather than her husband. Frank ran some "club rooms" in the basement of the hotel where local men would come to play billiards or what ever. A fight occurred in the clubrooms and the sheriff was called to investigate. An investigation of the cause of the fight led to the discovery that home brew was being manufactured in the hotel.224 When Sheriff Barkley, and his deputy, Frank R. Skinner, searched the basement rooms they found a large number of bottles of beer and everything necessary to manufacture the beverage. In September 1926, Frank Mikula was arrested and sentenced to 90 days in the county jail for manufacturing and selling home brew.

In 1933, the Hotel Nading stood vacant for several months. The hotel was newly decorated and in September 1933 reopened to the public. Mr. and Mrs. Leech and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer of Elgin assumed the management of the hotel.

In May 1936, the management of the Hotel Nading and Cafe changed again. On May 20th Mr. L. A. "Lefty" Peterson, a native of Newark became the manager. He had been the chief clerk at the Hotel Aurora for several years before taking over the Hotel Nading. Miss Pearl Brown, an experience restaurant cook, managed the hotel kitchen.

In April 1938, Mrs. Minor assumed management of the Hotel Nading restaurant. She had operated a restaurant in Sandwich for the previous fifteen years.225

Yorkville Hotel, a. k. a. Nading Hotel, and Hotel Nading

 

Frank Pennuto operated Frank's Tavern next door to the Hotel Nading. On May 23,1939, Frank assumed the management of the Hotel Nading as well, and renamed it the Yorkville Hotel and Restaurant.226

The Hotel Nading, a. k. a. Yorkville Hotel, still stands today (2003) on the west side of Bridge Street between Hydraulic Avenue and the river but is no longer used as a hotel.

