Old Yorkville Homes & Businesses: Black's First Addition

Compiled by Elmer Dickson

Preface

Unless otherwise noted, the information below was acquired from Kendall County Courthouse records.

Information acquired from Kendall County Newspapers will appear in a border box like this one including the following citation at the top:
Source: Kendall County Newspapers

 

Block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Downtown Yorkville

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 201 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: north half of lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the southwest corner of South Bridge Street and West Hydraulic Avenue.

Building was constructed for Yorkville merchants Crooker and Hobbs. Construction began in March 1858 and was competed in May 1858.

Building was the first commercial building in downtown Yorkville and is still standing.

 

Crooker & Hobbs General Store (May 1858 – December 1872

Franklin M. Hobbs General Store (December 1872 – February 1899)

Franklin M. Hobbs & Sons General Store, Franklin M., Charles F. & Sidney F. Hobbs proprietors (February 1899 - 1901)

Kendall County Record’s first office was on the second floor of Crooker & Hobbs General Store.

William F. Thompson Tailor on the second floor (March 1869 –

Photograph Gallery, Fred G. Winne photographer (May 1882 – August 1883)

Photograph Gallery, Frank Whitney & D. J. Hoff proprietors (November 1884 – after April 1886)

Photograph Gallery, Charles Sabin photographer Mr. Sabin was in Yorkville in January 1887 and September 1891. He could have arrived earlier and left later.

Photograph Gallery, S. Benensohn proprietor (May 1893 – August 1901)

Photograph Gallery, Charles E. Jessup proprietor (August 1901 - )

Photograph Gallery, Herman Krueger proprietor ( - January 1913)

Photograph Gallery, Miss Louise Hill proprietor (January 1913 – January 1922)

Friedberg Dry Goods Store, William & Oscar Friedberg proprietors (1901 –

Miss Hill Photography Studio on the second floor

Dr. Lyman A. Perkins, medical offices on the second floor (August 1932 –

Dr. Ivan R. Dickson dental office on the second floor, (November 1932 -

 

In 1856, Mr. Crooker and his son-in-law, Franklin M. Hobbs, started a general merchandise store on the northwest corner of Center and Spring Streets. In May of 1858, they moved their store to the south side of the river, making it the first store in Yorkville.168

 

The first office of the Kendall County Record was located upstairs in the building located at the southwest corner of Bridge Street and Hydraulic Avenue in Yorkville owned by Crooker and Hobbs.169

 

Advertisement for William F. Thompson Tailor Shop in the room over Crooker & Hobbs Store.170

 

Fred G. Winne, our photographer, has decided to stay among us, much to the satisfaction of his many friends. He has leased the rooms over Hobbs store on the corner. He will have the latest improved skylights and the most modern scenery, and will soon be prepared to start up business again. As a photographer, Fred cannot be beat anywhere.

Note: Mr. Winne opened his first photograph gallery over George M. Johnson’s store.171

 

Fred Winne has a neat and attractive reception room for his new photographic gallery over Hobb’s store. Yorkville can boast of a well-appointed gallery and first-class artist. Call and get your handsome face photographed.172

 

Advertisement for F. G. Winne photographer, Yorkville, with studio rooms over F. M. Hobb’s store. As I have good and convenient rooms and the latest improved skylight, I am enabled to guarantee satisfaction in all work. I have a variet of studio accessories such as indoor and outdoor and cottage window scenery, etc. I also copy and enlarge pictures. You will also find a stock of carefully selected frames of every pattern and design.173

 

Fred G. Winne, photographer, studio rooms over Franklin M. Hobb’s store. As I have good and convenient rooms and the latest improvements in skylights, I am able to guarantee satisfaction in all work. I have a variety of studio accessories such as indoor and outdoor and cottage window scenery, etc. Old pictures may be copied and enlarged. You will also find a stock of carefully selected frames of every pattern and design.174

 

Fred G. Winne died August 9, 1883 as a very young man. He was only twenty-years of age at the time of his death.175

 

Mr. Hoff, of New York has gone in partnership with Frank Whitney in the photograph business. Their gallery is overt the Franklin M. Hobbs store.176

 

Our Yorkville photographer, Mr. D. J. Hoff, is having remarkable success in making good pictures. His reception room is made most attractive by the exhibition of the pictures of a large number of our people, young and old. He finishes his work in artistic style, so that it compares favorably with pictures made by the best artists in Chicago.177

 

The stores at Hobb’s corner are assuming the old-time business aspect, and are growing in importance. Mr. Friedberg has placed a fine selection of dry goods and notions in the north store, and Frank Crum has a choice assortment of fancy groceries. The doorway between the two stores is opened and you may buy from either store without going outdoors.178

 

The Hobbs block in Yorkville, owned by Franklin M. Hobbs, has been sold to William Friedberg and George Ohse. This deal was completed the last of the week through the efforts of George Arundale and the transfer made at once. There is no definite plan as to what changes will be made in the building at the present but it is understood that the improvement of the block will be started soon. Glen M. Hobbs was out from Chicago to represent the interests of the father who is in California.179

 

Those wishing hand painted place cards, tally cards, score cards, programs, menu cards, pictures, post cards, etc., may obtain them of Miss Clara Howes by sending in order two weeks ahead of time. Samples may be seen and prices obtained at Miss Hill’s studio.180

 

Mr. Friedberg has enlarged his store on South Bridge Street and with more space and a more complete stock he added a much need essential in the way of a ladies’ rest room with toilet accessories. Mr. Friedberg has taken over the second floor of the building, formerly the photograph gallery, and has remodeled it throughout. The ladies department is on the main floor in the front of the store. The household department is on the second floor. At present, Mr. Friedberg carries linoleum, rugs, shades and other necessities for the home. In the future he will add furniture to his complete line.

For many, old memories will be awakened when the news is out that the old photograph gallery with its skylight is out. Older citizens will remember Charles Sabin, Fred G. Winne, Mr. Benensohn and in later years Charles E. Jessup, Herman Krueger and Miss Louise Hill.181

 

Friedberg’s Dry Goods store on the corner of South Bridge Street and Hydraulic Avenue, celebrated its 30th anniversary January 15. The business was bought by William and Oscar Friedberg, who came from Kinsman, Illinois and bought out F. M. Hobbs and Sons. William, the older brother passed away and Oscar has been in charge of the business since.182

 

Dr. L. A. Perkins, who has been practicing in Aurora for some time is returning to Yorkville and is fitting the second story of Friedberg’s store up for his office. The doctor expects to move into his new office the latter part of this week.183

 

Dr. L. A. Perkins is having the second floor of the building which houses the Friedberg store remodeled. Herman and Garrett Halbesma and Freeman Perkins are doing the painting and papering. Dr. Perkins’ new office will be ready for occupancy Saturday and Dr. Perkins will renew his practice in Yorkville after a short absence.184

 

Dr. Ivan R. Dickson has opened an office for the practice of dentistry, above Oscar Friedberg’s Dry Goods store. He will be in the office Wednesday and Thursday, both day and evening. For the balance of the week he will be taking care of his practice at Princeton, Illinois, where he is equipped with x-ray and diagnostic apparatus. For appointment call Yorkville 76-M.185

 

Street address: 203 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: south half of lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

The building was completed in December 1888.

 

Franklin M. Hobbs Grocery

H. A. Holland Grocery & Restaurant (April 1876 - )

Crum Grocery, Frank Crum proprietor (February 1901 – November 1903)

Jeter Grocery, Oscar Jeter proprietor (December 1903 – July 1904)

Ohse Grocery, George Ohse proprietor (April 1907 -)

Milton Frankenhauser Grocery

Ralph Shick Grocery

 

Captain Hobbs is getting material on the ground next to his dry goods store to construct a building for groceries. It will be a two-story brick building 70 feet deep.186

 

The foundation wall of Hobb’s new store is being laid.187

 

Captain Hobb’s new store is being plastered.188

 

Last week the stock of groceries were removed from the old stand to the handsome new brick store adjoining the dry goods store. The new store is in a two-story brick building with twenty-three feet of frontage and is 70 feet deep. The ceiling is of varnished Georgia pine and is very attractive. The furnishings are all cherry stained. The shelves, drawers and cupboards are all of the latest designs. The central feature of the store is the plate glass front with two large panes of plate glass that cost some fifty dollars each. The fancy groceries and crockery goods are in the front of the store and the heavier goods are in the rear of the store. Bulky barrels, boxes and bales are kept in the back room.189

 

H. A. Holland has removed his grocery and restaurant from Hubbard’s basement to McMurtire’s late stand, second house (business) north of the railway track. He will keep a good line of staple and fancy goods. He will keep all kinds of staple and fancy groceries, all kinds of confectionery, nuts, oranges, lemons and fruit as they come in season. Boarders by the day will be accepted, meals are 25 cents. We will also carry a good line of ladies notions; fancy chromos, frames, etc.

 

The stores at Hobb’s corner are assuming the old-time business aspect, and are growing in importance. Mr. Friedberg has placed a fine selection of dry goods and notions in the north store, and Frank Crum has a choice assortment of fancy groceries. The doorway between the two stores is opened and you may buy from either store without going outdoors.190

 

Frank Crum conducted a fancy grocery store in Yorkville for about three years before exchanging it for land in South Dakota owned by Yorkville real estate dealer, George Mewhirter in 1903…. It is thought that Mr. Mewhirter has a buyer for the grocery business who will take off of his hands. Possession will be given the first of December.191

 

Oscar Jeter buys the Crum grocery from George Mewhirter. The deal closed last week whereby Mr. Crum disposed of his fancy grocery house to George Mewhirter in part payment on a big tract of land in South Dakota. On Monday night, Oscar Jeter bought the business and will be the new merchant. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Jeter from south of Yorkville, and is well and favorably known here, having spent nearly two years as clerk in the grocery stores of A. P. Hill and B. A. Cotton.

The nature of the business will not be changed and he will cater to your grocery wants with all the care and attention of an experienced clerk and merchant. The stocks will always be kept fresh and up to date, and he assures the trading public prompt attention to all orders, either or the phone or personally.192

 

The grocery store of Oscar Jeter in Yorkville was closed Monday. Oscar has traded his stock for some western land, and goes out of business here.193

 

The vacant portion of the Hobbs building on Bridge Street is being entirely repapered and repainted and put in tiptop shape to accommodate the grocery stock of George Ohse, who will move from the Nading building.194

 

George Ohse opened for business in the Hobbs block Monday Morning. All of his stock and fixtures were moved Saturday night.195

 

The Hobbs block in Yorkville, owned by Franklin M. Hobbs, has been sold to William Friedberg and George Ohse. This deal was completed the last of the week through the efforts of George Arundale and the transfer made at once. There is no definite plan as to what changes will be made in the building at the present but it is understood that the improvement of the block will be started soon. Glen M. Hobbs was out from Chicago to represent the interests of the father who is in California.196

 

Lot 1: E. A. Black and wife to Jacob P. Black, lot 1, block 1 and lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1858, $100.

Lot 1: Jacob P. Black and wife to Crooker & Hobbs, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 26, 1864, $1,000.

Lot 1: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black and wives to Wellington Mason, lot 1, block 4, and east half of lot 2, block 9 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 5, 1870, $250.

Lot 1: Isaac Crooker and wife to Franklin M. Hobbs, undivided half of lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 14, 1873, $2,250.

Lot 1: Franklin M. Hobbs to William Friedberg and George Ohse, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, $6,000.

Lot 1: Rose and Joseph Bymel to Lillian Schwartz, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1932.

Lot 1: Paula Klein and William Sugarman to Lillian Schwartz, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1932.

 

Franklin M. Hobbs, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $800.

 

Franklin M. Hobbs, lots 1 & lot 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $800.

 

Franklin M. Hobbs, lots 1 & lot 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $800.

 

William Friedberg & George Ohse, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,300.

 

William Friedberg & George Ohse, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $4,440.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 205 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lots are on the west side of South Bridge Street, downtown Yorkville.

A frame building was built here by Fred Miller [Moeller] who operated a grocery store.

 

Wood Grocery, Haskell R. Wood proprietor (1859 – circa 1860?)

Lehman General Store, Leopold Lehman proprietor, ( - February 1866)

Sinclair & Moeller Grocery Store & Dry Goods, David Sinclair & Fred Miller [Moeller] proprietors (circa 1868-71 - )

Hass Jeweler, Albert Haas proprietor (February 1879 - )

Starr Meat Market, R. & George G. Starr proprietors (December 1881 - February 1888)

Weaver & Hallock Meat Market (February 1888 - )

Reddock Barber Shop, John E. Reddock proprietor (

 

In 1856, Mr. Crooker and his son-in-law, Franklin M. Hobbs, started a general merchandise store on the northwest corner of Center and Spring Streets in Bristol. In May of 1858, they moved their store to the south side of the river, making it the first store in Yorkville.197

Crooker and Hobbs were succeeded by Lyman Childs and his son-in-law, Haskell R. Wood in the same building in Bristol. The firm was named Childs and Wood and engaged in a general merchandise business. During the summer of 1859 the firm was dissolved. After the dissolution, Mr. Wood opened a store in downtown Yorkville in the building that became Reddock’s barber shop. The store was only open for a relative short period of time. Eventually Haskell took up the study of medicine and became Dr. Haskell R. Wood and established a practice in Galesburg, IL, where he died February 25, 1909.198

 

At one time, Leopold Lehman and Captain Franklin M. Hobbs had the only two stores on the south side of the river.199

 

Albert Haas opened a watch repair business in the Dyer building.200

Our Yorkville jeweler has quietly pulled up stakes and gone. Jewelers don’t seem to thrive well in Yorkville.201

 

R. & G. Starr take this method of informing the people of Yorkville, Bristol and vicinity that they have opened a new meat market in Yorkville in the Dyer building, the first door south of Hobbs’ store, where they will keep at all times a full supply of the choicest meats, and sell at reasonable prices.202

 

John Reddock, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $260.

 

John Reddock, north half lot 2, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $260.

 

John Reddock, north half lot 2, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $260.

 

John Reddock, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $800.

 

John Reddock, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,640.

 

 

Street address: 209 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lots are on the west side of South Bridge Street, downtown Yorkville.

Building was built by Gottfried “Fred” Haas in the fall of 1871.

 

Haas Saloon, Gottfried “Fred” Haas proprietor, (January 1871 - March 1880)

John A. Beeman Temperance Billiard Hall

Reuben W. Willett Implement and Hardware (March 1880 - )

Rasmussen, Pedersen & Bretthauer Dry Goods, Julius Rasmussen, George M. Pedersen & Fred Bretthauer proprietors ( - February 1906)

Reingardt & Hardekopf Grocery (March 1906 – December 1911)

Ament, George D., Dentist, office on second floor (August 1909 - )

Alderson, A. S., M.D., offices on second floor (August 1909 - )

Tendall Grocery, L. O. Tendall proprietor (January 1912 – January 1913)

Charles G. Hardekopf Grocery (January 1913 – January 1916)

McDowell Grocery & Meat Market, Oliver A. McDowell proprietor (February 1916 - December 1916)

Yorkville Motor Company (A. K. A. Wright Motor Company) Ford Automobile & Implement Agency; & General Store, Fred L. Wright proprietor (circa 1917 - )

Folks Restaurant, a. k. a. Dog House Restaurant

Barley Fork Restaurant, George & Ione Lane proprietors (July 1942 – July 1964)

Yorkville Appliance & Furniture, Homer G. Dickson & Ira Perkins proprietors

Yorkville Appliance & Furniture, Ira Perkins proprietor

Yorkville Appliance & Furniture,

Yorkville Appliance & Furniture, LeRoy “Bud” & Marilyn Thanepohn proprietors

Little Joe’s Bar & Grill

Kendall Pub

 

Haas’ new building adjoining Lee’s drug store in Yorkville is up, and the roof is being put on. The two stores make a handsome block. The finish on the outside is a counterpart of Lee’s. Paul C. Dearborn did the mason work. The wood work was done by Helme & Dolph.203

 

William Reingardt and Charlie Hardekopf have had carpenters and painters at work in the store building vacated by Pedersen & Bretthauer’s dry goods department, getting it ready for their occupancy as a grocery store. The boys will have to put in a big stock to fill all that space.204

 

Dr. George D. Ament, dentist and Dr. A. S. Alderson, M. D. are preparing to change their quarters from the present locations to the rooms over the Hardekopf grocery store, which have been put in shape for them. City water has been installed and the interior papered and painted. Dr. Ament has prepared to have his equipment of the latest designs and will have as complete an office as those in larger cities. They expect to move the last of this week.205

 

Charles G. Hardekopf has restarted in the grocery business having taken over the store of L. O. Tendall in Yorkville. The store went into the hands of Mr. Tendall about a year ago when he came from Oklahoma to Yorkville. Both gentlemen are cordial and courteous tradesmen, carrying excellent lines. While many are glad to welcome Mr. Hardekopf back to the trade they are sorry to part with Mr. Tendall.206

 

The increase in the business at the poultry warehouse has been so great that Charles G. Hardekopf has been forced to abandon his grocery business in favor of his new line. He will, therefore, offer exceptionally low prices for cash only on his entire stock of groceries beginning Monday morning January 10. The building in which his grocery is located is also for sale. Mr. Hardekopf offers some rare bargains, better get in early and get them.207

 

Oliver A. McDowell has closed a deal through the June Hubbard agency whereby he will take possession of the Charles G. Hardekopf grocery with its remaining stock on Monday February 7. He will move his present store to the new location on that date and continue to handle his grocery and market. Mr. Hardekopf will retire from the retail business and devote his entire time to his storage plant and warehouse.208

 

The auction sale which was run last week by O. A. McDowell was ended Friday evening, with very satisfactory results. The people of Yorkville are sorry to have this grocery and meat market closed. Mr. McDowell has made no definite plans for the future but will live in Yorkville until he decides what he will do.209

 

The Hardekopf building, occupied by Fred L. Wright, was sold at auction, Saturday, to William Henne. The price was $3,200.210

 

Fred L. Wright is adding an addition to his store building on South Bridge Street. The addition of 100 feet to the west will give the Yorkville Motor Company some valuable floor space.211

 

In July 1925 the Yorkville Motor Company was the local agency for the Ford Motor Company.212

 

Announcing a new Ford dealer, Wright Motor Company, Yorkville, Illinois. In keeping with the Ford Motor Company police of providing the highest type of representation in each community, the Wright Motor Company has been selected to handle the sale and service of Ford cars and trucks…….213

 

Yorkville welcomed a new business house, Saturday, when the Barley Fork Restaurant opened with Mr. and Mrs. George Lane as owners. The restaurant is named by a fork over a century old hanging from the beams.

A visit to the premises last Friday revealed a splendid, immaculate setup for serving meals and ice cream dishes. Some novel ideas will be introduced among them a basket lunch and barley soup.

The Lanes occupy the building which housed the Dog House.214

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black and wives to Halvor Hanson, lot 2, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 25, 1858, $50.

Lot 2: Halvor Hanson to Andrew Knudson, et al, lot 2, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 9, 1861, $760.

Lot 2: Mary Ann Newton, et al, to Samuel A. Hale, I. C. Deed, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 28, 1864, $1.

Lot 2: Andrew Knudson to Eric Nelson, lot 2, block 1, September 29, 1864, $30.

Lot 2: Leopold Lehman to Frederick W. Neidert, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 20, 1866, $1,600.

Lot 2: Frederick W. Neidert & wife to Albert M. Hobbs, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 3, 1867, $200.

Lot 2: Frederick W. Neidert & wife to David Sinclair, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 8, 1868, $2000.

Lot 2: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Theresa Haas, south half of lots 2 and 10, block 1 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, $2,500.

Lot 2: Albert M. Hobbs to Gottfried Haas, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 12, 1871, $500.

Lot 2: Gottfried & Louisa Haas, to John A. Beeman, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 22, 1872, $2,000.

Lot 2: Theresa Haas to Gottfried Haas, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 13, 1872, $1,000.

Lot 2: David Sinclair & wife to Silas G. Dyer, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 20, 1875, $3,000.

Lot 2: Gottfried Haas & wife to Reuben W. Willett, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 6, 1880, $2,500.

Lot 2: Randall Cassem & wife to Thornton Ware (sic Ward?), lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 27, 1884, $275.

Lot 2: Thornton Ward (sic Ware?) to Silas Dyer, lots 2 and 10, block 1, March 27, 1884.

Lot 2: Clement J. & Arthur Dyer & wives to Silas Dyer, north half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 25, 1884, $100.

Lot 2: Susan C. Dial & husband to Silas Dyer, north half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 13, 1885, $350.

Lot 2: Silas Dyer & wife to Frank A. Weaver, north half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 7, 1886, $1,400.

Lot 2: Frank A. Weaver, et al, to John A. Reddock, north half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 31, 1891, $1,500.

Lot 2: Jacksonville Bank to Nels O. Cassem, south half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1902, $2,600.

Lot 2: Heirs of Nels O. Cassem to August Lippold, south half of lots 2 and 3, and lots 10 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and lots 2, 3 and 4 block 4; and lots 2 and 7, block 10, Hopkins’ Addition to Yorkville, January 1906, $6,464.

Lot 2: August Lippold to Charles G. Hardekopf, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1910, $3,200.

Lot 2: Charles Hardekopf to Fred L. Wright, south half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1920, $3,000.

 

Reuben W. Willett, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $440.

 

Nels O. Cassem, south half lot 2, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $440.

 

August Lippold, south half of lot 2, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $440.

 

Fred Wright, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,300.

 

Fred Wright, south half lots 2 and 10 and north half of lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $3,200.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: 211 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: north half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Built by Samuel Atkinson for George R. Lee in 1868.

 

Lee Drug Store, George R. Lee proprietor (1868 - )

J. C. Goodale Jeweler located in Lee’s Drug Store (1870 – January 1871)

C. A. Hayes Jeweler located in Lee’s Drug Store (January 1871 - )

Hayes Millinery, Miss Mary Hayes proprietor on the second floor (1870 - )

Gillis Dressmaking, Miss Orrie Gillis proprietor (1873 - )

King Jeweler, W. D. King proprietor, (February 1874 - )

Yorkville Post Office, A. T. Seely postmaster (June 1869 – March 1876)

Seely Dry Goods, Absalom Townsend “Town” Seely proprietor (June 1876 – January 1902)

Seely Drug Store, Absalom Townsend “Town” Seely proprietor (June 1876 - January 1902)

Ruby Jewelry & Watch Repair, George N. Ruby proprietor (August 1893 - )

Hill Drug Store, Fred G. Hill proprietor (January 1902 – April 1922)

Hill Drug Store, Fred G. Hill & Son, Fred G. & Alvah L. Hill proprietors (January 1907 - )

Webster Drug Store, Homer D. “Dan” Webster proprietor (April 1922 - )

 

George R. Lee, the druggist will build a two-story brick building 22 by 40 feet where his store is now. He will move his old building to the rear of the new structure giving him a store room nearly 70 feet long. He has let the contract to Mr. Samuel Atkinson.215

 

J. C. Goodale, watchmaker and jeweler was located in the new drug store opposite Union Hall.216

 

Advertisement for A. T. Seely druggist located in the post office building.217

 

George R. Lee, druggist was located in the brick store opposite Union Hall.218

 

C. A. Hayes, of Sandwich, has come to Yorkville to engage in the watch, clock and jewelry business.219

 

Haas’ new building adjoining Lee’s drug store in Yorkville is up, and the roof is being put on. The two stores make a handsome block. The finish on the outside is a counterpart of Lee’s. Paul C. Dearborn did the mason work. The wood work was done by Helme & Dolph.220

 

Yorkville has a new Jeweler. Mr. W. D. King has opened a shop for repairing jewelry, watches, etc. at Lee’s Drug Store, where he will be glad to see all who have any work in this line that they wish done.221

 

Absalom T. Seely sells out to Fred G. Hill.222

 

Having sold an interest in my Drug Business in Yorkville to my son Alvah L. Hill, the name of the firm will be changed to Fred G. Hill & Son. There will be not material change in the management of the business, and we hope for the same cordial business relations with our friends as heretofore.223

 

George N. Ruby, the local jeweler, is a genius when it comes to fixing a typewriter, or some other intricate machine, in a hurry.224

 

The Yorkville law offices of Charles A. Darnell, Master in Chancery and Oliver A. Burkhart, States Attorney were located over Hill’s Drug Store.225

 

Dr. F. M. Groner has rented the offices over the Hill and Webster store and will soon start the practice of medicine in Yorkville and vicinity. Dr. Groner is a graduate of the Chicago Medical College and has been serving his time at one of the Chicago hospitals. He will complete his term as an intern in December and expects to be here a few days of each week until he can more here permanently.226

 

Homer D. Webster has bought the interest of Fred G. Hill in the Rexall Drug Store, Yorkville, and will conduct the business under his name from now on. The continued ill health of Mr. Hill has forced him to retire from active business life and it is hoped that his departure from business connections will permit him to regain his strength. Mr. Webster came to Yorkville a few years ago as a registered pharmacist for Hill and Ruby…..

Mr. Hill is one of Yorkville’s oldest businessmen. He began his training as a drug clerk with A. T. Seely so long ago that the present generation does not remember. The death of Mr. Seely made it possible for Mr. Hill to take over the business and he has been exceptionally successful. Mr. Hill is an affable gentleman and salesman with a pleasing personality. The community has missed him during his enforced retirement from active work and look forward to his early recovery.227

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. Black & wife to George R. Lee & Edward E. Gould, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1, 1866, $500.

Lot 3: Edward E. Gould to George R. Lee, undivided half of the north half of lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 24, 1867, $300.

Lot 3: George R. Lee & wife to A. T. Seely, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 22, 1876, $3,000.

Lot 3: Helena S. Carpenter, et al, to Homer D. and Edna B. Webster, north half of lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1931.

 

Absalom T. Seely, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $440.

 

Absalom T. Seely, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $440.

 

Street address: 213 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the west side of South Bridge Street, downtown Yorkville.

Brick building was built in 1870, and was known as the Hopkins Building.

 

Rasmussen, Pedersen & Bretthauer Dry Goods, Julius Rasmussen, George M. Pedersen & Fred Bretthauer proprietors (1870 - )

Photograph Gallery, Merritt C. Pratt proprietor (April 1871 – circa July 1871)

Pedersen & Bretthauer Groceries, George M. Pedersen & Fred Bretthauer proprietors (1894 – October 1910)

Bretthauer & Lane Groceries, Fred Bretthauer & Roy E. Lane proprietors (October 1910 - August 1915)

Moore’s Market, A. H. “Allie” and Fred Moore proprietors (April 1922 – )

Barley Fork Restaurant, George & Ione Lane proprietors (July 1942 – July 1964) (Check the foregoing entry for place and time.)

Family Restaurant

Olympic Flame Restaurant

Bridge Street Cafe

 

The new rooms fitted up as a photograph gallery by Mr. Pratt in the Hopkins’ building, Yorkville, are as pleasant and neat as any we have seen our to the cities. They are now prepared to take pictures and the ladies and gentlemen of Kendall County are invited to call and see the rooms and inspect samples of his work.228

 

A. H. Moore & Son are moving their meat market from the old location by the bridge to their newly acquired building up the street to the Hopkins’ building. The firm recently purchased the brick building from the Hopkins Estate, the rumored price being $4,000. Monday they started moving their fine new refrigerating machine into the new location. This will make a fine place for the meat market. Because it is wide and roomy, it is said that a line of canned goods will be added to the line of fresh and smoked meats.229

 

Allie and Fred Moore have moved their meat market into the building recently purchased from the Hopkins Estate and will care for their customers from the new location. The warm weather forced the change a little sooner than calculated but the meat had to be cared for where there was refrigeration. The new location is an excellent one and will be one of the show stores in Yorkville as soon as the place is settled. There is a brand new and large refrigerator cooled by a refrigeration plant of modern design. The place is spotless and airy; an ideal market.230

 

Fred (Bretthauer) remained at home assisting his father and attending school until he was 16, when he entered the employ of Morton and Johnson as a clerk. He worked there for three years and returned to his father’s farm where he worked for four years. Mr. Bretthauer returned to Yorkville, where he was employed by Mr. Hobbs for twelve years, after which he formed a partnership with George M. Pedersen and opened a business know as Pederson and Bretthauer. In October 1910, Mr. Pedersen sold his interest in the business to Roy E. Lane and the Bretthauer and Lane business came into existence. Mr. Lane conducted one store in which dry goods were handled, and Mr. Bretthauer conducted the grocery line in another store.

In 1915 Mr. Bretthauer retired to enter private life. His son, Harlan W. Bretthauer, continued his interests in the business. 231

 

Yorkville welcomed a new business house, Saturday, when the Barley Fork Restaurant opened with Mr. and Mrs. George Lane as owners. The restaurant is named by a fork over a century old hanging from the beams.

A visit to the premises last Friday revealed a splendid, immaculate setup for serving meals and ice cream dishes. Some novel ideas will be introduced among them a basket lunch and barley soup.

The Lanes occupy the building which housed the Dog House.232

 

Lot 3: Washington Thomas to Jacob P. Black, lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 29, 1864, $500.

Lot 3: Jacob P. Black & wife to Adolph Stolp, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1, 1872, $450.

Lot 3: Adolph Stolp & wife to Jesse H. Bridgens, south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 21, 1874, $1,000.

Lot 3: Jesse H. Bridgens & wife to Eliza A. Green, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1878, $2,000.

Lot 3: Eliza A. Green to Catherine J. Bridgens (Mrs. Jesse), south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 21, 1878, $2,000.

Lot 3: Jesse H. Bridgens, et al, to Edward C. and Percy W. Bridgens, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892, $1,600.

Lot 3: Edward C. and Percy W. Bridgens to Nels O. Cassem, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892, $2,750.

Lot 3: Percy W. Bridgens to Edward C. Bridgens, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1895, $250.

Lot 3: Edward C. Bridgens to John C. Hopkins, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1895, $3,000.

Lot 3: Master in Chancery to Nels O. Cassem, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1899, $3,287.35

Lot 3: Heirs of Nels O. Cassem to August Lippold, south half of lots 2 and 3, and lots 10 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and lots 2, 3 and 4 block 4; and lots 2 and 7, block 10, Hopkins’ Addition to Yorkville, January 1906, $6,464.

 

John C. Hopkins, south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $440.

 

A. T. Seely Estate, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $440.

 

Nels O. Cassem, south half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $440.

 

August Lippold, south half of lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $440.

 

A. T. Seely Estate, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,190.

 

John J. Gates, south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,090.

 

A. T. Seely Estate, north half lot 3, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,385.

 

John J. Gates, south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,180.

 

Lot 4

 

Street address: 215 South Bridge Street

Legal description:north 29 feet of lot 4, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Equals lot 4, block 1, except the south 22 feet of lot 4, block 1,

Brick building constructed for Charles E. Moore in 1879-80.

 

Moore Drug Store, Charles E. Moore proprietor (1880 - )

Yorkville Post Office, Charles E. Moore Postmaster (June 1881 – August 1885)

Moore & Newton Drug Store, Charles E. Moore and William R. Newton proprietors ( - December 1889)

Moore & Knudson Drug Store, Charles E. Moore and Oscar C. Knudson proprietors (December 1889 – June 1903)

Knudson & Hallock Drug Store, O. C. Knudson & Charles Hallock proprietors (June 1903 - )

Kendall County Bank, a private bank organized by Charles E. Moore & William R. Newton in 1886.)

Newton Brothers Bank, a private bank owned and managed by William R. and Robert N. Newton

Leverich Drug Store, F. A. Leverich proprietor ( - circa 1909)

Yorkville Drug Company, William R. Newton, F. R. Frazier, Mr. Friedberg and F. A. Leverich proprietors (July 1906 - )

Moore Drug Store, Jay E. Moore proprietor (circa 1909 – October 1913)

Leeson Drug Store, E. E. Leeson proprietor (October 1913 – July 1914)

Hunter Drug Store, James C. Hunter proprietor (July 1914 – March 1921)

Bretthauer & Lane Groceries & Dry Goods, Fred Bretthauer & Roy E. Lane proprietors ( - August 1915)

Eugene L. Campbell, law office on second floor (April 1935 - )

Paulsen Appliance Store, Norman Paulsen proprietor

Baird Jewelry Store, Charles E. Baird proprietor

 

The original wood frame building on this site was destroyed by fire in 1876.

 

Charles E. Moore will erect a nice brick store on South Bridge Street, filling the gap between Jesse Bridgens and the Hopkins building.233

 

William R. Newton has sold his interest in the firm of Moore & Newton to Oscar C. Knudson, son of the late Andrew Knudson, and he is now behind the counter. Oscar is a young man of good business qualifications, and will do his best to please patrons of the store. Mr. Newton will retain his interest in the bank.234

 

Jeweler George Ruby who comes well recommended from Aurora has located in Moore & Knudson’s Drug Store. He would like to repair your watches, clocks, jewelry, etc.235

 

Puritan Remedies, which were manufactured by the Yorkville Drug Company, were advertised in the Record. Henry Leifheit was their traveling agent.236

 

There has been a change in the personnel of the Yorkville Drug Company. William R. Newton and F. R. Frazier have withdrawn from the corporation. It is said that Samuel Naden of Newark has purchased their interests in the company. Mr. Leverich and Mr. Friedberg still hold their interests.237

 

E. E. Leeson of Sharon, Wisconsin has bought the drug business of Jay E. Moore and took possession the last of the week. … Mr. Moore has been forced to retire by ill health but does not expect to leave Yorkville….The drug business recently sold was bought from F. A. Leverich some four years ago and has grown steadily under the management of Mr. Moore.238

 

Dr. E. E. Leeson, who bought the Jay E. Moore drug store and who was running it so successfully, has sold out to J. C. Hunter of Chicago, who took possession, Tuesday. Mr. Hunter is an experienced pharmacist and promised well in the store. We are sorry to lose the Leeson family. They were aids in the betterment of the town but are going to Canada where the doctor will farm on the homestead.239

 

Advertisement for James C. Hunter: There is a new man in town; J. C. Hunter has purchased the drug store of Dr. E. E. Leeson at Yorkville and will continue the business at the same location, keeping up the same good standard of drugs, and chemicals, paints and oils that has been maintained in the past.240

 

James C. Hunter has sold his drug store to Carl F. Stark; possession is to be given the first of the week. Mr. Stark is a young man who has been running a drug store in Kankakee although his home was in Joliet. He and his wife will move to Yorkville as soon as convenient. Mr. Hunter has not decided what he will do in the future. He has been in Yorkville for about seven years having bought the business from Dr. E. E. Leeson.241

 

Charles E. Moore, lot 4, block 1 except 22 feet on the south side of lot 4, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $400.

 

Charles E. Moore, lot 4, block 1 except 22 feet on the south side of lot 4, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $440.

 

Street address: 217 South Bridge Street

Legal description: 22 feet on south side of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Brick building built in 1876 for Jesse Bridgens to replace a wood frame structure destroyed by fire in September1876.

Also known as the Hopkins Building

 

Photograph Gallery, Peabody & Weed proprietors from Portland, Maine (May 1870 - )

Jesse Bridgens General Store

McOmber Dry Goods & Grocery (April 1871 – circa 1874)

Photograph Gallery, Merritt C. Pratt, proprietor (April 1871 – was still there August 24, 1871)

Lester Organs, M. Lester, Jr. proprietor (April 1871 - )

Morton & Johnson General Merchandise, Phineas Ashman “Ash” Morton & George M. Johnson proprietors (circa 1874 – summer of 1879)

Fred Bretthauer worked for Morton & Johnson as a clerk from 1875 to 1878.