Index

Ahrens, Ernst 25, 26

Aldrich, Mrs. 11

Allen, Mr. and Mrs. 33

Ashley, Emerson 19

Atkins, Ann Eliza 20

Austin, Eleazer H. 5, 6

Austin, Joshua N. 11

Austin, Nathaniel Y. 5, 6

Austin, Sarah Jane 5, 6

Ball, John 20

Barber, Catherine 22

Barber, John C. 20, 21, 22

Barber, John Calvin 22

Barber, Julia Ann 21

Barber, Sheldon 17

Barkley, Sheriff 35

Barney, James 18

Bartlett, Electa J. 11, 13

Bartlett, John 19

Bartlett, S. J. 11, 21

Bartlett, Samuel J. 11, 13

Bartram, Elise 7

Bartram, Jared 7

Bass, Anna 20

Bass, George 20

Bass, H. 20

Bass, Robinson 20

Beach, Mr. 13

Beaupre, Arthur 18

Beaupre, C. E. 26

Beaupre, Charles 14

Beaupre, Charles E. 18

Beaupre, Eben 18

Beaupre, Mathias 14, 16, 17, 18, 26

Beaupre, Sarah 14, 18

Beaupre, William 14, 18

Beck, Ada 27

Beck, Albertina 26

Beck, Albertina (Horst) 25, 26, 27

Beck, Cora 27

Beck, Edwin J. 21

Beck, George 25, 26, 27, 28

Beecher, Alvah 25, 26

Beecher, Alvah M. 27

Beecher, Desire (Chappell) 27

Beecher, Harvey 4, 5, 6

Beecher, Raphael 4

Behlke, Albert C. 34

Behlke, Family 34

Bell, Mrs. 28

Bell, Sarah 28

Bence, Dennis P. 30

Benthien, Elizabeth 10

Benthien, Harry 10

Benthien, John 10

Biggar, Thomas 28

Birney, Christina (Jeffrey) 8

Black, Elias A. 25, 29, 31

Black, Jacob P. 25, 29, 31, 34

Blackman, Owen 31

Blackmer, Luke 10

Blake, Joseph 24

Bonckhe, Mr. and Mrs. 31

Bond, Henry 20

Booth, Edward H. 7

Booth, Lucy (McLay) 7

Boss, James 17

Boston, William T. 30

Boyd, Abe 12

Bradley, Erasmus D. 17

Bradley, William 21

Breese, Della 27

Breese, LaRue 27

Bretthauer, Mrs. William 34

Briggs, Cecelia 17

Briggs, William 17, 19

Bristol, Robert C. 23

Britton, Thomas T. 29

Brown, H. N. 15

Brown, Pearl 35

Buck, Ephraim 9

Budd, Jacob 10

Buland, Iver 14

Bull, John 16

Bullock, Mr. 21

Burdick, Hiram 18

Burkhart, Frederick 17

Burns, Laura 14

Burns, Louis R. 14

Burry, Dr. 8

Butler, Curtis M. 16, 17, 19

Butler, Harriet 17

Byerrum, Earl E. 6

Byerrum, Florence J. 6

Camp, Mary 4

Camp, Samuel C. 4

Carter, Roana 29

Cary, A. 22

Caskey, George B. 23

Caskey, Sarah L. 23

Cassem, Maggie A. 30

Cassem, Nels 28

Cassem, Nels O. 29

Cassem, Randall 30

Cassens, George 28

Caton, Judge 17

Cefus, Rosa 19

Chapman, J. C. 17

Chapman, James W. 17

Chappell, Henry 10

Church, Ann 29

Clellin, James 16

Cole, Jeremiah J. 17

Cole, Mary A. 17

Collins, Carrie 16

Collins, Henry J. 16

Convis, DeWitt 14

Cook, J. B. 16

Cooper, Ambrose 24

Cooper, Valentine 24

Costello, Martin 14

Covel, Alphonse 31

Cowen, Amelia 17

Coy, Irus 15

Crapley, James 14

Crooker, Isaac 29, 32

Crum, Charles F. 29

Crum, John E. 26, 29

Cunningham, J. 15

Danforth, Charles 18

Danforth, Martha 17

Danforth, William Jr. 17

Danforth, William T. 18

Davis, David E. 3

Denton, John M. 18

Dixon, A. P. 30

Dixon, Andrew P. 22, 29, 30, 31, 32

Dixon, James H. 21, 22

Dodge, Arnold 9

Dolder, Mr. & Mrs. 24

Dunbar, Eliza Ann 27, 32

Dunbar, Henry 26, 27, 32

Dursey, C. B. 34

Dwyer, John E. 26

Dyer, Silas 30

Dyer, Silas G. 30, 32

Eddy, Mrs. J. W. 12

Eielsen, Elling 8