Johnson General Merchandise, George M. Johnson proprietor (Summer of 1879 - September 1905)

Pedersen & Bretthauer Dry Goods, George M. Pedersen & Fred Bretthauer proprietors (March 1906 – October 1910)

Bretthauer & Lane Dry Goods, Fred Bretthauer & Roy E. Lane proprietors (October 1910 – August 1915)

Lane’s Dry Goods, Roy E. Lane proprietor (1915 - March 1916)

Lane’s Dry Goods, George M. Lane & Fred Bretthauer proprietors (March 1916 -)

Photograph Gallery, Fred G. Winne photographer (November 1880 – May 1882)

Filzen Café (November 1929 – March 1931)

Krim Dry Goods Store, Louis Krim proprietor (March 1931 – March 1943)

 

The original wood frame building Bridgens General Store was in was destroyed by fire in September 1876 when George O. Howard’s Drug Store and the post office in the drug store caught fire and spread to the Bridgens building.

 

Peabody and Weed from Portland, Maine opened photograph rooms over Bridgens & Bonsall’s store.242

 

Merritt C. Pratt and Mr. M. Lester, Jr. moved from Sandwich to Yorkville. Mr. Pratt established a photograph gallery in rooms in the Hopkins’ building.

Mr. Lester established an agency for the sale of Mason & Hamlin Organs in rooms in the Hopkins’ building. 243

 

The new rooms fitted up as a photograph gallery by Mr. Pratt in Hopkins’ building is pleasant and as neat as any we have seen. They are now prepared to take pictures.244

 

McOmber has moved into the fine brick store formerly occupied by Bridgens & Bonsall. The store has been thoroughly refitted, painted, cleaned, and white washed. He is putting up $10,000 worth of goods consisting of everything in the general merchandise line.245

 

Bridgens’ new building has been capped with a handsome sign in scroll work with the inscription “1876 Bridgens’ Store.” It is an ornament to the neat cornice, and is certainly a fine piece of work, being done with a scroll saw.246

 

Jesse Bridgens moved into his new store on Monday, about three months since he vacated the site by reason of fire. He has a handsome store, the shelving and counters are neat, the latter being handsomely grained, and his whole interior is in good taste. Lots of new goods are arriving from Chicago and he will be ready for the holiday trade. Call and see Jesse at the new brick store.247

 

Mr. Morton came to Yorkville some years ago from Maine, and clerked for Mr. Hobbs. Afterward he and George M. Johnson bought out John McOmber, and went into business for themselves. Mr. Morton’s lungs began to trouble him and last year he went to Florida for relief and came back feeling much better. But he felt he must get out of business here and last summer sold his interest in the business to Mr. Johnson.248

 

Fred G. Winne opened a photo gallery over George M. Johnson’s store in November 1880.249

 

Fred G. Winne, our photographer, has decided to stay among us, much to the satisfaction of his many friends. He has leased the rooms over Hobbs store on the corner. He will have the latest improved skylights and the most modern scenery, and will soon be prepared to start up business again. As a photographer, Fred cannot be beat anywhere.

Note: Mr. Winne opened his first photograph gallery over George M. Johnson’s store.250

 

It is reported that the stock of goods in Johnson’s store, which has been traded to a real estate firm for North Dakota land, will be packed up and shipped away, and the dry goods department of the Pederson & Bretthauer firm will move into the Hopkins Building vacated by Mr. Johnson. It will be a fine location and will be a larger and more convenient store room.251

 

The Johnson Store on the west side of Bridge Street has been completely remodeled for its occupancy by the dry goods department of Pedersen & Bretthauer’s stock. It is a well ventilated, sanitary store room. The firm began to move its stock in on Monday.252

 

The Filsen Café has moved this past week from the Wittrup building on the corner to the Gates building recently vacated by the Bretthauer grocery store.253

 

Howard Drug Store, George O. Howard proprietor (Postmaster March 1876 – June 1881) Uncertain of where this store was located.

 

In September 1876 the post office was located in George O. Howard's drug store on the west side of Bridge Street in the central part of downtown Yorkville.

 

Miss Mary Hayes has just received the latest fall styles of millinery goods at her rooms over the post office in Yorkville. She invites the ladies of Kendall County to call and see her stock.

Miss Orrie Gillis may be found in the same rooms to take orders for dressmaking. She has the most fashionable patterns and cannot fail to please the most fastidious. Ladies call and see her.254

 

Fred (Bretthauer) remained at home assisting his father and attending school until he was 16, when he entered the employ of Morton and Johnson as a clerk. He worked there for three years and returned to his father’s farm where he worked for four years. Mr. Bretthauer returned to Yorkville, where he was employed by Mr. Hobbs for twelve years, after which he formed a partnership with George M. Pedersen and opened a business know as Pederson and Bretthauer. In October 1910, Mr. Pedersen sold his interest in the business to Roy E. Lane and the Bretthauer and Lane business came into existence. Mr. Lane conducted one store in which dry goods were handled, and Mr. Bretthauer conducted the grocery line in another store.

In 1915 Mr. Bretthauer retired to enter private life. His son, Harlan W. Bretthauer continued his interests in the business.255

 

 

Street address: 219 South Bridge Street

Legal description: south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Two-story brick building was constructed by Thomas Springer & Thomas N. Morley in 1868.

The building is the first building north of Remmers Shoe Shop, Munson’s Barber Shop, etc.

 

Springer & Morley Dry Goods & Groceries, Thomas Springer & Thomas N. Morley proprietors (November 1868 - )

Morley Merchant Tailor, Thomas C. Morley proprietor (November 1868 - )

Yorkville Post Office (November 1868 – June 1869)

Bridgens & Bonsall Dry Goods & Grocery (Spring 1869 - ))

J. Smith Harness Shop on the second floor (1870)

Charles Weber Grocery

Rasmussen, Pedersen & Bretthauer Grocery & Dry Goods, Julius Rasmussen, George M. Pedersen & Fred Bretthauer proprietors ( )

Pedersen & Bretthauer Dry Goods, George M. Pedersen & Fred Bretthauer proprietors (March 1906 – October 1910)

Bretthauer & Lane Dry Goods. Fred Bretthauer & Roy E. Lane proprietors (October 1910 – August 1915)

Lane Dry Goods, Roy E. Lane proprietor (August 1915 - )

Bretthauer Grocery & Market, Harlan W. Bretthauer proprietor (August 1915 – February 1944)

Bretthauer Grocery & Market, Clarence Bretthauer proprietor (February 1944 - )

 

Springer & Morley increasing trade is crowding them out of their present quarters and they propose to build on the adjoining lot, a two-story brick building 22 by 60 feet, in which they can accommodate their customers to a better advantage.256

 

Springer & Morley have at last taken possession of their splendid new brick store. Everything has been done in modern style. They have gone to great expense to erect this building and furnishing their store. We feel the public will give them a generous patronage.

The post office arrangements are a great improvement over the old arrangement and will a convenience to the public.

Springer & Morley deal in groceries, crockery, glassware, fruit, vegetables, boots, shoes, gloves, hosiery, stationary and notions. They are located in the same store as Mr. Thomas Morley, tailor, who carries a fine stock of cloths and ready made clothing.257

 

Mr. Thomas C. Morley, the Yorkville tailor is doing a large business this fall in his quiet way. He keeps ten or twelve seamstresses at work constantly filling orders for custom work. He has received a large stock of cloths for the winter trade, and a good assortment of ready-made clothing.258

 

In November 1867 Thomas Morley clothier was located on the northwest corner of South Bridge Street and Hydraulic Avenue.259

 

The wood frame building on this site was supposed to have been the sixth building built in downtown Yorkville. In September 1876, the building was destroyed by fire. In 1879-1880, Charles E. Moore erected a brick building on lot 4, between Jesse Bridgens store and the Hopkins building.260

 

Charley Weber has fitted up the building the first door south of the Kendall County Bank for a grocery store. He will carry a complete stock of goods in his line, and respectfully solicits a portion of your trade.261

 

Roy E. Lane, cashier of the Yorkville National Bank, placed his resignation in the hands of the directors of that institution Saturday to take effect on or before October 1. At that time he will take over the interest of George M. Pedersen in the firm Pedersen & Bretthauer. The new firm will be known as Bretthauer & Lane. Mr. Lane will run the dry goods end of the business, as did Mr. Pedersen. Mr. Pedersen has been compelled to get out of the store by reason of his health, and it is thought that he will follow the real estate business.262

 

The Pedersen family will move to Chicago where he has a position in a business house. They left the first of the week for the new location. George M. Pedersen has been a business man in Yorkville for a number of years, having started with Julius Rasmussen in the building now occupied by the Crandall Store. Later Fred Bretthauer was taken into the firm, and after the death of Mr. Rasmussen, these two men carried on the business. Last year Roy E. Lane bought out the Pedersen interest and the latter ran a novelty store.263

 

Fred Bretthauer and Roy E. Lane are to dissolve the firm of Bretthauer & Lane on August 1, 1915. The two stores are to go to Mr. Lane and to Harlan W. Bretthauer. The former will continue in the dry goods business as before, operating one of the best stores in this section. He will be assisted by his brother, George M. Lane, who has been associated with him since the store was started by the firm. Harlan Bretthauer has bought his father our and will continue the grocery business. This young man has made a name as a grocery man during his connection with the business and will have a good trade. His father, who has been active and is well known in the county and town, will retire from active business.264

 

The Bretthauer Grocer & Market opened this morning under the ownership of Clarence Bretthauer who has purchased the business from his brother Harlan. Harlan has operated the store for nearly thirty years and gives up the active management because of his health. 265

 

 

Lot 4: George M. and Julia Hollenback to Washington Thomas, lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 13, 1865, $1,075.

Lot 4: Washington Thomas to Thomas Springer & Thomas N. Morley, 22 feet of the south side of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 14, 1866, $150.

Lot 4: George W. Smith & J. R. Skidmore to Thomas N. Springer & Thomas N. Morley, part lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 3, 1870.

Lot 4: Washington Thomas & wife to Absalom T. Seely, lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 14, 1872, $1,400.

Lot 4: Absalom T. Seely to George R. Lee, part lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 22, 1876, $1,250.

Lot 4: George R. Lee & wife to Charles E. Moore, lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 24, 1879, $500.

Lot 4: Joseph K. Moore to Oliver A. Burkhart, north 20.9 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1921.

Lot 4: Oliver A. Burkhart to Raymond T. Moore, part of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1921.

Lot 4: Adaline Hopkins Swartz to Eugene C. Hopkins, all interest in south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $450.

Lot 4: Eugene C. Hopkins to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, all interest in south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $450.

Lot 4: Adaline Hopkins Swartz to Eugene C. Hopkins, all interest in south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $450.

Lot 4: Eugene C. Hopkins to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, all interest in south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $450.

Lot 4: Mary E. Mason and the executors of the last will and testament of Martha C. Hopkins, deceased to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, an undivided 2/5 interest in lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $1,800.

Lot 4: Estella Clark to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, an undivided 1/5 interest in lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $900.

Lot 4: Emma Hopkins and the executors of the last will and testament of John C. Hopkins, to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, an undivided 1/5 interest in lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $900.

 

Hiram Hopkins, 22 feet of the south side of lot 4, block 1, 1899 T-A, $480.

 

Hiram Hopkins, 22 feet off of the south side of lot 4, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $480.

 

Hiram Hopkins, 22 feet off of the south side of lot 4, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1907 T-A, $480.

 

Hiram Hopkins, 22 feet off of the south side of lot 4, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $800.

 

Charles E. Moore, lot 4 except 22 feet off the south side, block 1, 1899 T-A, $400.

 

Charles E. Moore, lot 4 except 22 feet off the south side, block 1, 1915 T-A, $634.

 

Moore and Son, lot 4 except 22 feet off the south side, and lot 12, block 1, 1931 T-A, $2,500.

 

Lot 5

 

Street address: 221? South Bridge Street.

Legal description: north 25 feet off of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the west side of South Bridge Street, downtown Yorkville.

 

Remmers Shoe Shop, William Remmers proprietor (May 1879 – November 1917)

Larson Barber Shop, Ed. Larson proprietor (November 1917 - )

Yorkville Shoe Repair, Gustave “Edward” Forsell proprietor (March 1923 – May 1939.

Munson Barber Shop, Clair Munson proprietor (1939 - )

 

The Remmers store building is being remodeled and will be occupied by Ed. Larson who will conduct a barber shop there. Mr. Larson has all the late improvements and will run a modern shop.266

 

Gustave “Edward” Forsell assumed the management of William Remmer’s Shoe Store in March 1923. He eventually purchased the shoe store and continued to operate it until his retirement in about 1957. The original building was moved from South Bridge Street to West Van Emmon Street, to make way for the construction of Munson’s Barber Shop.

 

Mr. Munson is building a two-story building to house his barber shop. Bob Smith is in charge of the building operation and will no doubt get lots of advice from time to time as Bob is working in a very exposed place.267

 

William Remmers, north 25 feet off of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $125.

 

William Remmers, north 25 feet off of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $209.

 

Street address: 223 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: south 58 feet of lot 5 and east part of lot 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the northwest corner of South Bridge and West Van Emmon Streets.

Building was also known as the Newton Building, William R. Newton owner.

The frame building built on this lot before 1870 was first operated as a restaurant by Mr. Hartwell.

 

Hartwell Restaurant ( - March 1870)

Holland Hotel, Restaurant & Grocery, Henry A. Holland proprietor (March 1870 -)

Lozier Bakery &Restaurant, Ira Lozier proprietor

Cotton Bakery and Lunch Room, Byron A. Cotton proprietor (May 1879 - August 1887)

McQuiston Millinery and Novelties, Clare McQuiston proprietor (November 1887

Quirk Dressmaking Rooms, Miss Quirk proprietor (before November 1887 - )

Hovey Millinery, Mary Hovey proprietor

Rubenstein Tailor, Joseph Rubenstein proprietor (July 1907 - May 1909)

Knudson Undertaking Rooms & Morgue, Oscar C. Knudson proprietor (August 1909 – May 1919) was moved to the Cotton Building at 301 S. Bridge Street.

Ganes Shoe Shop, A. Ganes proprietor (July 1907 – August 1907)

Pedersen Variety Store, George M. Pedersen proprietor (March 1911 - )

Vail Millinery, Mrs. Edith Vail proprietor (April 1914 - 1915

Yorkville Cafe (A.K.A. Martin Café), Fred H. Martin proprietor (March 1915 - February 1918)

Yorkville Restaurant, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Wittrup proprietors, (February 1918 – March 1924)

Kum On Inn, Joseph F. Filsen proprietor (April 1924 – October 1929)

Newby Peanuts & Popcorn, Mr. Newby proprietor (November 1903 - )

Johnnie’s Barber Shop, Rodney “Johnnie” Kennedy proprietor ( - February 1932)

Capps Barber Shop, Harry Capps proprietor (February 1932 - )

Baldwin Jewelry & Watch Repair, Gordon Baldwin proprietor (February 1932 – February 1934)

Munson Barber Shop, Clair Munson proprietor

Tooley’s Restaurant, Mr. & Mrs. Emerson Tooley proprietors (December 1929 – December 1933)

Wendell Restaurant, William R. Wendell proprietor (January 1934 – April 1937)

Allen Hotel & Restaurant (April 1937 -

Bridgeberry Twigs, Rita Robertson & Debbie Walker proprietors

South Bridge Street Gourmet Coffee, grand opening November 2005.

 

The Holland Hotel was located on the northwest corner of Bridge and Van Emmon Streets, the current site of Bridgeberry Twigs. Owner Henry A. (H. A.) Holland owned a restaurant and grocery store in the hotel building.268 The following announcement was published in March 1870. "Henry A. (H. A.) Holland begs to inform his friends and the public generally that he has removed his business up street to Mrs. Hartwell's old stand where he intends to keep hotel, restaurant and a fancy grocery store. He will supply warm meals three times daily, also good accommodations for the traveling public. He will also keep the following articles in their season. All kinds of green fruits and vegetables, foreign nuts and imported fruits, oranges, lemons, etc. will be stocked. A good stock of fancy and staple groceries will also be carried, as well as Yankee notions of all kinds. Ice cream, lemonade, soda water, and all kinds of summer drinks will be dispensed from the soda fountain. Domestic wine will be available for medicinal use. The celebrated IXL Family bitters, the best in use, will be available for only 75 cents per bottle. These are warranted pure medical bitters, containing no drugs, no poor whiskey. (Note he did not say they contained no whiskey.) He will also keep the best stock of confectionery in the county. Hatterys' Aurora Bread, cakes, pies; etc. will be available three times a week. Luncheons will be served at all times of the day. Terms strictly cash." 269

Mr. Holland has been at considerable expense building an oven with which to do a general baking business. In a day or two, the people of these villages will be able to have fresh bread, buns, cakes and pies delivered to their doors.270

H. A. Holland moved from Yorkville to Des Moines, IA, and others followed in his footsteps. From March 1915 until 1917, Fred Martin was the proprietor. In 1917, S. J. Wittrup bought the hotel and restaurant from Mr. Martin. Mr. Wittrup ran the establishment for seven years before passing away after a long illness. 271 Other landlords ran the hotel and restaurant until Mr. and Mrs. Allen became the proprietors in about 1937. The Allens renamed the place Allen Hotel and Restaurant, and were the final operators of a hotel on that site.

 

Mr. Byron A. Cotton, who has opened a new bakery and restaurant in Yorkville, has his card in the Record this week. We hope the citizens of these villages will give him a good patronage, and help sustain the bakery business in Yorkville. Mr. Cotton’s restaurant is a good place to get warm or cold lunches, or buy confectioneries.272

Comment: There was no shortage of baked goods in Yorkville. Many tried the bakery business in Yorkville. At times there was more than one bakery, they came and they went. In addition, every grocery store sold bread, usually obtaining their bread from out of town bakers, predominantly Aurora bakers. In addition, many housewives baked their own bread during the Cotton era.

 

The bakery and restaurant recently vacated by Ira Lozier, has been opened again this week by a gentleman from Pontiac. (Byron A. Cotton was the gentleman from Pontiac.) H. A. Holland is having an oven built back of his grocery, and will also run a bakery. It will make business in that line lively.273

Comment: During the same time B. A. was running his business, Justus Nading had a bakery and restaurant. Justus' hotel business eventually became dominant and he gave up the bakery but there was he continued to run a restaurant in the hotel.

 

Mr. Cotton, the wide awake restaurant man, opened the ice cream season Monday, and in the future will always have a supply of that delicious article on hand, and he can make first-class cream. He will also keep lemonade, strawberries, and all kinds of fruit in season, and everything else required to make up a first-class restaurant. Mr. Cotton has been very successful since he came to Yorkville, and keeps one of the neatest and cleanest places in town. Drop in and try Cotton's cream.274

 

Mr. B. A. Cotton, of the Yorkville Bakery, has started an enterprise which should be well patronized. He has a coffee roaster and a large mill in his store, and a good stock of green coffee. You can buy the coffee, have it roasted and ground, if you wish, and know what you are getting.275

 

Fresh roasted coffee, crackers, celery, preserved strawberries and blackberries at Cotton's.276

 

Advertisement: Byron A. Cotton's Bakery and Confectionery. Fresh bread, pies, cakes, and buns are always on hand. We also carry a fine assortment of common and fancy Confectionery. Oysters are always on hand. Fine nuts, canned goods, tobacco, and cigars are always kept in stock. Byron A. Cotton.277

 

Buy your oranges and lemons, fresh figs and dates at Cotton’s. Coffee is roasted fresh daily at Cotton's.278

 

Cotton's carries popcorn. Mixed candy is 20 cents a pound at Cotton's. Home-made cream candy, 20 cents per pound at Cotton's Yorkville Bakery. Large assortment of candy toys at Cotton's Yorkville bakery. There is a large and fine stock of canned goods to select from at Cotton's. California grapes are available at Cotton's.

 

Comment: B. A. appeared to advertise and decorate his store appropriately for the season. As Christmas neared he would collect and promote items that generally were not available in the stores found in Yorkville during the period.279

 

Buy your Christmas candy at Cotton's. Have you seen those choice table raisins in fancy boxes at Cotton's? If you wish something extra nice for Christmas, try the French prunes, at Cotton's. A choice stock of candy toys may be found at Cotton's Yorkville Bakery. Mixed and broken candy is only 20 cents per pound. Buy your Christmas celery, cranberries, raisins, figs, nuts, oranges, lemons, grapes, bulk and can oysters at Cottons. Christmas Nuts: Almonds, walnuts, filberts, pecans, Brazils, and peanuts at Cotton's Yorkville Bakery.280

 

Cotton baked and sold a thousand loaves of bread last week.281

Comment: Impressive given the competition.

 

Mr. Cotton had his building handsomely decorated on the 4th (of July) with American flags, shields and mottoes; the front looked very attractive.282

 

Advertisement: B. A. Cotton Baker and Confectioner, Bread, Buns, Pies, Cakes, Canned Goods, Nuts, Fruits, etc., always on hand. Banner above cherubs listed, ice cream, confectionery, and water ices.283

 

Mr. Cotton has set up a lunch counter in his bakery where you can get a lunch and cup of good coffee for a small fee. Call and see him when in Yorkville.284

Comment: Sounds like he was about 100 years ahead of Starbucks. He baked his own goodies and roasted and ground his own coffee.

 

Advertisement: B. A. Cotton, Baker & Confectioner, Dealer in Oysters, Canned Fruits, Groceries, Cigars & Tobacco. Yorkville, Illinois.285

Advertisement: B. A. Cotton, Baker and Confectioner, Fresh Ice Cream Every Day. Cotton’s carries a large stock of canned fruits, groceries, cigars & tobacco.286

 

The building just vacated by Mr. Cotton is undergoing repair. New porches are being added and everything repainted and generally fixed up. Miss McQuistion will soon occupy it with her stock of millinery and novelties.287

 

By the time this paper is circulated, Miss McQuiston will have moved her stock of millinery and fancy goods across the street in the building recently vacated by Mr. Cotton, where she will add to her line of goods and offer the people of Kendall County a superb place for shopping.

The millinery and novelty department will be in the main store room. The room on the south is now used by Miss Quirk for dressmaking purposes. Ladies will find it a most convenient addition to Yorkville’s business attractions. Miss Quirk and assistants will be ready to wait on you at once.288

 

Yorkville now has another business house, which, like the mushroom, sprung up in a day, but if you come into town from the north side you would have to look for it with a telescope. Mr. Newby, the peanut man, has erected an 8 by 10 foot building on South Bridge Street on the millinery corner, where he dispenses hot peanuts, fresh buttered popcorn and other things to eat. It is one of the best corners in town but does not present a very imposing appearance to strangers.289

 

Yorkville has a tailor. Thursday Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rubenstein and little son moved to Yorkville and opened a tailor shop in the W. R. Newton property on the corner of South Bridge and West Van Emmon Streets formerly occupied by Miss Mary Hovey. Mr. Rubenstein is an experienced cutter and fitter, as well as a repair man. He has fitted his place with electric ironers and heaters and opened for business Friday morning. The family occupies the rooms on the second floor of the building, with the tailor shop below.290

 

A. Ganes, the shoemaker who located in the Newton building in Yorkville about a month ago, pulled up stakes and hiked for other parts the first of this week.291

 

Joseph Rubenstein has rented the store at 16 Downer Place, Aurora, next to Pederson & Holslag’s and run a tailor shop where he will do all kinds of tailoring for ladies & gentlemen. He asks all his Yorkville patrons to call and see him at his new place of business. Mr. Rubenstein has been in Yorkville two or three years and has given satisfaction with his work.292

 

The building recently occupied by Joseph Rubenstein is being painted and put in shape for O. C. Knudson, who will use it as undertaking rooms and a morgue. Mr. Knudson expects to have his headquarters there and will be in better shape to handle his business than from the old rooms. Mr. Knudson’s undertaking rooms were in the building between the Yorkville National Bank and the W. C. T. U. reading room before the move to the northwest corner of South Bridge and West Van Emmon Street.293

 

George M. Pedersen has about completed the remodeling of his store building and will start a variety store. In this room numerous articles costing from one to twenty-five cents will be found.294

 

George M. Pedersen has rented the store building that he has run as a variety store to D. Schermer of Chicago. This gentleman will move in some time in September and will start a dry goods store. He will make his come in the rooms over the store. O. C. Knudson will use the ell on the south side of the building as his undertaking rooms.295

 

Mrs. Edith Vail of Chicago has opened a millinery store at the corner of South Bridge and West Van Emmon Streets. She has been located in the downtown section of Chicago with her mother Mrs. Judd, for a number of years and the two will carry on the business her.296

 

Dr. Robert A. McClelland has purchased the corner of South Bridge and West Van Emmon Streets in Yorkville of Penman and Hahnenstein. The building is occupied by Mrs. Edith Vail, the milliner and O. C. Knudson, undertaker. The doctor has not decided what improvement to make as yet.297

 

The building formerly occupied by Mrs. Vail as a millinery store has been rented to Fred Martin of Morris who will open a restaurant and bakery there in the near future. Mr. Martin has been a baker in Morris for a long time, where he has built up a large trade. It is hoped that his patronage in Yorkville will be sufficient to warrant his staying. Mr. McClelland is repairing the building preparatory to the opening. J. U. Hubbard was instrumental in bring this new business to Yorkville.298

 

The building owned by Dr. McClelland is being remodeled for the new bakery and restaurant. It will present an entirely new appearance upon completion. The old front has been ripped out and plate glass windows are being installed. The interior is being overhauled and the entire building placed in first class condition. Mr. Martin is here this morning cleaning up and getting his ovens and range placed.299

 

The Yorkville Café, owned by Mr. Fred Martin of Morris, will be formally opened for business Thursday morning. Mr. Martin invites the people of Yorkville and vicinity to visit the restaurant on that day. There will be a souvenir for each visitor and the management will be glad to show you about the place. The building has been practically rebuilt by Shaw Brothers and, with its new coat of paint, makes an attractive location.300

 

The improvements on the Dr. McClelland building occupied by Martin’s Restaurant are moving ahead rapidly. The basement is being excavated and new walls are being built. Mr. Margin will be able to care for his increased business by a larger and much improved dinning room this winter.301

 

Fred H. Martin has sold his restaurant business in Yorkville to S. J. Wittrup, who took possession the first of the week. Mr. Wittrup has been in this line of business in Chicago for several years and, with his son Henry and family, will keep the restaurant at its present high standard. Mr. Martin has been here several years and has built up a successful business. He will remain with Mr. Wittrup for several weeks, but his future plans have not been decided.302

 

The Yorkville restaurant, owned by S. J. Wittrup, is all dressed up with a new coat of paint and paper. The interior has been thoroughly overhauled. Frank Skinner and son, Fred, have spent a good deal of time and work there and the place is all spick and span. The ice cream parlor, restaurant and rooms of the hotel are all bright and clean. Mr. Wittrup, with the able assistance of his capable wife, has made a prosperous business of the restaurant and his efforts are appreciated by all who patronize him.303

 

Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Wittrup have closed their restaurant and hotel in Yorkville for a few weeks and will take a rest. The shortage of help made it impossible for them to continue the business without their presence. Mrs. Wittrup has been in sad need of a complete rest for several months and her physical condition has ordered her away from the business. Yorkville will suffer by the closing of this valuable business. The hope is expressed that both Mr. and Mrs. Wittrup will return with renewed strength and health.304

 

S. J. Wittrup’s obituary was published in the March 5, 1924 issue of the Kendall County Record.305

 

The Wittrup Restaurant has changed management. Henry J. Wittrup has sold his interest to Joseph F. Filsen, who has been associated with Mr. Wittrup for several months. The restaurant will be known from now on as the Kum On Inn. Mr. Filsen will endeavor to keep up the present reputation of the place for good service and cooking. Improvements will be made from time to time which will add to the comfort of the patrons. A fountain has been added this month and ice cream can be had at any time of the day.306

 

The Filsen Café has moved this past week from the Wittrup building on the corner to the Gates building recently vacated by the Bretthauer grocery store.307

 

Mr. and Mrs. Emmerson Tooley have opened a restaurant in the Wittrup building on the corner. The place has been completely refinished and presents a nice appearance. The outside is orange and black and the inside is finished in gray and white. Mr. and Mrs. Tooley serve regular meals and also all kinds of short orders. For those desiring to stay overnight in the village, rooms may be rented. The Tooley’s specialize in home baked pies and pastries.308

 

Johnnie Kennedy sells out. Harry Capps of McLeansboro has taken over Johnnie’s barber shop and will do the barbering. Mr. Capps’ nephew, Gordon Baldwin will have space to do watch repairing. Both men are married and Mr. Capps has a family which will remain in McLeansboro, where he was a barber for some years before coming here. Mr. Baldwin, a younger man, will drive or ride back and forth to Elgin and Carpentersville until he and his wife are able to find suitable quarters in Yorkville.

The new proprietors of the shop purchased the entire equipment from Rodney Kennedy who has been an exceedingly popular and capable barber in the location for a number of years. The shop is being rented to the occupants by Mrs. Emmerson Tooley for an indefinite period.309

 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Baldwin, formerly of Elgin, Illinois, moved into the west Moore apartment downtown Friday. Mr. Baldwin has been doing business in Yorkville since February 20 in what was formerly Johnnie’s barber shop.

Mr. Baldwin is the proprietor of the barber shop, one portion of which he has converted into a jewelry and watch repairing department. Before coming here he was connected in a skilled capacity with the Elgin National Watch Company and has an education in the manufacture, care and repair of watches and clocks. Daniel Long is the new barber in the shop.310

 

In February 1934, Gordon Baldwin sold his jewelry and watch repair business to Francis H. Hance.311

 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Baldwin will move back to Elgin in the near future so Mr. Baldwin will be near to his work in the watch factory.312

 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Allen of Chicago purchased the Wendell Restaurant from William R. Wendell. The new managers started Monday morning. They are welcomed to Yorkville, where they will make their permanent home.

We hate to see “Bill” leave, but the old order changes.313

 

In 2000, an addition was built directly behind Bridgeberry Twigs. The first and second levels each have 1,400 square feet of floor space. The lower level will be used for two offices. The middle, or ground level, will allow for the expansion of Bridgeberry Twigs. The top level will be used for a 1,200 square foot two-bedroom luxury apartment.314

 

Lot 5: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1865, $2,500.

Lot 5: Washington Thomas, et al, to Jacob P. Black, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 18, 1868, $2,600.

Lot 5: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to William R. Newton, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1899, $1,400.

Lot 5: William R. Newton to William Remmers, north 25 feet off of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1901, $650.

Lot 5: William R. Newton to George M. Pederson, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1911, $2,500.

Lot 5: George M. Pederson to Fred W. Simpson, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1912, $2,500.

Lot 5: Fred W. Simpson to Edwin F. Hahnenstein, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1912.

Lot 5: Perry W. Penman and Edward F. Hahnenstein to Robert A. McClelland, part of lots 5 and 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1914.

Lot 5: Heirs of Robert A. McClelland to Sophus J. Wittrup, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1920, $3,500.

Lot 5: Heirs of Elias A. Black to Sophus J. and Mabel C. Wittrup, lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1920.

Lot 5: Joseph K. Moore to Oliver A. Burkhart, north 20.9 feet of lots 3 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1921.

Lot 5: Sarah Remmers Crist, et al to John L. Remmers, Q.C.D., north 25 feet of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1936.

Lot 5: Mabel C. & Emerson F. Tooley to Edward E. Allen, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 19, 1939.

 

Estate of Jacob P. Black, lots 5 and 6, block 1, 1899 T-A, $350.

 

William Remmers Estate, north 25 feet off of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $400.

 

Mabel C. Wittrup, south 58 feet of lot 5 and east part of lot 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $850.

 

John L. Remmers, north 25 feet off of lot 5, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $840.

 

Lot 6

 

Street address: ? West Van Emmon Street

Legal description: part of lot 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot 6, block 1 of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, faces on West Van Emmon Street, in downtown Yorkville. There is an alley between West Van Emmon Street and Hydraulic Avenue on the west end side of the lot.

 

Kendall Town Hall

Yorkville Shoe Repair, Gustave “Edward” Forsell proprietor (May 1939 - )

 

Lot 6: Elias A. Black & wife to Jacob P. Black, lots 6 and 9, block 1, and part lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1863.

Lot 6: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1865, $2,500.

Lot 6: Washington Thomas, et al, to Jacob P. Black lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 18, 1868, $2,600.

Lot 6: William R. Newton to Town of Kendall, part of lot 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1908, $450.

Lot 6: William R. Newton to George M. Pederson, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1911, $2,500.

Lot 6: George M. Pederson to Fred W. Simpson, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1912, $2,500.

Lot 6: Fred W. Simpson to Edwin F. Hahnenstein, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1912.

Lot 6: Perry W. Penman and Edward F. Hahnenstein to Robert A. McClelland, part of lots 5 and 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1914.

Lot 6: Heirs of Robert A. McClelland to Sophus J. Wittrup, part of lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1920, $3,500.

Lot 6: Mabel C. & Emerson F. Tooley to Edward E. Allen, lots 5 and 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 19, 1939.

Lot 6: Edward E. Allen & Edith May Allen to Clair O. Munson, part of lot 6, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 19, 1939.

 

A major moving job was performed last week when Ed. Forsell’s Shoe store was moved from its place between Allen’s Restaurant and Bretthauer’s Grocery Store to a new location just east of the Town Hall, where Mr. Forsell has an entrance on West Van Emmon instead of South Bridge Street as before.

The former site of the building was purchased by Clair Munson, who sold the building to Mr. Allen. Mr. Munson is planning the construction of a modern brick front two-story building, which when completed will be a great addition to South Bridge Street.

Mr. Forsell will be glad to serve his customers in his new location, while Messrs. Munson and Zeiter (Clair and Ernie) will continue their tonsorial operations in the same place until they move into the new building on its completion.315

 

Ed. Forsell is now comfortable located east of the Kendall Town Hall on West Van Emmon Street. As part of the building program Mr. Forsell’s Shoe Shop was lifted bodily at the old location next to Bretthauer’s Grocery store and without fuss or bother was placed on the new foundation.

Business went on as usual during the move and if electricity were available during the operation, Mr. Forsell would not have lost a moment’s work.316

 

Estate of Jacob P. Black, lots 5 and 6, block 1, 1899 T-A, $350.

 

Mabel C. Wittrup, south 58 feet of lot 5 and east part of lot 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $850.

 

Mabel C. Wittrup Tooley, south 58 feet of lot 5 and east part of lot 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,040.

 

Lot 7

 

Faces on South Main Street between West Hydraulic Avenue and West Van Emmon Street.

 

Lot 7: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to James McKewen, lot 7, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 9, 1864, $150.

Lot 7: McKewen by Elizabeth Carole, et al, to George M. Johnson, lot 7, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 19, 1874, $650.

Lot 7: George Johnson, Administrator, to Elmer W. Johnson, Administrator’s deed, lot 7, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1924.

Lot 7: Elmer W. & Selma Johnson to F. M. Groner, lot 7, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1932.

 

Lot 7: In 1870 a horse and barn was located on lot 7, block 1, on the northeast corner of Van Emon and South Main Streets.

 

George M. Johnson, lot 7, block 1, 1899 T-A, $350.

 

F. M. Groner, lot 7, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $790.

 

F. M. Groner, lot 7, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,580.

 

Lot 8

 

Faces on South Main Street between West Hydraulic Avenue and West Van Emmon Street.

 

Lot 8: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to William H. Clark, lot 8 and part of lot 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 25, 1861, $175.

Lot 8: William H. Clark & wife to Charles R. Wood, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 3, 1864, $950.

Lot 8: Charles R. Wood & wife to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 15, 1873, $800.

Lot 8: Daniel G. Johnson & wife to Charles R. Wood, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 3, 1875, $850.

Lot 8: Mary A. Wood to George M. Pederson, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1895, $1,200.

Lot 8: George M. Pederson, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1912, $1,900.

Lot 8: Fred Bretthauer to Allen H. Van Emon, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1913, $2,400.

 

Lot 8: In 1870 there was a home, on lot 8, block 1, on the northeast corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and South Main Street. From the above records it would appear that the home was built by William H. Clark in about 1865.