Eldridge, John C. 22

Eldridge, Mary J. (Henning) 22

Elliott, Dr. 6

Ernst, George 5

Farley, Mr. 17

Fasmer, Frank 31

Fatsen, Christopher 18

Fatsen, John 18

Fatsen, Sophia 19

Faxon, L. 22

Faxon, Rodney D. 22

Felch, J. H. 4

Fenton, Marcus A. 18

Ferguson, A. J. 13

Ferguson, William 28

Ferriss, Charles 17

Ferriss, Richard R. 17

Fetter, William 22

Fiddler, M. 24

Fitch, Finley T. 6

Flanders, Charles 21

Flechmann, Lizzie 32

Foster, Roana 29

Gaisser, Otto 24

Garmes, Fritz 31

Gates, John J. 32

Gates, Wareham 9

Gilmore, Mrs. 10

Gilson, Alexander 14

Godard, Chancy Y. 32

Godard, James A. 32

Goodale, Abigail Catherine (Miller) 7

Goodale, Frederick Welch 7

Goodale, Hiram J. 7

Goodale, Lawson N. 7

Goodale, Lockwood W. 7

Goodale, Mary Elizabeth 7

Goodale, Sarah E. 7

Gordon, Margaret 7

Goss, Edna L. 24

Goss, George 22, 24

Goss, George B. 24

Goss, Lee Anderson 24

Goss, Lock A. 24

Goss, Mary E. (Lathrop) 24

Goss, Mary Lathrop 24

Gough, James B. 13

Gray, Horace 3, 42

Gray, Norman 3

Grimes, James S. 19

Gunsel, William H. 11

Hage, Frederick 26, 27, 32

Hahnenstein, Edward F. 25

Haigh, E. 27

Halbert, Addie 15

Halbert, Artemis S. 14

Halbert, Edith May 15

Halbert, Margaret E. (Brauman) 15

Halbert, Robert L. 15

Hall, Asher B. 18

Hanson, George 29

Hanson, Olin 31

Harp, Samuel 23

Harrington, Dar 12

Harrington, Lew 12

Harris, Ben 30

Harris, Blexton 31

Harris, Dr. 27

Hartwell, Mrs. 33

Hawley, Paul 15

Hayden, Jackson 20

Heavener, Albert 21

Helmuth, Albertina 26, 28, 29

Helmuth, F. W. 26

Helmuth, J. 28

Helmuth, Maria 26

Helmuth, Mr. 28

Hemm, Barbara 17

Henning, Charles 22

Henning, Edgar L. 23

Henning, Josephine 22

Herrick, Harriet 17

Herrick, Jane 17

Herrick, Oscar 17

Heustis, Francis A. 26

Heustis, James C. 27

Heustis, John B. 26

Heustis, Solomon 25, 26, 27, 32

Heustis, Solomon, Jr. 27

Heustis, Solomon, Sr. 27, 32

Hicks, E. W. 42

Hicks, James 18

Hills, Levi Sr. 7, 8

Hills, Sarah (Sears) 7

Hoadley, Dr. 29

Hoadley, Dr. R. F. 28

Hobbs, Albert M. 31

Hobbs, Franklin M. 29, 32

Hohoff, Fred 34

Holland, H. A. 33

Holland, Henry A. (H. A.) 33

Hollenback, David S. 4, 5, 6

Hollenback, George M. 25

Hollenback, Margaret A. (Johnson) 4

Hopkins, Robert 5, 6

Hopkins, Rufus 5, 6

Horton, A. 11

Huff, N. W. 13

Hull, Azariah Z. 16

Inscho, Moses 9

Ives, Almon 32

Ives, Nancy 32

Jackson, William 18

Jacobson, Henry L. 23

Jeffers, William R. 7

Jefferson, Mr. 8

Jeter, William H. 5

Johnson, B. H. 5

Johnson, Bradford 5

Johnson, Bradford H. 4, 5, 6

Johnson, Daniel G. 26, 29

Johnson, Fred 33, 34

Johnson, George B. 4

Johnson, George M. 30

Johnson, Harriet P. (Atwood) 4

Johnson, Margaret A. 4

Johnson, Mary Ann 4

Johnson, Milford 4

Johnson, Patrick 18

Jones, Fred 29

Judson, Orville E. 32

Justice, Arthur 13

Justice, Charles 13

Kauper, Jennie 5, 6

Kellam, E. M. 9

Kellogg, Abel H. 17

Kellogg, George 11

Kennedy, Herman N. 21

Kennedy, Joseph D. 18

Ketchum, Gilbert W. 31

Kilmore, C. M. 16

Kimball, Angeline 4

Kimball, W. 4

Kissel, Mr. 28

Knox, Lyman S. 7

Kramer, Nick 34

Krebs, Heronimus 13