“George M. Pederson has been having some repairs done to his residence on West Hydraulic Avenue, and is now having it dressed up with some new paint and trim. Some of the big walnut trees have been felled in the yard, and the whole is a great improvement.”317

 

George Peterson, lot 8, block 1, 1899 T-A, $190.

 

Allen H. VanEmon, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $800.

 

Allen H. VanEmon, lot 8, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,600.

 

Lot 9

 

Street address: lot is off of an alley between West Hydraulic Avenue and West Van Emmon Street.

Legal description: lot 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 9: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to William H. Clark, lot 8 and part of lot 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 25, 1861, $175.

Lot 9: Elias A. Black & wife to Jacob P. Black, lots 6 and 9, block 1, and part lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1863.

Lot 9: Isaac Crooker & wife to Franklin M. Hobbs, undivided half of lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 14, 1873, $2,250.

Lot 9: Franklin M. Hobbs to William Friedberg and George Ohse, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, $6,000.

Lot 9: Rose and Joseph Bymel to Lillian Schwartz, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1932.

Lot 9: Paula Klein and William Sugarman to Lillian Schwartz, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1932.

 

Franklin M. Hobbs, lots 1 and 9, block 1, 1899 T-A, $800.

 

William Friedberg & George Ohse, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,300.

 

William Friedberg & George Ohse, lots 1 and 9, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,444.

 

 

Lot 10

 

Street address: lot is off of an alley between West Hydraulic Avenue and West Van Emmon Street.

Legal description: lot 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 10: Mary Ann Newton, et al, to Samuel A. Hale, I. C. Deed, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 28, 1864, $1.

Lot 10: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Erick Nelson, lot 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1865, $50.

Lot 2: Leopold Lehman to Frederick W. Neidert, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 20, 1866, $1,600.

Lot 10: Frederick W. Neidert & wife to Albert M. Hobbs, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 3, 1867, $200.

Lot 10: Frederick W. Neidert & wife to David Sinclair, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 8, 1868, $2000.

Lot 10: Albert M. Hobbs to Gottfried Haas, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 12, 1871, $500.

Lot 10: Gottfried & Louisa Haas, to John A. Beeman, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 22, 1872, $2,000.

Lot 10: Theresa Haas to Gottfried Haas, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 13, 1872, $1,000.

Lot 10: David Sinclair & wife to Silas G. Dyer, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 20, 1875, $3,000.

Lot 10: Gottfried Haas & wife to Reuben W. Willett, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 6, 1880, $2,500.

Lot 10: Randall Cassem & wife to Thornton Ware, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 27, 1884, $275.

Lot 10: Thornton Ward to Silas Dyer, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 27, 1884.

Lot 10: Clement J. & Arthur Dyer & wives to Silas Dyer, north half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 25, 1884, $100.

Lot 10: Susan C. Dial & husband to Silas Dyer, north half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 13, 1885, $350.

Lot 10: Fred Ohse to Henry C. McElvaine, lot 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1891, $80.

Lot 10: Jacksonville Bank to Nels O. Cassem, south half of lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1902, $2,600.

Lot 10: Heirs of Nels O. Cassem to August Lippold, south half of lots 2 and 3, and lots 10 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and lots 2, 3 and 4 block 4; and lots 2 and 7, block 10, Hopkins’ Addition to Yorkville, January 1906, $6,464.

Lot 10: August Lippold to Charles Hardekopf, lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1910, $3,200.

 

John Reddock, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

Reuben W. Willett, south half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

John Reddock, north half lot 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1903 T-A, $20.

 

John Reddock, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $800.

 

Fred Wright, south half lots 2 and 10, and north half of block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,300.

 

John Reddock, north half lots 2 and 10, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,040.

 

Fred Wright, south half lots 2 and 10 and north half of lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,200.

 

Lot 11

 

Street address: lot is off of an alley between West Hydraulic Avenue and West Van Emmon Street.

Legal description: lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 11: Formerly lot 8: There were two lots assigned the number 8 so one was changed to lot 11. Lot 11 is directly west of lot 3.

Lot 11: Washington Thomas to Jacob P. Black, lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 29, 1864, $500. Previously lot 8, however there were two lot 8’s in block 1. This lot backs up to an alley.

Lot 11: Jacob P. Black & wife to Adolph Stolp, south half of lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1, 1872, $450.

Lot 11: Adolph Stolp & wife to Jesse H. Bridgens, south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 21, 1874, $1,000.

Lot 11: Jesse Bridgens & wife to Eliza A. Green, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1878, $2,000.

Lot 11: Eliza A. Green to Catherine J. Bridgens (Mrs. Jesse), south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 21, 1878, $2,000.

Lot 11: Jesse H. Bridgens, et al, to Edward C. and Percy W. Bridgens, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892, $1,600.

Lot 11: Edward C. and Percy W. Bridgens to Nels O. Cassem, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892, $2,750.

Lot 11: Percy W. Bridgens to Edward C. Bridgens, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1895, $250.

Lot 11: Edward C. Bridgens to John C. Hopkins, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1895, $3,000.

Lot 11: Master in Chancery to Nels O. Cassem, south half of lot 3 and lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1899, $3,287.35

Lot 11: Heirs of Nels O. Cassem to August Lippold, south half of lots 2 and 3, and lots 10 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and lots 2, 3 and 4 block 4; and lots 2 and 7, block 10, Hopkins’ Addition to Yorkville, January 1906, $6,464.

Lot 11: John J. Gates and wife, Isabelle E. Gates to Fred L. Wright, north part of (1/2?) lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1925, $300.

 

John C. Hopkins, lot 11, block 1, 1899 T-A, $36.

 

Fred Wright, north half lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $100.

 

John J. Gates south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,090.

 

John J. Gates, south half lots 3 and 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,100.

 

Fred Wright, south half lots 2 and 10 and north half of lot 11, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,200.

 

Lot 12

 

Street address: lot is off of an alley between West Hydraulic Avenue and West Van Emmon Street.

Legal description: lot 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 12: Formerly lot 7: There were lots assigned the number 7 so one was changed to lot 12. Lot 12 is directly west of lot 4.

Lot 12: Elias A. & Jacob P. Black & wives to George M Hollenback, lot 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1863.

Lot 12: George M. and Julia Hollenback to Washington Thomas, lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 13, 1865, $1,075.

Lot 12: Washington Thomas to Thomas Springer & Thomas N. Morley, 22 feet of the south side of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 14, 1866, $150. Previously lot 7, however there were two number 7 lots in block 1. This lot backs up to an alley.

Lot 12: George W. Smith & J. R. Skidmore to Thomas N. Springer & Thomas N. Morley, part lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 3, 1870.

Lot 12: Washington Thomas & wife to Absalom T. Seely, lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 14, 1872, $1,400.

Lot 12: Absalom T. Seely to George R. Lee, part lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 22, 1876, $1,250.

Lot 12: Oliver A. Burkhart to Raymond T. Moore, part of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1921.

Lot 12: Adaline Hopkins Swartz to Eugene C. Hopkins, all interest in south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $450.

Lot 12: Eugene C. Hopkins to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, all interest in south 22 feet of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $450.

Lot 12: Mary E. Mason and the executors of the last will and testament of Martha C. Hopkins, deceased to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, an undivided 2/5 interest in lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $1,800.

Lot 12: Estella Clark to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, an undivided 1/5 interest in lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $900.

Lot 12: Emma Hopkins and the executors of the last will and testament of John C. Hopkins, to Alfred H. Moore and Fred G. Moore, an undivided 1/5 interest in lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1922, $900.

Lot 12: Kendall County Loan and Abstract Company to Village of Yorkville, west 50 feet of the north 20.9 feet of lot 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1923, $200.

Site of Yorkville water well.

 

Hiram Hopkins, 22 feet on south side of lot 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

Moore & Son, 22 feet on south side of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,200.

 

Charles E. Moore, lot 12, except 22 feet on the south side of lot 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

Abstract Company, lots 4 and 12, except 22 feet on the south side of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,000.

 

Moore and Son, 22 feet of the south side of lot 4, and lot 12, block 1, 1931 T-A, $2,500.

 

Abstract Company, lots 4 and 12, except 22 feet on the south side of lots 4 and 12, block 1, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,400.

 

 

Block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Downtown Yorkville

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 201 South Main Street.

Legal address: lot 1 (except westerly 6.36 feet and southerly 31.2 feet), block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Original house built circa 1862.

Southwest corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and South Main Street.

 

Lot 1: Jacob P. Black & Elias A. Black & wives to Caroline Harder (Mrs. John T.), Lot 1 and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 25, 1861, $125.

Lot 1: John T. Harder & wife Caroline to Myron Hopkins, lot 1 and east half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 25, 1864, $1,200.

Lot 1: Myron Hopkins & wife to George E. Ackerman, lot 1 and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 2, 1890, $ 1,100.

Lot 1: George E. Ackerman to Charles Lovell, lot 1, and south half of lot 4 (sic east half of lot 4), block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1907, $1,000.

Lot 1: Fred Porport to John “Edward” Price, lot 1 and part of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1910, $1,200.

Lot 1: J. E. (John “Edward”) Price to John Wampah, lot 1, and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1919, $3,000.

 

Lot 1: In 1870 there was house on the lot. The above records indicate that the house was built by John T. and Caroline Harder, circa 1862.

 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wampah expect to move back to their farm, Pleasant View, in Kendall Township. Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Leach will occupy the Wampah home in town.318

 

The house owned by John Wampah and occupied by Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Leach is being given a new coat of paint.319

 

It comes through the grapevine that Oscar Friedberg and his family will soon move to the home now occupied by (F. A.) Al Leach and family on Hydraulic Avenue. Mr. and Mrs. Leach with their little daughter will take the home to be completed for them by Earl Kahle.320

 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Friedberg and family moved into the Wampah house vacated by the F. A. Leach family on Thursday.

 

The Yorkville City Council this week approved a development agreement and rezoning to B2 for an empty lot at 201 South Main Street and a house at 204 Hydraulic Avenue. Robert and Debra Dearborn plan to build a two story building (picture above) on the property which is across the street from the present Yorkville Post Office. As proposed, the building would have business uses on the first floor and apartments on the second floor.321

 

George E. Ackerman, lot 1, block 2, 1899 T-A, $260

 

John Wampah, lot 1 and east half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,050.

 

John Wampah, lot 1 and east half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,100.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 204 West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: westerly 6.36 feet and southerly 31.2 feet of lot 1 and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Original house constructed between November 1862 and November 1864.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Mary Tyler, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 25, 1861, $125.

Lot 2: R. B. Tyler to William H. Clark, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 10, 1862, $550.

Lot 2: William H. Clark & wife to John L. Lyon, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 26, 1864, $850.

Lot 2: John L. Lyon to Andrew P. Dixon, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 15, 1866, $1,000.

Lot 2: Andrew P. Dixon & wife to Cyrus B. Ingham, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 15, 1872, $1,600.

Lot 2: Cyrus B. Ingham to Hannah E. Dixon, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 28, 1872.

Lot 2: William G. Billings, by Sheriff to John C. Eldridge & Andrew P. Dixon, Court Sale, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 31, 1872, $343.68.

Lot 2: Andrew Dixon by Sheriff Newton, to William G. Billings, Sheriff’s deed, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1, 1874, $308.96.

Lot 2: William G. Billings & wife to Phineas A. Morton, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, Sheriff’s Warranty deed, May 16, 1874, $700.

Lot 2: Andrew P. Dixon to Phineas A. Morton, lot 2, and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 21, 1874, $200.

Lot 2: Phineas A. Morton & wife to Samuel D. Humiston, lot 2, and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 16, 1879, $800.

Lot 2: Samuel D. Humiston & wife to Elizabeth L. Healy, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 3, 1886, $1,100.

Lot 2: Elizabeth L. Healy & husband (William Henry, Jr.) to Flora E. Weaver, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1891, $2,350.

Lot 2: Jane Inscho to William Inscho, lot 2 and east half lot 3 block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 11, 1891, $500.

Lot 2: Flora E. Weaver to Henry J. Collman, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1897, $2,400.

Lot 2: Henry J. Collman to Adelpha G. Ohse (Mrs. George Ohse), lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1904, $2,450.

 

Lot 2: In 1870 there was a house on northwest corner of Van Emmon and South Main Street. From the foregoing records it would appear that the house was built by William H. Clark between November 1862 and November 1864.

 

Lot 2: In the summer of 1886, Elizabeth L. (Palmer) Healy and her husband, William Henry Healy, Jr. purchased Samuel D. Humiston’s home on lot 2 and the east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. In the summer of 1887, the house was remodeled and an addition added.322

 

The Henry Collman place in Yorkville has been sold to Mrs. George Ohse, and it will make a convenient home for the family.”323

 

The Yorkville City Council this week approved a development agreement and rezoning to B2 for an empty lot at 201 South Main Street and a house at 204 Hydraulic Avenue. Robert and Debra Dearborn plan to build a two story building (picture above) on the property which is across the street from the present Yorkville Post Office. As proposed, the building would have business uses on the first floor and apartments on the second floor.324

 

Henry Collman, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, 1899 T-A, $360.

 

George Ohse, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,150.

 

George Ohse, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,300.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: 207 West Van Emmon.

Legal description: lots 3-1 and 4-3 (sic 4-2?), block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

House constructed circa 1875-1876. The house was remodeled and an addition added in the summer of 1887.

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Mary Tyler, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 25, 1861, $125.

Lot 3: R. B. Tyler to William H. Clark, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 10, 1862, $550.

Lot 3: Andrew P. Dixon & wife to Cyrus B. Ingham, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 15, 1872, $1,600.

Lot 3: Cyrus B. Ingham to Hannah E. Dixon, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 28, 1872.

Lot 3: William G. Billings, by Sheriff to John C. Eldridge & Andrew P. Dixon, Court Sale, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 31, 1872, $343.68.

Lot 3: Andrew Dixon by Sheriff Newton, to William G. Billings, Sheriff’s deed, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1, 1874, $308.96.

Lot 3: William G. Billings & wife to Phineas A. Morton, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, Sheriff’s Warranty deed, May 16, 1874, $700.

Lot 3: William H. Clark & wife to John L. Lyon, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 26, 1864, $850.

Lot 3: Alvah Beecher to Levi Dunbar, west half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 12, 1866, $700.

Lot 3: John L. Lyon to Andrew P. Dixon, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 15, 1866, $1,000.

Lot 3: Andrew P. Dixon by Sheriff Newton, to William G. Billings, Sheriff’s deed, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1, 1874, $308.96.

Lot 3: William G. Billings & wife to Phineas A. Morton, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, Sheriff’s Warranty deed, May 16, 1874, $700.

Lot 3: Andrew P. Dixon to Phineas A. Morton, lot 2, and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 21, 1874, $200.

Lot 3: Phineas A. Morton & wife to Samuel D. Humiston, lot 2, and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 16, 1879, $800.

Lot 3: Emma Dunbar to Maria Bowne, west half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1, 1884, $150.

Lot 3: Samuel D. Humiston & wife to Elizabeth L. Healy, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 3, 1886, $1,100.

Lot 3: Elizabeth L. Healy & husband (William Henry, Jr.) to Flora E. Weaver, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1891, $2,350.

Lot 3: Jane Inscho to William Inscho, lot 2 and east half lot 3 block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 11, 1891, $500.

Lot 3: Flora E. Weaver to Henry J. Collman, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1897, $2,400.

Lot 3: Henry J. Collman to Adelpha G. Ohse, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1904, $2,450.

Lot 3: William H. Bowne to Sarah M. Delancy, west half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1906, $350.

Lot 3: Sarah Marie Delancy to Eliza F. Budd, west half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1920.

 

Lot 3: Vacant lot in 1870. In the summer of 1886, Elizabeth L. (Palmer) Healy and her husband, William Henry Healy, Jr. purchased Samuel D. Humiston’s home on lot 2 and the east half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. In the summer of 1887, the house was remodeled and an addition added. In March 1898 Elizabeth Bowne was living in a house on the west half of lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville,”325

 

Henry Collman, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 2, 1899 T-A, $360.

 

Elizabeth Brown, west half of lot 3, block 2, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

George Ohse, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,150.

 

George Ohse, lot 2 and east half lot 3, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,300.

 

Eliza F. Budd, west half lot 3 and south 40 feet of the west half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $940.

 

Eliza F. Budd, west half lot 3 and south 40 feet of the west half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,780.

 

Eliza F. Budd, west half lot 3 and south 40 feet of the west half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1936 T-A, $1,080.

 

Lot 4

 

Street address: 208 West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: lot 4-1, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. Is the east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Original house constructed circa 1862-1863.

 

Mrs. Wampah and her mover moved into their new home on West Hydraulic Avenue, Tuesday.326

 

Mr. & Mrs. Chester and Margaret (Bieritz) Lindholm are keeping house in the new Wampah bungalow on Hydraulic Avenue.327

 

Lot 4: Jacob P. Black & Elias A. Black & wives to Caroline Harder, Lot 1 and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 25, 1861, $125.

Lot 4: John T. Harder & wife to Myron Hopkins, lot 1 and east half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 25, 1864, $1,200.

Lot 4: Alvah Beecher to William A. Puderbaugh, west half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 12, 1866, $400.

Lot 4: Myron Hopkins & wife to George E. Ackerman, lot 1 and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 2, 1890, $ 1,100.

Lot 4: George E. Ackerman to Charles Lovell, lot 1, and south half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1907, $1,000.

Lot 4: Fred Porport to John “Edward” Price, lot 1 and part of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1910, $1,200.

Lot 4: J. E. (John “Edward”) Price to John Wampah, lot 1, and east half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1919, $3,000.

Lot 4: Maude P. Vaughan to Earl C. Puderbaugh, undivided half interest in west half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1920.

Lot 4: Earl C. Puderbaugh to Eliza F. Delancy, west half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1920, $400.

Lot 4: Eliza F. Delancy to Clarence S. Williams, half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, except south 40 feet, February 1920, $400.

Lot 4: Clarence S. Williams to Irma Trish, west half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, except south 40 feet, April 1920, $500.