Krohn, Charles B. 34, 35

Larson, Lars 32

Larson, Silas 32

LaSuer, Mr. 30

LaSuer, Nye 30

Lawrence, Martin 4

Lee, Henry R. 29

Leech, Mr. and Mrs. 35

Lehman, Josiah 20

Levy, Lewis 15

Lockwood, Charles H. 10

Lockwood, Dell 10

Long, R. 18

Loser, Peter 24

Lowe, William R. 21

Lozier, Ira 33

Lull, Frank 22

Lutyens, Clifford 16

Lutyens, Hannah (Smith) 16

Lutyens, Lillie Belle 16

Lutyens, Lyman 16

Lutyens, William 15

Lutyens, William F. 16

Lyon, John 30

Lyon, John L. 31, 32

Lyons, Amanda 31

Lyons, John 30

Lyons, John Libheart 31

Lyons, Julia M. (Hale) 31

Marshall, John R. 10, 11

Martin, Fred 33

Mary (Lathrop) Goss 22

Mason, Aaron 19

Mason, Lew \ 32

Mason, Robert E. 11

Mason, Wellington 32

Massey, Robert 18

Matlock, Henry 30

Matlock, John M. 29

Matteson, Joel A. 3

Matthews, Robert 9

May, Susan (Short) 4

McAtee, William 13

McClaskey, Alexander 7

McClellan, James 3, 5, 6

McClelland, Robert A. 25

McClue, G. W. 16

McElwane, Florence 31

McEmry, Mr. 24

McFeaters, W. S. 30, 31

McHugh, George W. 32

McLay, Alexander 6

McLay, Frank 6

McLay, Margaret 6

McOmber, John 32

McWall, John 31

Mead Brothers 23

Merrick, Charles 32

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. 35

Mikula, Frank 35

Mikula, Mrs. 35

Milks, Ann 3

Miller, Richard D. 18

Minor, Mrs. 35

Misner, Asbury 14

Misner, Harrison 27

Misner, Rebecca 27

Misner, Thomas 27

Moeller, Christopher 26

Monk, William 16

Moore, A. H. 28

Moore, Allie 28

Moore, Gracie L. 13

Moore, John 8

Moore, Kittie M. 13

Moore, Nathan S. 13

Moore, W. D. 13

Morgan, D. C. 16

Morgan, Juliet 16

Morrell, F. B. 14

Morrell, Melinda 14

Morrell, Raymond H. 14

Morrill, Mr. 10

Mr. Lyon 30

Mudgett, Edwin 20

Murphy, Alexander 18

Murphy, Anna A. 19

Murphy, Wright 16, 17

Naden, Isabella 9

Nading, Justus 26, 33, 34

Nading, Mr. 33, 34

Nading, Mr. and Mrs. 33

Nading, Mrs. 34

Neck, Jack 15

Neff, Mr. and Mrs. George 12

Neidert, Frederick W. 26

Nellis, John 20

Nelson, Mrs. 23

Nelson, Mrs. D. 23

Newton, William R. 25

Nichols, Daniel P. 16

Nichols, George 5, 27

Nichols, George H. 27

Ohse, Fred 28

Ohse, Mr. 28

Osmondson, Olive J. 30

Palmer, A. P. 12

Parke, A. C. 18

Passage, Anna (Davis) 24

Passage, Charles 24

Passage, Jacob 21, 24, 30

Passage, Jacob R. 24

Passage, James 24

Passage, Jane 24

Passage, Newton 24

Patrick, Eliza 3

Patrick, Jacob 3

Patrick, Jacob Sr. 3

Paul, Mr. 13

Pearce, Abel 20

Pederson, George M. 25

Penman, Perry W. 25

Pennuto, Frank 35

Perry, Susan 19

Perry, William 18

Peterson, L. A. 35

Peterson, Ole 31

Platt, Daniel 24, 25

Platt, Daniel Jesse 24

Platt, Esther (Ricketson) 24

Platt, Mr. 24

Platt, Mrs. 24

Popenburgh, Dora 27

Powars, Mr. 30

Pulfrey, Mr. 23

Quincey, Frank 5

Quinsey, Frank 5, 6

Quinsey, Nelson 5

Quinsey, Nelson J. 5, 6

Race, Eliza 17

Ralston, Joseph 20

Rank, Lorenzo 18

Rapelje, Austin W. 21

Rawson, F. E. 5, 6

Rawson, Harvey M. 5, 6

Reddock, John L. 6

Rehbehn, Brothers 28, 29

Remmers, William 25

Richards, Moses J. 17

Riecherts, Peter 28

Riemenschneider, Caroline 32