Lot 4: Irma Trish Sheridan to George H. Arundale, west half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, except south 40 feet, December 1921, $800.

Lot 4: George H. Arundale, widower, to Daisy Slayton Clarke, west half of lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, except south 40 feet, September 1930.

 

Lot 4: In 1870, two buildings are depicted on lot 4, block 2, on the southeast corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and South State Street.

 

George E. Ackerman, east half lot 4, block 2, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

William Puderbaugh, west half lot 4, block 2, 1899 T-A, $160. Street address: 208 West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

John Wampah, lot 1 and east half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,050. Street address: 204 West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Eliza F. Budd, west half lot 3 and south 40 feet of the west half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $940. Street address: 207 West Van Emmon Street.

 

Daisy S. Clarke, west half lot 4, except south 40 feet, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $280. Street address: 208 West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

John Wampah, lot 1 and east half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,100. Street address: 204 West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Eliza F. Budd, west half lot 3 and south 40 feet of the west half lot 4, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,780. Street address: 207 West Van Emmon Street.

 

Daisy S. Clark, west half lot 4, except south 40 feet, block 2, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $560. Street address: 208 West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 201 South State Street.

Legal description: lot 1-1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Street address: 203 South State Street.

Legal description: lot 1-2, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 1: E. A. Black & wife to Jacob P. Black, lot 1, block 1 and lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1858, $100.

Lot 1: Jacob P. Black & wife to Levi H. Dunbar, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 4, 1870, $500.

Lot 1: Estate of Emma Dunbar, by executor to Robert Dunbar, executor, executor’s deed to lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1936, $720.

Lot 1: Robert & Frieda Dunbar to Tessa Dunbar, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1936.

Lot 1: Tessa Dunbar to Clifford F. & Luella U. Naden, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 29, 1940.

Lot 1: Clifford F. & Luella U. Naden to Lawrence W. & Carolyn O. Leifheit, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 29, 1940.

 

 

Lot 1: In 1870 there a house was on lot 1, block 3, the southwest corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and South State Street.

 

Emma Dunbar, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $130.

 

Emma Dunbar, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $300.

 

Emma Dunbar, lot 1, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $600.

 

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 207 South State Street.

Legal description: lot 2, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. Black, et al, to William M. Lawrence, lot 2, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 26, 1865, $350.

Lot 2: William M. & Althea Lawrence to Samuel M. Inscho, lot 2, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 13, 1872, $675.

Lot 2: Samuel Inscho, Administrator to George W. Ernst, lots 2 and 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, Administrator’s deed, August 1, 1879, $600.

Lot 2: George W, Ernst to Samuel Inscho, lots 2 and 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 22, 1879, $600.

Lot 2: Jane Inscho to William Inscho, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1891, $500.

Lot 2: William Inscho to Henry F. Schreul, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $500.

Lot 2: Henry F. Schreul to James Harkness, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1906, $1,000.

Lot 2: James Harkness by Executor’s deed, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1925, $1,800.

Lot 2: William D. & Beulah (Dickson) Alcott to William M. Willett, part of lots 2 and 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1940.

 

Lot 2: In 1870 there was a house on lot 2, block 3, on the northwest corner of West Van Emon and South State Streets.

“Henry Schreul has moved his family into the place known as the old Inscho house on the west end of Van Emon Street, on the south side. He recently bought the place and had it repaired and remodeled, and now has a comfortable dwelling.”328

 

William Inscho, lot 2, block 3, 1899 T-A, $75.

 

Mrs. Nannie B. Thurber, lot 2, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $460.

 

Mrs. Nannie B. Thurber, lot 2, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $900.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: 307 West Van Emmon Road.

Legal description: lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Samuel Inscho, lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 9, 1872, $250.

Lot 3: Samuel Inscho & wife to Charity Evans, west half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 14, 1873.

Lot 3: Charity A. Evans to John Cooper, west half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 7, 1878, $450.

Lot 3: Samuel Inscho, Administrator to George W. Ernst, lots 2 and 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, Administrator’s deed, August 1, 1879, $600.

Lot 3: George W, Ernst to Samuel Inscho, lots 2 and 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 22, 1879, $600.

Lot 3: John Cooper & wife to Maggie Hume, west half lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 21, 1882, $500.

Lot 3: Jane Inscho to William Inscho, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1891, $500.

Lot 3: Maggie Hume to Joseph Emerson, west half of lot 3, block 3 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 7, 1904, $425.

Lot 3: Joseph Emerson to Joseph Atkins, west half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 12, 1904, $400.

Lot 3: William Inscho to Henry Schreul, lot 2 and east half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $500.

Lot 3: Henry F. Schreul to James Harkness, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1906, $1,000.

Lot 3: Joseph Atkins to Alice Mabel Gunderson, west half lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914, $600.

Lot 3: Alice Mabel Gunderson to Lilly T. Wesche, west half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1914, $650.

Lot 3: Estate of Lilly T. Wesche, half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1921, $335.

Lot 3: James Harkness by Executor’s deed, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1925, $1,800.

Lot 3: Nannie B. Thurber to John Hart, east half of lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1925, $100.

Lot 3: William D. & Beulah (Dickson) Alcott to William M. Willett, part of lots 2 and 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1940.

 

Margaret Linn, lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $75.

 

John Hart, lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $290.

 

John Hart, lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $600.

 

Lot 3: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Lot 4

 

Street address: 308 West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Southeast corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and Adams Street.

 

Lot 4: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Henry Weber & wife, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 14, 1864, $125.

Lot 4: Washington Thomas to Elizabeth Metcalf, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 29, 1866, $500.

Lot 4: Henry Weber & wife to Washington Thomas, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 27, 1867, $325.

Lot 4: Elizabeth Metcalf to Thomas P. Metcalf, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 6, 1871.

Lot 4: Elizabeth E. Souders, et al, to Abigail Spencer, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 26, 1881, $450.

Lot 4: Carrie Van Epps to Abigail Spencer, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 24, 1887, $50.

Lot 4: Abigail Spencer to Randall Cassem, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 13, 1887, $700.

Lot 4: Randall Cassem to Squire Manley, et al, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1904, $600.

Lot 4: Squire Manley to Flora B. Manley, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1921.

Lot 4: Flora B. Manley to Elmer P. Richards, et al, part lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1927.

Lot 4: Gilbert L. Richards to Elmer P. Richards part of lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1929.

 

Squire Manley, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $66.

 

Flora Manley, lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $300.

 

Flora Manley, east part of lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $560.

 

Elmer P. Richards, west part of lot 4, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $360.

 

Lot 4: In 1870 there was a house on lot 4, block 3.

 

Block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 205 Adams Street.

Legal description: lot 1-2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

 

Lot 4: Elias A. & Jacob P. Black & wives to Julia A. Hollenback, lot 1, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 25, 1861, $80.

Lot 1: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Wellington Mason, lot 1, block 4, and east half of lot 2, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 5, 1870, $250.

Lot 1: Wellington Mason to Curtis Mason, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1893, $775.

Lot 1: Curtis Mason to Lawrence Linn, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, July 1895, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, $700.

Lot 1: Douglas Kennedy to Justus Nading, part of lot 1, block 4, Black’s First Addition, June 1898, $1,000.

Lot 1: Clara A. Haage to Minnie Porport, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $1,200.

Lot 1: Minnie Porport to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1908, $2,500.

Lot 1: William R. Newton to Severt O. Hagen, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4; except north 27 feet of lot 1 and 27 feet of part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1915, $1,000.

Lot 1: Oscar S. Hagen to Electa Hagen, east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, with exception, also part of lot 1, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1930.

Lot 1: Electa and Oscar S. Hagen to Isaiah O. Hagen, et al, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1931.

 

The final papers were drawn last week which deeds to the Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville the pretty home property of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Porport, on the west end of town, for a consideration of $2,500. The Burlington has had an engineer here who surveyed the ground for a switch track to run alongside the elevator which the farmers propose to erect on the premises, the whole being the outcome of the cooperative scheme which has been agitated in this vicinity for several months.

Everything has been finally completed toward the incorporation of the organization, and the charter, by-laws, etc., have been received.

It is planned to hold a big meeting in the town hall in Yorkville next Saturday in an endeavor to enlist more enthusiasm and assistance in the movement.329

 

Lawrence Linn, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

Severt O. Hagen Estate, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $480.

 

Severt O. Hagen Estate, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $950.

 

Lot 1: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 207 Adams Street.

Legal description: lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to George Middlemus, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 7, 1866, $125.

Lot 2: George Middlemus to Jacob P. Black, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1867, $700.

Lot 2: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to F. F. Haage, lots 2 and 4, block 4, except driveways, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1902, $375.

Lot 2: F. F. Haage to Charles Manley, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1903, $200.

Lot 2: Charles Manley to Bertha Manley, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1911.

Lot 2: Mrs. Bertha Parsons to Sarah T. Larson, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1915, $650.

Lot 2: Louie M. Larson & wife to Ole Nelson, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 17, 1937

 

Lot 2: In 1870 there was a house on lot 2, block 4, on the northwest corner of Van Emon and Adams Streets. Charles Manley purchased this home from F. F. Haage in 1903.

“The Porport property consists of all of block 4 in Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, except lot 2 on the southeast corner of the block, which is the northwest corner of VanEmon and Adams Streets. Lot 2 is owned by Charles Manley. There are about 2½ acres of land in the piece, bordering the railroad on the north and faced by Adams Street on the west. If the elevator is built in this location it is proposed to use the house and part of the premises for the residence of a local manager, as it is a large and comfortable house.”330

“Mrs. Fred Porport, who sold her home place to the Farmers’ Elevator Company, has bought the former Ackerman property at the foot of South Main Street, now occupied by Charles G. Johnson. Mr. Johnson will move into the Harkness house, formerly owned by Ray Stroud.”331

 

Lot 2: Mr. and Mrs. Irving Bessette moved Monday from the brick house on West Hydraulic Avenue to the Henry Chappell home.332

 

Lot 2: Mr. and Mrs. Carl Neusus have moved into the house on West Van Emmon Street owned by Mrs. Sarah Larson.333

 

Estate Jacob P. Black, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $125.

 

Sarah Larson, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $340.

 

Sarah Larson, lot 2, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $680.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: West Van Emmon Street.

Legal description:

 

Lot 3: Heirs of Elias A. Black to F. F. Haage, undivided one-half interest in lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1902, $150.

Lot 3: Adele M. Kremer to F. F. Haage, undivided one-half of lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $150.

Lot 3: F. F. Haage to Alfred L. Proctor, lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1903, $200.

Lot 3: Alfred L. Proctor to Clara A. Haage, lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $200.

Lot 3: Clara A. Haage to Minnie Porport, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $1,200.

Lot 3: Minnie Porport to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1908, $2,500.

 

Jacob P. and Elias A. Black, lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $30.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,500.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,000

 

Lot 3: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Lot 4

 

Street address: West Hydraulic Avenue

 

Lot 4: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 7, 1868, $100.

Lot 4: Washington Thomas & wife to Linus F. Hall, lots 4 and 5, block 4; and blocks 10 and 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 18, 1870, $2,000.

Lot 4: Linus F. Hall & wife to Wellington Mason, lots 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 17, 1872, $440.

Lot 4: Wellington Mason to Curtis Mason, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1893, $775.

Lot 4: Curtis Mason to Lawrence Linn, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1895, $700.

Lot 4: Clara A. Haage to Minnie Porport, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $1,200.

Lot 4: Minnie Porport to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1908, $2,500.

Lot 4: William R. Newton to Severt O. Hagen, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, except north 27 feet of lot 1 and 27 feet of part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1915, $1,000.

Lot 4: Electa and Oscar S. Hagen to Isaiah O. Hagen, et al, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1931.

 

Lawrence Linn, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

Severt O. Hagen Estate, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $480.

 

Farmers Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,500.

 

Severt O. Hagen Estate, lot 1 and east 20 feet of lot 4, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $950.

 

Farmers Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,000

 

Lot 4: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Lot 5

 

Street address:

Legal description:

Lot is on the southeast corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and Morgan Street.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Company, organized in 1909

 

Lot 5: Elias A. Black & wife to Jacob P. Black, lot 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, & lot 1, block 5, Yorkville, January 3, 1861, $253.50.

Lot 5: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lot 5, block 4, and block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 27, 1864, $150.

Lot 5: Elisha Taylor & wife to George W. Gunver?, lot 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 28, 1864, $137.50.

Lot 5: Patrick Egan to John F. McMahon, lot 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 14, 1865, $125.

Lot 5: John F. McMahon to Washington Thomas, lot 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 24, 1866, $100.

Lot 5: Linus F. Hall & wife to Wellington Mason, lots 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 17, 1872, $440.

Lot 5: Washington Thomas & wife to Linus F. Hall, lots 4 and 5, block 4; and blocks 10 and 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 18, 1870, $2,000.

Lot 5: Wellington Mason to Curtis Mason, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1893, $775.

Lot 5: Curtis Mason to Lawrence Linn, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1895, $700.

Lot 5: Clara A. Haage to Minnie Porport, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $1,200.

Lot 5: Minnie Porport to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1908, $2,500.

 

The Farmers’ Elevator Company let the contract, Saturday, to Theodore Austin of Sheridan, Illinois for the erection of a 20,000 bushel elevator. The building is to be completed within six weeks. The Burlington is to put in the tracks for a switch in the near future and the company will be ready for business.334

 

Lawrence Linn, lots 1, 4 and 5, block 4, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

Farmers Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,500.

 

Farmers Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,000

 

Lot 5: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Lot 6

 

Northeast corner of West Van Emmon and Morgan Streets.

 

Lot 6: Heirs of Elias A. Black to F. F. Haage, undivided one-half interest in lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1902, $150.

Lot 6: Adele M. Kremer to F. F. Haage, undivided one-half of lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $150.

Lot 6: F. F. Haage to Alfred L. Proctor, lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1903, $200.

Lot 6: Alfred L. Proctor to Clara A. Haage, lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $200.

Lot 6: Clara A. Haage to Minnie Porport, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1904, $1,200.

Lot 6: Minnie Porport to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, lots 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1908, $2,500.

 

Jacob P. and Elias A. Black, lots 3 and 6, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $30.

 

Farmers Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,500.

 

Farmers Elevator Co., all of lots 3, 5, 6, and part of lot 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,000

 

Lot 6: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 102 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: 35 by 100 feet north of Starr, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, owned by William Puderbaugh in 1899.

Lot is between East Hydraulic Avenue and the river, on the east side of South Bridge Street.

There were five buildings on the east side of South Bridge Street between the Fox River and East Hydraulic Avenue when this section was initially built out. Beginning at the river, the first building was William Puderbaugh’s Shoe Shop.

 

William Puderbaugh Shoe Shop (Sanborn 1892)

Millinery Variety (Sanborn 1892)

General Store (Sanborn 1898)

Bakery, Joseph Safranek proprietor (March 1927 - )

U.S.D.A. Offices

Yorkville Public Library

 

From an advertisement by William A. Puderbaugh: W. A. Puderbaugh the celebrated boot and shoeist, Yorkville, Illinois. Custom work always on hand and made to order, repairs made with neatness and dispatch using the best material in the world.335

 

Captain A. M. Hobbs has sold the building occupied by Puderbaugh to him and it is being moved on the lot just north of Graham’s Blacksmith Shop.336

 

Puderbaugh’s business has increased so much since he moved on the river bank that he has employed another workman.337

 

By 1892 a large addition had been added on the south side of Puderbaugh’s original shoe shop. See Sanborn map.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Safranek and child moved into the east flat over Moore Market. Mr. Safranek is in charge of the new bakery in the building next to the bridge, recently vacated by the Fred Ohse Grocery.338

 

A truckload of four automobiles heads for the river taking part of some buildings along with them. … The Ohse store was fortunate in only having the corner molding torn off. The Puderbaugh building, which is vacant, had the entire front gouged out. The roof overhangs the wreckage like the visor of a cap…..339

 

Street address: 104 South Bridge Street

Legal description: 23 by 100 feet north of preceding description, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, owned by George G, Starr in 1899.

The second building was an ice house to support the meat market in the third building from the river.

 

Ice House

Royal Blue Grocery Store, Fred Ohse proprietor (November 1926 – January 1948)

Royal Blue Grocery Store, Irvin Monkamier proprietor (January 1948 – February 1948)

Royal Blue Grocery Store, Clinton Heap proprietor (February 1948 - )

U.S.D.A. Offices

Yorkville Public Library

 

Fred Ohse has moved to his new store, which was recently occupied by the bakery. He has a clean, light, store room.340

 

 

Street address: 106 South Bridge Street

Legal description: 27 by 100 feet north of Cooper, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, owned by George G. Starr in 1899.

 

Dolph Meat Market, Orson Dolph proprietor ( - January 1882)

Churchill Meat Market, George Churchill proprietor (January 1882 - )

Moore & Dolph Meat Market, ( - December 1887)

Starr Meat Market, George G. Starr proprietor (December 1887 - )

Starr & Belden Meat Market ( - December 1903)

Knapp Meat Market, Rudolph Knapp proprietor ( - August 1911)

Ringer & Smith Meat Market, Jacob C. Ringer and Harry O. Smith proprietors (August 1911 – February 1912)

Smith & Smith Meat Market, E. W. and Joseph H. Smith proprietors, (February 1912 – May 1912)

Smith & Moore Meat Market, Joseph Smith and A. H. “Allie” Moore proprietors (May 1912 – November 1915)

Moore’s Market, A. H. “Allie” and Fred Moore proprietors (November 1915 – March 1922)

Morell Bakery, Fred Morell proprietor (September 1922 – October 1926)

Yorkville Home Bakery (January 1931 - )

Lallemang Tailor Shop

Schneider’s Appliance and Paint Store, John & Ruth Schneider proprietors

 

In February 1979, the Illinois Department of Transportation announced that the Yorkville Public Library, Fred Schneider’s Reality office and Schneider’s Refrigeration and Appliance Store would be torn down to build a new four-lane bridge across the Fox River at Yorkville.