Riemenschneider, Joseph 32

Robbins, Edward J. 21

Robert Hopkins

Hopkins, Robert 5, 6

Roberts, Samuel 18, 19

Roberts, Sarah Jane was Sarah Jane (Austin) 5, 6

Robinson, Margaret 7

Rudakis, Frank 29

Salisbury, Bernice 32

Salisbury, Eugene 32

Salisbury, Herundo 32

Sanders, Samuel 18

Schiller, Margaret 18

Schumaker, Henry C. 28

Scott, Delphinia 20

Scott, James Jr. 19

Scott, Julia 19

Scott, Sarah 20

Seyman, H. 27

Shannon, Harry 24

Sherrill, Henry 8, 9, 42

Shibley, Charles 22

Short, John 3, 4, 5, 6

Short, John Sr. 4

Shults, Elizabeth (Vedder) 10

Shults, Josiah J. 10

Silas G. Dyer 30

Simpson, Fred W. 25

Sinclair, David 30, 31, 32

Sinclair, Mr. 30

Skinner, Catherine 9

Skinner, Charlotte 9

Skinner, Frank R. 35

Skinner, John 9

Smith, Chester 27

Smith, Dwight E. 19

Smith, Ezra 19

Smith, Georgeanne 27

Smith, Henry 22

Smith, John 9

Smith, Lizzie 23

Smith, Lyman 14

Smith, Mary 19

Smith, Sarah 27

Smith, Sophia 27

Smith, W. J. 27

Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. George W. 34

Speer, Mrs. E. N. 28

Stafford, Henry 18

Stevens, Carlos 29

Stevens, Henry Kase 3

Stevens, Mary A. 3

Steward, Julian 23

Steward, Lewis 22, 23

Stockton, Mary 17

Stoffregen, Henry 25

Stowell, Susan (Butler) 15

Stowell, Walter 15

Stymacks, Debra 10

Stymacks, Michael 10

Suydam, L. Guy 24

Taylor, Franklin 20

Taylor, Mary 20

Thomas, Abraham 5, 6

Thomas, Washington 25

Thorp, Eliza 4

Thorp, George W. 4

Thorp, Henry 4

Thorp, John 4

Thorp, Leonard 4

Thorp, Martha 4

Thorp, Mary 4

Thorp, Orson L. 4

Thorp, William M. 4

Thurber, Harry R. 5, 6

Thurber, Louise 5, 6

Tompkins, Samuel 17

Toombs, Alta 10

Toombs, William 10

Towle, Decoliar 19

Towle, Martha 17

Townsend, Charles D. 17

Turner, John 18

VanDorston, John P. 18

VanPelt, Ann 9

VanPelt, Cornelius 9

VanPelt, Jane (Vreeland) 9

VanPelt, John 9

VanPelt, Katie 9

VanPelt, Tunis 9

VanSickle, Henry 17

Walker, Mr. 31

Walker, Mrs. 31

Walker, Thomas 31

Ward, Lillian E. 20

Warner, Mr. 23

Watson, George W. 16

Weber, Mary 18

Weeks, Charles 10

Weiland, Mr. 30

Weiland, Peter 30, 31, 32

Wesche, John 27

Wesche, Nellie 27

Wheat, George M. 21

White, James 12

Whitman, Adelia 13

Whitney, Julia A. 31

Whitney, Luella 31

Whitney, Samuel 30

Whitney, Samuel E. 31

Wicks, James 18

Wilcox, Charles 16

Willett, Jane A. 22

William, Dolder 24

Wilsey, Archibald M., Jr. 14

Wilson, Charles 13

Wilson, Mary (Krebs) 13

Winchell, Franklin 32

Winchell, Heman 30

Winchell, Heman J. 29

Winchell, Heman T. 29

Wittrup, Mabel C. 25

Wittrup, S. J. 33

Wittrup, Sophus J. 25

Wolcott, Sarah Jane (Austin) 5, 6

Wollenweber, Charles 27

Wood, S. D. 14

Woodward, H. 22

Wormley, Ida (Passage) 24

Worsley, Abigail 14

Worsley, Mr. 13

Worsley, Timothy 13, 43

Wright, W. 10

Yandai, A. S. 15

Yard, Fanny 18

Yard, Grace 18

Yard, James 18

Yard, John P. 18

Yard, Juliet 18

Yard, Lavinia 18

Yard, Mary Ann 18

Young, Horace 6

 

1 Grantor Index. 40 acres; the west half of the southeast quarter and 40 acres; the east half of the southwest quarter of section twenty-seven.