 

George Belden has sold his share of the Starr & Belden meat market to Mr. Starr. Mr. Belden will continue to work in the market.341

 

Rudolph Knapp has sold the meat market that was formerly owned by George Starr to Jacob C. Ringer and Harry O. Smith, possession being given Monday morning, August 21. Mr. Knapp found that his business in Oswego occupied most of his time and for that reason made the transfer. The men who make up the new firm are well known in Yorkville and should make a success of the business. Mr. Ringer has been employed by the Starr and Knapp markets and has a general knowledge of the business. Mr. Smith has lived in the village a number of years and has many friends. The firm will be operated under the name Ringer and Smith.342

 

The butcher shop formerly owned by George Starr and later operated by Ringer & Smith will be reopened tomorrow morning by Edward W. Smith and Joseph H. Smith, under the firm name Smith & Smith. They will carry all goods to be found in an up-to-date meat market and will endeavor to give satisfactory service. They will be assisted by A. H. Moore, one of the most experienced butchers in Yorkville.343

 

Edward W. Smith sold his interest in the Smith & Smith Meat Market to A. H. Moore the first of the week and the new firm took possession at once. The firm is now composed of A. H. Moore and Joseph Smith under the firm name of Smith & Moore.344

 

Joseph H. Smith has retired from the firm Smith & Moore and the business will be conducted by A. H. Moore & Son, who thank you for past favors and solicit your future patronage.345

 

A. H. Moore and son, Fred, have bought the interest of Joseph H. Smith in the market in Yorkville and will conduct the business under the name of Moore’s Market. Allie as he is familiarly called has been in the butchering business for so long that it has become second nature to him. His son, Fred has had several years training. They are well fitted to give the people of the vicinity the best the market affords. Mr. Smith the retiring partner will have the management of his farm and will help in its operation.346

 

Fred Morell is to move his bakery from the Biggar-Shaw building to the Starr building, recently vacated by Moore & Son Meat Market. Frank Skinner and Bert McOwan are doing the carpenter work. Walter B. McOwan is superintending the electrical work. Orville Perkins is busy doing the cement work and Frank R. Skinner is getting ready to paint the building. Mr. Morell plans on moving around the first of September. Orrie and Frank Wellman, John Hubbell, John Hart, Ira Perkins, Roy Agler and Irving Moenkemier are also helping remodel.347

 

Morell Bakery now has a new store in the building recently vacated by A. H. Moore and son. Carpenters and painters and other tradesmen have been busy for several weeks on the building and it is in first class shape. A basement was added and a new floor laid.

The front room has the different cases and is used as a wrapping room. The baking is done in the rear where the mixer, ovens, tables and other necessary articles are to be found.348

 

A new home bakery was opened in Yorkville, in the building formerly occupied by the Lallemang Tailor Shop, on Saturday. Mr. Tom Rankin is the proprietor.349

 

Street address: 108 South Bridge Street

Legal description: 25 by 100 feet north of Graham, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Cooper Harness Shop, John Cooper proprietor (January 1873 – November 1916)

Barber Shop (Sanborn 1892)

Koos Tailor & Cleaning Shop, Adam Koos proprietor, on the second floor (September 1903 – August 1917)

Koos Tailor & Cleaning Shop, Adam Koos proprietor purchased building in (August 1917 - )

Riverside Inn, Ben Graham proprietor

Schneider’s Appliance and Paint Store, John & Ruth Schneider proprietors

 

Mr. John Cooper is now located in his new building on the east side of South Bridge Street, where he has excellent arrangements for carrying on the harness business. He has the front room well-stocked with double and single harnesses, whips, robes, blankets, etc. The work room in the rear is very convenient, and John is ready to take your order for a new harness or to repair an old one.350

 

It is a matter of regret to the many friends of the veteran harness maker, John Cooper, to learn that he is to close out his business in Yorkville and to retire from business. He has been one of the forerunners of business in Yorkville, having been her forty-five years. He has made an enviable reputation for himself. Mr. Cooper’s health has failed him slightly and he feels that a rest is due him.351

 

Koos, the tailor, has moved his establishment from the Dolph building to the rooms over John Cooper’s harness store near the bridge.352

 

Fire badly damaged Graham’s Riverside Inn tavern in the Koos building early Tuesday morning. The Bristol and Yorkville Fire Departments worked on a stubborn, smoldering fire until the threat had been removed but the building was damaged beyond repair. The fire apparently started behind the bar, burned through the basement and then spread through the walls. The tavern stock was badly damaged as were the furnishings.

It was fortunate that the fire companies were so efficient, as the building was a frame structure with two other wooden buildings on each side, C. H. Houck’s and Fred Ohse’s Grocery Store. It takes no stretch of the imagination to see how easily the whole block of buildings could have been destroyed if the flames had gotten out of control.

Graham’s stock was covered by insurance, but it is understood that the building was uninsured. The property is owned by Mrs. Katherine Koos Riddle of Chicago.353

 

Lot 1: John Cooper to Mary Koos, 25 by 100 feet on lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1917, $500.

 

 

Street address: 110 South Bridge Street

Legal description: 50 feet frontage on Bridge Street and 100 feet frontage on Hydraulic Avenue, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

East side of South Bridge Street and north side of East Hydraulic Avenue.

The brick blacksmith shop on the corner was built in 1864 by William Graham.

 

Blacksmith Shop, William Gallier proprietor ( - September 1864)

Graham Blacksmith Shop, William & brother proprietors (September 1864 - )

Graves Blacksmith Shop, Paul Graves proprietor ( - March 1907)

Houck Blacksmith Shop, Clinton H. “Dick” Houck proprietor

Schneider’s Appliance and Paint Store

 

William Graham, the village blacksmith has purchased the shop he occupies from Mr. Gallier.354

 

Paul Graves, the blacksmith who operated the brick shop on the corner of South Bridge Street and Hydraulic Avenue for several months this past winter, has closed the doors and moved with his family to Aurora, where he will be employed in the Frazier shops.355

 

Street address: 105? East Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description:

Building is on the north side of East Hydraulic Avenue, and is the first building east of William Graham and Clinton H. “Dick” Houck’s blacksmith shops on the northeast corner of South Bridge Street and East Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Conrath Meat Market, Rudolph Conrath proprietor (May 1878 – )

Goodrich Shoe Shop, John Goodrich proprietor

 

Rudolph Conrath has opened a new meat market on East Hydraulic Avenue, the first door east of Graham’s blacksmith shop. He will keep all kinds of choice meats, hams bologna, lard, etc., and will be glad to receive a portion of the trade of this vicinity. Everything around the shop will be kept neat and clean, and nothing but first-class meat will be sold.356

 

During one of the heavy winds of last week the old cobbler shop building formerly occupied by the late John Goodrich left its moorings and came near tipping clear over. The chimney went down and now the whole building has settled back away from the sidewalk, near the Biggar furniture store, and is about ready to fall in a heap. It is an unsightly object as it now stands, and it is hoped that it will not be allowed to disfigure East Hydraulic Avenue.357

 

 

Street address: East Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description: 50 feet east end of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Biggar Carpenter Shop and Furniture Repair, Thomas Biggar proprietor Biggar Furniture Store, Thomas Biggar proprietor ( - March 1915)

Shaw Furniture, Clarence A. & Fern S. Shaw proprietors (March 1915 – July 1915)

Shaw Furniture Store, Marian Biggar Shaw proprietor (July 1915 – March 1916)

Preston Millinery, Mabel Preston proprietor (March 1915 - )

Biggar & Shaw Carpenter Shop, Thomas Biggar & Clarence Shaw proprietors

Carpenter Shop, Clarence Shaw proprietor

Morell Bakery, Fred Morell proprietor ( - September 1922)

Quinsey Auto Repair, John “Jack” Quinsey proprietor (November 1928 - )

 

Thomas Biggar, furniture dealer, wishing to retire from active business, has sold his store and workshop to Clarence A. and Fern S. Shaw, who will carry on the business. These men are well qualified mechanics and energetic workmen and will serve you right. I will be with them and assist in anything I can do for you. Signed, Thomas Biggar.358

 

The furniture business conducted so many years by Thomas Biggar is now under the management of the M. Biggar Shaw Co. We would solicit the same courtesy and cooperation the people of the county have extended to Mr. Biggar. The repair and upholstering will still be under the care of Mr. Biggar. We will show some radical reductions in living room, porch and lawn furniture, desk chairs, and many other articles to make room for new stock. Store will be open Wednesday and Saturday evenings through the summer months. If you have an account with Mr. Biggar, please call and settle at the furniture store.359

M. Biggar Shaw was Thomas Biggar’s daughter Marian (Biggar) Shaw who married Clarence A. Shaw.

 

“Jack” Quinsey will move from his location north of the post office to the place formerly occupied by Clarence Shaw as a carpenter shop, recently purchased by Monte Tillitson. This will give Mr. Quinsey a store, work room and a place in which automobiles can be driven for repairs to tops, curtains, etc.360

 

Going out of the furniture business, come in and supply your needs for furniture. Exceptional bargains are available. M. Biggar Shaw Company.361

 

Miss Mabel Preston opened her millinery business in Bristol in March 1915.

Miss Mabel Preston of Newark will open her Yorkville Millinery Store on Monday March 29, 1915. The business will be in charge of Miss Ethel Barrows of Yorkville whom Miss Preston will assist on Mondays and Fridays of each week. Miss Preston is a milliner of experience and will be glad to serve the people of Yorkville at her new rooms on the north side.362

 

Change in location. After April 1, 1916 my Millinery Store will be located in the east half of the Shaw building in Yorkville where I will be glad to meet and serve all former patrons and welcome new customers. Miss Mabel Preston, Yorkville, Illinois.363

 

Fred Morell is to move his bakery from the Biggar-Shaw building to the Starr building, recently vacated by Moore & Son Meat Market. Frank Skinner and Bert McOwan are doing the carpenter work. Walter B. McOwan is superintending the electrical work. Orville Perkins is busy doing the cement work and Frank R. Skinner is getting ready to paint the building. Mr. Morell plans on moving around the first of September. Orrie and Frank Wellman, John Hubbell, John Hart, Ira Perkins, Roy Agler and Irving Moenkemier are also helping remodel.364

 

Thomas Biggar, 50 feet east end of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $100.

 

M. Biggar – Shaw Co., 50 feet east end of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $234.

 

M. Biggar – Shaw Co., 50 feet east end of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $300.

 

 

Lot 1: Elias A. Black & wife to Jacob P. Black, Lot 5, block 4, and lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 3, 1861, $253.50.

Lot 1: Jacob P. Black & wife to William Graham, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 26, 1864, $1,000.

Lot 1: Jacob P. Black & wife to Carlos Stevens, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 26, 1866, $820.

Lot 1: Carlos Stevens & wife to Thomas N. Springer, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 3, 1869, $150.

Lot 1: Thomas N. Springer & wife to George W. Smith and John R. Skidmore, part lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1869.

Lot 1: George W. Smith and John R. Skidmore to Thomas N. Springer, part lot 1, block 5 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 2, 1870.

Lot 1: Carlos Stevens & wife to William Puderbaugh, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 3, 1871, $100.

Lot 1: Carlos Stevens & wife to John Cooper, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 16, 1872, $187.50.

Lot 1: Thomas N. Springer & wife to Charles G. Morgan, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 29, 1871, $200.

Lot 1: Rudolph Conrath to Oscar Dolph, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 26, 1877, $600.

Lot 1: Carlos Stevens & wife to William Graham, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 10, 1874, $1,200.

Lot 1: Steven Carlos & wife to Rudolph Conrath, piece 27 by 100 feet in lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 27, 1875, $400.

Lot 1: William Graham & wife to Thomas Biggar, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 14, 1880, $325.

Lot 1: Daniel G. Johnson to Orson Dolph, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 11, 1880, $150.

Lot 1: Orson Dolph & wife to Mrs. Susanna Smith, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 19, 1884, $275.

Lot 1: Susanna Smith to George G. Starr, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 9, 1887, $1,000.

Lot 1: Heirs of William Graham to Grace Graham, lot 1, block 5; and lots 1 and 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892.

Lot 1: Grace Graham to George H. Saxon, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1903, $1,000.

Lot 1: George H. Saxon to Clinton H. Houck, part lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1912, $1,100.

Lot 1: Thomas Biggar to Margaret (Biggar) Shaw, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1915.

Lot 1: John Cooper to Mary Koos, 25 by 100 feet on lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1917, $500.

Lot 1: Carrie B. Armbruster (Mrs. Jacob) and Nettie B. Palmer (Nettie Belle (Starr) Palmer, Mrs. Hugh G.) to Julius C. Schlapp, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1918, $1,200.

Lot 1: Earl C. Puderbaugh to Maude P. Vaughn, undivided half interest in part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1920.

Lot 1: Maude P. Vaughan to Ethel McOwan, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1920.

Lot 1: Title chain broken.

Lot 1: Clinton H. Houck to Clara L. Howes, part lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1923.

Lot 1: Margaret Biggar Shaw and husband to M. F. Tillitson, part of lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1928.

Lot 1: Bernard J. and Jane M. Stumm to Mary E. Tillitson, Q.C.D., part of section 23-37-7 (sic 33-37-7?,) lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1937.

 

William Graham, 50 feet frontage on Bridge Street and 100 feet frontage on Hydraulic Avenue, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

John Cooper, 25 by 100 feet north of Graham, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

George Starr, 27 by 100 feet north of Cooper, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $115.

 

George Starr, 23 by 100 feet north of preceding description, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $75.

 

William Puderbaugh, 35 by 100 feet north of Starr, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $80.

 

Clinton H. Houck, 50 feet frontage on Bridge Street and 100 feet frontage on Hydraulic Avenue, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $500.

 

Mary Koos, 25 by 100 feet north of Houck’s, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $300.

 

Ethel McOwan, 27 by 100 feet north of Koos, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $500.

 

Ethel McOwan, 23 by 100 feet north of Starr, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $280.

 

Ethel McOwan Stiles, 35 by 100 feet north of Starr’s, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $280.

 

Clinton H. Houck, 50 feet frontage on Bridge Street and 100 feet frontage on Hydraulic Avenue, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,000.

 

Christina F. Kenney, , 25 by 100 feet north Houck’s, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $600.

 

Ethel McOwan Stiles, 27 by 100 feet north of Koos, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,000.

 

Ethel McOwan Stiles, 23 by 100 feet north of Starr, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $250.

 

Ethel McOwan Stiles, 35 by 100 feet north of the preceding description, lot 1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $560.

 

Florence R. Tillitson, 50 feet of the southeast corner of lot 1, block 5, on Hydraulic Avenue, 1931 T-A, $600.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: ? East Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description:

Lot is between South Bridge Street and the location of the City Hotel.

 

Lamp Blacksmith Shop, John H. Lamp proprietor (November 1913 – March 1915)

Lindley Blacksmith Shop, John Lindley proprietor (March 1915 - )

 

John H. Lamp’s new blacksmith shop was next to the Yorkville Garage. In December 1912, he announced in the Record that he was open and ready for business at the same prices as before.365

 

In March 1915, John Lindley rented the John H. Lamp blacksmith shop in Yorkville. Mr. Lindley announced in the Record that he was prepared to do horseshoeing and general blacksmithing, plow and wagon repairing.366

 

 

Street address: 123 East Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: lot 2 and 3-1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Church Road-Carts and Buggy Factory, W. R. Church and John Robinson proprietors (October 1874 – November 1874)

Church Road-Carts and Buggy Factory, W. R. Church proprietor (November 1874 – )

City Hotel, Jacob & Albertina (Beck) Helmuth proprietors (December 1889 – circa 1901)

Bowling Alley, Charles Bliss proprietor (October 1903 – )

Garage

Rehbehn Brothers Button Factory

Yorkville Garage & Vulcanizing Company, C. W. “Billy” Smith and R. T. Smith proprietors (September 1916 – June 1917)

Yorkville Garage & Vulcanizing Company, C. W. “Billy” Smith proprietor (June 1917 - )

Rasmussen Garage, William L. Ford manager. The Rasmussen Garage was headquarter at Newark.

Ford & Wright Garage, William L. Ford & Fred L. Wright proprietors (March 1922 - )

Sheer & Jones Hudson & Essex Automobiles and Farm Machinery Sales & Repairs, Jesse Sheer and Charles “Charlie” Jones proprietors ( - August 1926)

Dhuse Chevrolet Automobiles and Tires, Herman A. Dhuse proprietor (September 1926 - )

 

In October 1874, Mr. W. R. Church and John R. Robinson, of Bristol leased the building of the Yorkville Manufacturing Company and undertook to run a business which had been tried and found to be unprofitable by many others, but which they thought they might make pay. In less than a month the firm dissolved, and Mr. Church took charge of the business alone, with little patronage and less encouragement. He stuck to it believing that by good work and close attention to business, a good trade could be established here, and he was not mistaken, for he now has secured a good number of customers.

Since that time, Mr. Church has purchased the building he now occupies, and had it remodeled on the inside…The work rooms are in the rear of building, half of which are being used for the wood work, where Mr. Church is always found to be busy. The other half is used as a blacksmith shop, where Mr. P. B. Prescott, an experienced blacksmith and his assistant, Ed. Moore, are always at work. The paint room is upstairs, where Captain John A. Beeman, the best painter in this section, holds forth. These rooms are where the buggies and wagons receive the finishing touches, which attract so much attention and admiration when the buggy makes its appearance in the show room and on the street.

The front room of the building is now used as the show room, and it is large, well lighted and shows the work off to good advantage. This room is now filled with fine specimens of workmanship, most of which have been made to order. Here will be found the family buggy, which every well-to-do man should have; the phaeton, for the old folks; the single buggy, with or without top, for the young folks; the light three-spring wagon, one of the most useful wagons a farmer can have.

Mr. Church makes a specialty of fine work, and his carriages and buggies are giving the best satisfaction. He is receiving orders from every town in the vicinity, and even gets orders from Aurora and Sandwich. His work can be seen at all times on our streets, and if you call at the shop he is ever ready and willing to answer your questions, explain the work and take your order.