2 History of Kendall County, Rev. E. W. Hicks, 1877, p. 207.

3 Joel Aldrich Matteson was an early resident and landowner of Seward Township. From 1853-1857, he was the tenth Governor of Illinois.

4 Grantor Index. The east half of the east 80 acres (40 acres) in the northeast quarter of section 33.

5 History of Kendall County, Rev. E. W. Hicks, 1877, pp. 207-8.

6 Since Horace Gray was appointed postmaster of the Au Sable post office May 28, 1842, Mr. Gray's given name may have been Horace rather than Norman.

7 Interview with Harvey L. Larson, April 16, 2000.

8 "Susan Short May: The story of her ancestry and of her early life in Illinois;" Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 119-128, April 1913.

9 Kendall County Record, June 16, 1864.

10 Kendall Clarion, May 12, 1860.

11 Kendall County Record, August 11, 1915.

12 Kendall County Record, October 15, 1874.

13 Kendall County Record, January 7, 1875.

14 Kendall County Record, September 22, 1915.

15 Kendall County Record, September 22, 1915.

16 Kendall County Record, November, 15, 1915.

17 Kendall County Record, August 11, 1915.

18 Kendall County Record, October 27, 1915.

19 Kendall County Record, September 22, 1915.

20 Kendall County Record, September 22, 1915.

21 Kendall County Record, November, 15, 1915.

22 Kendall County Record, August 22, 1881.

23 Kendall County Record, April 8, 1875.

24 Kendall County Record, February 28, 1900.

25 Kendall County Record, October 15, 1902.

26 Extracted from When Lisbon was a Prairie, by Mrs. John L. Shufelt, 1917.

27 Kendall County Record, June 23, 1870.

28 Kendall County Record, January 18, 1888.

29 History of Kendall County, Rev. E. W. Hicks, 1877, p. 146.

30 Mr. Spencer claimed to have built the first school house in Lisbon Township. According to him he had personally hewed out every stick of timber for the school’s walls.

Kendall County Record, August 11, 1870.

31 Lisbon Comet, July 2, 1896.

32 Henry Sherrill bought the large stone stage house in 1844.

33 Kendall County Record, September 14, 1871.

34 Kendall County Record, September 14, 1871.

35 Little Rock Press, February 11, 1854.

36 History of Kendall County, Rev. E. W. Hicks, 1877, p. 264.

37 Kendall County Record, September 24, 1874.

38 Kendall County Record, June 6, 1875.

39 Kendall County Record, December 13, 1877.

40 Kendall County Record, January 24, 1878.

41 Kendall County Record, March 18, 1880.

42 Kendall County Record, September 14, 1880.

43 Kendall County Record March 13, 1884.

44 Kendall County Record, March 4, 1885.

45 Kendall County Record, August 24, 1887.

46 Kendall County Record, November 20, 1873.

47 Kendall County Record, December 25, 1873.

48 At this time, the noon meal was called dinner. The evening meal was supper.

49 Kendall County Record, January 29, 1874.

50 Kendall County Record, July 8, 1875.

51 Kendall County Record, January 11, 1877.

52 Kendall County Record, August 15, 1878.

53 Kendall County Record, May 22, 1879.

54 Kendall County Record, May 23, 1881.

55 Kendall County Record, June 23, 1881.

56 Kendall County Record, March 19, 1882.

57 Kendall County Record, March 29, 1883.

58 Kendall County Record, August 9, 1883.

59 Kendall County Record, June 6, 1888.

60 Kendall County Record, September 12, 1888.

61 Kendall County Record, July 1, 1891.

62 Kendall County Record, June 29, 1892.

63 Kendall County Record, September 21, 1892.

64 Kendall County Record, August 30, 1899.

65 Kendall County News, October 27, 1899.

66 Kendall County Record, March 12, 1902.

67 Kendall County Record, April 24, 1907.

68 Kendall County Record, June 8, 1887.

69 Kendall County Record, July 11, 1894.

70 Timothy Worsley was the principal partner in Worsley and Foster. Timothy and Abigail Worsley's daughter, Emily Frances, married Timothy's partner Samuel Edward Foster.

71 Kendall County Record, April 4, 1872.

72 Kendall County Record, October 28, 1875.

73 Kendall County Record, June 7, 1877.

74 Kendall County Record, August 5, 1880.

75 Kendall County Record, September 23, 1880.

76 Kendall County Record, June 23, 1881.

77 Kendall County Record, December 4, 1881.

78 Kendall County Record, December 15, 1881.

79 Kendall County Record, May 8, 1884.

80 Kendall County Record, September 27, 1916.

81 Kendall County Record, June 15, 1887.

82 Kendall County Record, November 22, 1905

83 Kendall County Record, August 11, 1909.

84 Kendall County Record, August 18, 1881.

85 Kendall County Record, June 1, 1887.

86 Kendall County Record, May 2, 1878

87 Kendall County Record, July 10, 1895.

88 Kendall County Record, August 28, 1895.

89 Kendall County Record, March 11, 1896.

90 Kendall County Courier, March 28, 1855.

91 Kendall County Record, July 22, 1880.

92 Possibly Hopkins.

93 Kendall County Record, April 6, 1893.

94 Kendall County Record, June 26, 1856.

95 Kendall County Record, March 29, 1866.

96 Kendall County Record, November 15, 1866.

97 Kendall County Record, August 8, 1867.

98 Kendall County Record, January 28, 1869.

99 Kendall County Record, October 3, 1872.

100 Kendall County Record, June 5, 1873.

101 Kendall County Record, November 5, 1874.

102 Kendall County Record, June 3, 1875.

103 Kendall County Record, July 25, 1875.

104 Kendall County Record February 8, 1877.

105 Kendall County Record, February 21, 1878.

106 Kendall County Record, February 12, 1880.

107 Kendall County Record, March 31, 1881.

108 Kendall County Record, October 15, 1868.

109 Kendall County Record, October 29, 1868.

110 Kendall County Record, February 25, 1869.

111 Kendall County Record, April 20, 1871.

112 Kendall County Record, March 27, 1907.

113 Kendall County Record, August 8, 1872.

114 Kendall County Record, July 10, 1873.

115 Kendall County Record, March 13, 1879.

116 Kendall County Record, April 1, 1880.

117 Kendall County Record, April 22, 1880.

118 Kendall County Record, July 8, 1880.

119 Kendall County Record, August 5, 1880.

120 Kendall County Record, September 2, 1880.

121 Kendall County Record, September 16, 1880.

122 Kendall County Record, January 6, 1881.

123 Kendall County Record, November 19, 1884.

124 Kendall County Record, May 13. 1885.

125 Kendall County Record, May 27, 1885.

126 Kendall County Record, January 23, 1889.

127 Kendall County Record, August 5, 1891.

128 Kendall County Record, March 19, 1896.

129 Kendall County Record February 24, 1897.

130 Kendall County Record, August 24, 1898.

131 Kendall County Record, October 5, 1898.

132 Kendall County News, May 1, 1901.

133 Kendall County Record, May 7, 1902.

134 Kendall County News, May 7, 1902.

135 Kendall County News, December 24, 1902.

136 Kendall County News, February 4, 1903.

137 Kendall County Record, December 31, 1902.

138 Kendall County News, March 20, 1912.

139 Kendall County Record, June 21, 1916.

140 Kendall County Record, December 22, 1920.

141 Kendall County News, June 15, 1927.

142 Kendall County News, November 18, 1936.

143 See Heustis Hotel.

144 Kendall County Record, March 31, 1870.

145 Kendall County Record, February 23, 1882.

146 Kendall County Record, November 10, 1870.

147 Kendall County Record, October, 26, 1871.

148 Kendall County Record, February 13, 1873.

149 Kendall County Record, September 4, 1873.

150 Kendall County Record, November 13, 1873.

151 Kendall County Record, December 4, 1874.

152 Kendall County Record, June 21, 1883.

153 Married October 31, 1883, Kendall County Marriage Records.

154 Kendall County Record, November 26, 1884.

155 Kendall County Record, December 12, 1894.

156 Kendall County Record, December 3, 1884.

157 Kendall County Record, December 16, 1885.

158 Kendall County Record, November 20, 1889.

159 Legal documents research by Herb Beck, Paw Paw, MI.

160 Kendall County built a three-story brick office building on the site.

161 Kendall County Record, October 9, 1889.

162 Kendall County Record, November 6, 1889.

163 Kendall County Record, November 13, 1889.

164 Kendall County Record, November 20, 1889.

165 Kendall County Record, December 11, 1889.

166 Kendall County Record, December 11, 1889.

167 Kendall County Record, December 16, 1891

168 Kendall County Record, March 30, 1892.

169 Kendall County Record, March 21, 1894.

170 Kendall County Record, March 9, 1892.

171 Kendall County Record, March 9, 1892.

172 Kendall County Record, June 22, 1892.

173 Kendall County Record, July 6, 1892.

174 Kendall County Record, July 13, 1892.

175 Kendall County Record, November 16, 1892.

176 Kendall County Record, March 16, 1898.

177 Kendall County Record, March 23, 1898.

178 Kendall County Record, June 12, 1901.

179 Kendall County Record, May 3, 1911.

180 Kendall County Record, October 7, 1914.

181 Kendall County Record, December 1, 1864.

182 Kendall County Record, August 10, 1865.

183 Kendall County Record, July 19, 1866.

184 Kendall County Record, March 17, 1870.

185Kendall County Record, March 31, 1870.

186 Kendall County Record, January 12, 1871.

187 Kendall County Record, January 9, 1873.

188 Kendall County Record, February 6, 1873.

189 Kendall County Record, June 19, 1873.

190 Kendall County Record, May 14, 1874.

191 Kendall County Record, October 28, 1875.

192 Kendall County Record, February 10, 1880.

193 Kendall County Record, January 13, 1881.

194 Kendall County Record, February 10, 1881.

195 Kendall County Record, August 4, 1881.

196 Kendall County Record, November 17, 1881.

197 Kendall County Record, October 5, 1882.

198 Kendall County Record, May 10, 1883.

199 Kendall County Record, May 29, 1884.

200 Kendall County Record, October 8, 1884.

201 Kendall County Record, June 19, 1889.

202 Kendall County Record, November 6, 1889.

203 Kendall County Record, June 3, 1891.

204Kendall County Record, October 28, 1891.

205Kendall County Record, October 12, 1892.

206 Legal documents researched by Herb Beck, Paw Paw, MI

207Kendall County Record, December 15, 1870.

208 Kendall County Record, March 31, 1870.

209 Kendall County Record, March 5, 1924.

210 Kendall County Record, December 12, 1894.

211 Kendall County Record, December 16, 1885.

212 Kendall County Record, March 12, 1890.

213 Kendall County Record, November 16, 1892.

214 Kendall County Record, March 9, 1898.

215 Also spelled Dersey.

216 Kendall County Record, October 31, 1906.

217 Kendall County Record, November 21, 1906.

218 Mrs. Behlke was Justus’ cousin.

219 Kendall County Record, May 12, 1915.

220 Kendall County Record, March 8, 1916.

221 Kendall County Record, July 9, 1919.

222 Kendall County Record, July 15, 1925.

223 Kendall County Record, April 14, 1926.

224 Kendall County Record, September 22, 1926.

225 Kendall County Record, May 4, 1938.

226 Kendall County Record, May 24, 1939.



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