The people of Kendall County should give Church their patronage. He has shown an energy and determination that is bound to succeed. In a few years we may expect he will have one of the largest carriage factories in the Fox Valley.367

 

We called on W. R. Church, the big carriage manufacturer at Yorkville and found him doing a good business. His trade is larger this season than ever before. His shop is crowed with work that is finished and ready for delivery, and he still has orders on hand from nearly every township in Kendall County. Over two hundred vehicles of his manufacture are now in use in this county. While looking through the shop we noticed a platform spring wagon with lamps and mud fenders, elegantly finished in every particular, which belonged to Thomas Atherton, and only cost $125. The same vehicle is sold by other dealers everywhere costs $175. He also called our attention to another platform spring buggy, with patent adjustable carriage awning, and complete in every respect which sells at the extremely low price of $110 and $115. A top carriage, which shows off in elegant style was sent from Mr. Church’s establishment to Houston, Texas, Thursday. His shops also contain two fine phaetons which belong to Kendall County farmers. They are finished in magnificent shape and cannot be surpassed by any in this section of the country, and he has orders for two more. No wonder everybody buys from Mr. Church; his prices are low and his goods are superior and he is honorable and square in his dealings.368

 

On Friday, last week, a member of the Record office visited the manufacturing establishment of Mr. W. R. Church, on East Hydraulic Avenue and found it a bustling business.

Ten years ago Mr. Church started in Yorkville as a carriage maker; then with a blacksmith, he did all the work of his shop alone. From that time to this his business has been on the increase, until today he is done a very large business for a town like Yorkville.

From time to time he has been obliged to enlarge his rooms and increase his forces, until today he occupies a 40 by 90 feet, two story building. His wood room and blacksmith shop are on the first floor and his paint shop and trimming room is on the second floor. He now has a large force of men at work, no boys, all mechanics, who understand their business thoroughly. He is make a fine line of carriages and buggies, and at the present time, is enjoying a large number of orders for his celebrated road cart. His force is now able to turn out these carts very fast, and if orders come in as fast in the future as in the past, he will soon be turning out twenty-four a week. Yesterday (Thursday), he loaded a car with these carts at Yorkville depot, which were destined for nine different states including Minnesota and Louisiana.

Mr Church says he is surprised at the amount of business he has been doing, but he expects by constant attention to business his business will increase further. His work gives the best satisfaction; using only the very best material, and employing workmen who are thoroughly competent and understand their business, the work that goes out from his factory always pleases his patrons and brings him new customers. He is now adding new and improved machinery, so he can turn out work faster than before.

Mr. Church has recently added a large steam engine and boiler to run his machinery, which is a great improvement. He personally superintends the business, and carefully watches every piece of work that is don so that no second-class work or inferior material can get into his vehicles.

 

In 1889, Jacob Helmuth purchased lot 2, and part of lot 3, blocks 5, of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. The property was on the north side of East Hydraulic Avenue and previously housed the Church road cart factory property. Mr. Helmuth built new foundations and moved the Beck Hotel buildings to the site. At the same time the building formerly owned by Dr. Harris was moved from the block west of the courthouse, and attached to the hotel. The buildings were remodeled to serve as a hotel and bar.369 Part of the Church road cart factory was utilized as a stable.

Kendall County's premier building mover, George H. Nichols, was hired to move the buildings. Progress reports appeared in the Kendall County Record. "The Beck Hotel building is at the Methodist Church corner."370George Nichols got the old Beck Hotel building down the hill in good shape. The building crossed the railroad track at noon yesterday, only delaying an extra freight train about an hour. The building is now opposite its new foundation on the Church road cart premises.371 The old Beck Hotel buildings are now on the new foundations down by the paper mills. The new establishment is to be called the City Hotel.372

In December 1889, the City Hotel opened for business. It was convenient to the depot, and only a few minutes walk from the post office and courthouse.373

Advertisement for the City Hotel: Ready for Business! City Hotel, (near the depot) Yorkville, Illinois. J. Helmuth, Proprietor. Board by the day or week. Good accommodations for travelers. Meals at any hour of the day.374

When Mrs. George Beck (Later Albertina Helmuth) was landlady of Beck's Hotel many of the people from the southern part of Kendall County stayed there while attending court or on other business. They continued to stay with her in the City Hotel because of the good meals she had served in the hotel on the hill.

In May 1890, Jacob Helmuth was charged with selling liquor to men named Bell, Wilcox, and Griffith. They purchased two kegs of beer, went out into the river in a boat, got drunk, fell out, and drowned. Mrs. Sarah Bell and her five children were left destitute. She brought suit against the Helmuths for $20,000 damages under the Dram-shop Act.

After considerable legal maneuvering, the Helmuths lost their case to Mrs. Bell for the drowning of her husband in Fox River while intoxicated. In 1891 a verdict was rendered for $5,000 damages to the plaintiff. The Helmuths were financially ruined and lost the City Hotel. In addition to their personal financial ruin, the two men who had provided their bond, Henry C. Schumaker and William "Perry" Ferguson (sometimes Fargusson) were also hit hard. Schumaker had used his Fox Township farm as security and consequently lost the farm.375,376,377

After exhausting all legal remedies, Mr. Helmuth advertised the hotel for sale "due to ill health" and sought other employment. Jacob supposedly tried to make an exchange with George Cassens for a saloon on Third Street in Sterling, IL, but the exchange was not completed.378 After his failure to obtain the saloon in Sterling, it was announced that the Helmuths would remain at the City Hotel. In addition to an existing mortgage, the hotel premises were further encumbered by Mrs. Bell's claim. An attempt was made to restructure the mortgage and bonds, and arrange financial matters so the Helmuths could continue in business. Peter Riecherts supposedly agreed to assume financial responsibility for the City Hotel. Helmuth's bondsmen, Henry Schumaker and William "Perry" Ferguson were called upon to pay Mrs. Bell's claim.379

The financial problems could not be overcome and the Helmuths were out. In June 1892, Mr. Kissel was managing the City Hotel. A stable and hack (bus) were operated in conjunction with the hotel. Hotel guests could keep and care for their horses in the large barn at the rear of the hotel.380

In July 1892, Jacob Helmuth and his family left Yorkville for Chicago where Jake operated a saloon on West 21st Street.381

At this time, Allie Moore rented the City Hotel and became the landlord.382 The following advertisement appeared in the local newspaper. City Hotel (Near the depot) Yorkville, Illinois. A. H. Moore, Proprietor. Board by the day or week. Good accommodations for travelers. Meals at any hour of the day.383

The City Hotel was bought by the Nels Cassem Estate and from time to time was opened and closed. In March 1898, Fred Ohse assumed the management of the hotel. The hotel was painted and papered throughout, new fixtures and furniture purchased, and the office remodeled. The Yorkville electric lighting plant was in operation, and lights were installed throughout the building. Mr. Ohse promised his clientele that by next winter the rooms would be heated by steam. The old barroom east of the office was repainted and papered and offered for dances and large parties.384,385

At some point, the hotel closed again. In June 1901, there was a notice that the City Hotel had reopened and was re-furnished throughout. Room rates were $1.00 per day, "good meals" cost 25 cents. The rate to board there was $3.50 per week. Mrs. E. N. Speer proprietor.386 The hotel eventually closed for good.

 

At the regular meeting of the village board Monday night, Charles Bliss was granted a license to construct and operate a combined billiard and pool hall in the old City Hotel building near the railroad track. The establishment will be a costly affair costing from $1,500 to $1,800. It remains to be seen whether or not there is enough enthusiast in town to make the project pay. Alderman Williams and Nading were put on the committee to investigate and fix the amount of the license, which will doubtless be about twenty-five dollars per annum.387

 

A deal was closed with the Cassem estate Monday by which the old city hotel property and grounds became the property of the Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association. This organization is now incorporated and this purchase is the first of its efforts to add business to the village. It is thought that the button companies will move their plants into this building and thereby save much time.

 

The object of the Association is to get factories into the village and this building will be able to accommodate more than the button factories. Negotiations will be started at once to get some other company to occupy the balance of the building. 388

Rehbehn Brothers moved their button factory to the old city hotel building Saturday and start Monday morning full blast in their new location. This site is much better for them as they now have running water and electric motor power. The factory has grown in size since it was started and now employs ten men besides the two proprietors.389

 

The Yorkville Industrial and Improvement Association have leased the remainder of the City Hotel property. A shoemaker from Montgomery, said to be an efficient cobbler, will occupy the part of the first floor that is not now being used by the button cutting factory. This is a needed adjunct to the village and it is hoped the workman will stay.

The barn in the rear of the building has been rented to Dr. R. F. Hoadley who will install a horse hospital there where he will practice veterinary surgery in conjunction with his other work.390

 

In October 1914, the old City Hotel building in Yorkville was destroyed by fire. The origin of the blaze was unknown although the fire was first discovered near the chimney at the east end of the building. An electrical short in the attic was considered a possible cause. There was very little insurance coverage. Hard work on the part of the local firemen saved the adjoining barn used by veterinarian, Dr. R. F. Hoadley as a horse hospital. The Thomas Biggar furniture store was also threatened but did not ignite.

 

At the time of the fire, the Rehbehn Brothers button factory utilized most of the building. Nearly all their machinery, valued at about $1,000, was lost. Several bags of button blanks, worth some $1,600 were saved.

 

Dr. Hoadley who occupied the barn next door saved all of his property. Seven horses in the barn were safely remove as well as his instruments and medicine. The Frank Rudakis, George Hanson and Fred Jones families lived on the second floor of the building. They lost practically all of their household goods.

 

When the alarm was given, assistance arrived in a short time and every effort was made to keep the fire under control. The absence of wind made it easier to prevent the spread of the flames, and the firefighters were able to save a barn that was part of the former Church Road Cart factory, and only three feet from the burning building.

 

The frame construction of the old hotel building made it a veritable firetrap, and the interior burned like tinder. Yorkville's newly installed water service was a godsend in fighting the fire and keeping the flames under control. The Electric pump at the reservoir was able to keep two streams of water running constantly while maintaining the water pressure, and the volume of available water kept the sparks to a minimum.

 

At the time of the fire, the Yorkville Industrial and Improvement Association owned the building, which was insured for about $800. The button factory had been shut down for about a year and the place had been vacant most of the time. However, the Rehbehn Brothers were getting ready to start cutting shells again. Thirty-four machines had been installed and were waiting for a new motor when they were destroyed. There was a small amount of insurance on the machinery but not enough to cover the loss. 391

 

In 1916 a new garage building was built by George M. Johnson on the former site of the City Hotel, which had been destroyed by fire in October 1914. In 1918 and addition equal in size to the original building was attached to the original.392

 

George M. Johnson is planning a new garage building to occupy the space left by the burning of old City Hotel on East Hydraulic Avenue. A deal was closed last week when the property was bought from the Yorkville Industrial and Improvement Association. There was a clause in the deed demanding the immediate erection of a garage building. The garage will be modern in every sense of the word and will be in a good location. Mr. Johnson will build a garage 100 feet long and 60 feet wide. It will be on the site of the old City Hotel, next to the river and adjacent to the old paper mill property.393

 

The Yorkville Garage and Vulcanizing Company of which Billy Smith is the proprietor, has moved to its new quarters between South Bridge Street and the Burlington depot on East Hydraulic Avenue. It is a modern garage in every way, recently completed by George M. Johnson. There is ample space for display, storage, machine work, and a place of business of which anyone could be proud of. The balance of the new machinery will be installed soon when a more comprehensive description will be given.394

 

Notice is hereby given that the partnership between C. W. Smith and R. T. Smith doing business under the firm name of the Yorkville Garage and Vulcanizing Company was dissolved June 1, 1917. All accounts are now due and payable to C. W. Smith who will continue the business.395

 

The Dodge Brothers Motor Car Company has changed its agency in Yorkville and is now being handled by the Yorkville Garage (& Vulcanizing Company.) Billy Smith, the manager of the agency is glad to get the representation of this car and promises to carry a complete line of repairs and to make his garage a service station at all times. The Dodge car is too well known to need further explanation. It is one of the most popular of the lower priced cars and has a good reputation. If you are driving one of these machines, make the Yorkville Garage more of a home than ever.396

 

William L. Ford and Fred L. Wright have bought the garage business in Yorkville which has been operated by the Rasmussen Garage Company of Newark. The Ford agency for a large part of the county comes with the business. Mr. Ford has been manager of the garage for the Rasmussen people for several months and has made it a success. Wright has been in the automobile business for a significant period of time.397

 

There has been a general shakeup in the business in the garage occupied by Sheer & Jones and Herman A. Dhuse. Herman A. Dhuse has bought the building and will move his tire business into the west side of the building and will have the local agency for Chevrolet automobiles. He will rent the east side of the building to a garage repair man.

Sheer and Jones have not made any real plans for the future at this time. Jesse Sheer will continue in the team contracting business and Charlie Jones will continue to sell automobiles.

There will be no real change in the partnership before the end of the month, when the building is turned over to the new owner. The farm machinery business will be dropped as soon as the implements on hand can be disposed of. The future of the Hudson Essex agency is still in doubt.398

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Thomas T. Britton, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 30, 1864, $100.

Lot 2: Thomas T. Britton to Lee & Easley, (Henry R. Lee) lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 2, 1866, $125.

Lot 2: Henry R. Lee, et al, to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 6, 1866, $150.

Lot 2: Daniel G. Johnson & wife to Andrew P. Dixon, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 22, 1867, $250.

Lot 2: Andrew P. Dixon to John E. & Charles F. (Fox) Crum, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 3, 1868, $1,800.

Lot 2: John M. Matlock & wife to Heman J. Winchell, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 27, 1870, $1,000.

Lot 2: John E. Crum & wife (Alida “Louisa” (Matlock) Crum) to Heman T. Winchell, undivided half of lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 20, 1871, $1,000.

Lot 2: Heman T. Winchell & wife to Isaac Crooker & Franklin M. Hobbs, lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 9, 1872, $1,100.

Lot 2: Isaac Crooker & Franklin M. Hobbs, to Carlos Stevens, undivided 2/5th of lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 23, 1872, $800.

Lot 2: Franklin M. Hobbs to Isaac Crooker, undivided half interest in undivided 3/5th of lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 14, 1873, $750.

Lot 2: Isaac Crooker, et al, to Roana Foster, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 10, 1876, $1,200.

Lot 2: Carlos Stevens, et al, to Roana Foster, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 10, 1876, $1,200.

Lot 2: Roana Foster to Ann Church, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 17, 1887.

Lot 2: Ann Church to Roana Carter, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1889, $1,200.

Lot 2: Roana Carter & husband to Albertina Helmuth, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 24, 1889, $825. (City Hotel property.)

Lot 2: Master in Chancery to Nels O. Cassem, Certificate of purchase, City Hotel property, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1894, $2,586.

Lot 2: Olive J. Osmondson, et al, to Randall Cassem, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1906.

Lot 2: Maggie A. Cassem to William T. Boston, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1911, $800.

Lot 2: William T. Boston to Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association, lot 2 and part of lot 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1911, $800.

Lot 2: Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association to George M. Johnson, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1916, $450.

Lot 2: George M. Johnson to the Rasmussen Motor Company, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1919, $10,000.

Lot 2: Rasmussen Motor Co., to Alfred N. Thorsen, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1922, $8,000.

Lot 2: Alfred N. Thorsen and wife, Louisa M., to Jesse Sheer and Charlie Jones, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1926, $8,500.

Lot 2: Jesse Sheer, et al, to Herman A. Dhuse, lot 2 and 66 feet of the west end of lot 3, north of railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1928, $11,000.

Lot 2: Herman A. Dhuse to M. F. Tillitson, lot 2 and 66 feet of the west end of lot 3, north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1928, $11,000.

 

Nels O. Cassem, lot 2, block 5, 1899 T-A, $600.

 

George M. Johnson, all lot 2 and west 66 feet of the west end of lot 3, north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1917 T-A, increased to $956.

 

Rasmussen Motor Company, all lot 2 and west 66 feet of the west end of lot 3, north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, increased to $1,520.

 

Alfred N. Thorsen, all lot 2 and west 66 feet of lot 3, north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1924 T-A, increased to $2,280.

 

Herman A. Dhuse, all lot 2 and west 66 feet of lot 3 north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,280.

 

Florence R. Tillitson, all lot 2 and west 66 feet of lot 3 north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $4,560.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: 123 East Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: lot 2 and 3-1, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Andrew P. Dixon Livery Stable ( - June 1867)

James Heustis Livery Stable (June 1867 - )

Church Road Cart Factory

City Hotel

Bowling Alley

Garage

Rehbehn Brothers Button Factory

 

Mr. Andrew Dixon has sold his stable and its appurtenances to Mr. James Heustis. The new proprietor intends to make several improvements in the business. He is now running the large omnibus to the trains. Note this would be the trains in Bristol Station as the railroad had not reached Yorkville by this time.399

 

In 1889, Jacob Helmuth purchased lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. The property was on the north side of East Hydraulic Avenue and previously housed the Church road cart factory property. Mr. Helmuth built new foundations and moved the Beck Hotel buildings to the site. At the same time the building formerly owned by Dr. Harris was moved from the block west of the courthouse, and attached to the hotel. The buildings were remodeled to serve as a hotel and bar.400 Part of the Church road cart factory was utilized as a stable.

Kendall County's premier building mover, George H. Nichols, was hired to move the buildings. Progress reports appeared in the Kendall County Record. "The Beck Hotel building is at the Methodist Church corner."401George Nichols got the old Beck Hotel building down the hill in good shape. The building crossed the railroad track at noon yesterday, only delaying an extra freight train about an hour. The building is now opposite its new foundation on the Church road cart premises.402 The old Beck Hotel buildings are now on the new foundations down by the paper mills. The new establishment is to be called the City Hotel.403

In December 1889, the City Hotel opened for business. It was convenient to the depot, and only a few minutes walk from the post office and courthouse.404

Advertisement for the City Hotel: Ready for Business! City Hotel, (near the depot) Yorkville, Illinois. J. Helmuth Proprietor. Board by the day or week. Good accommodations for travelers. Meals at any hour of the day.405

When Mrs. George Beck (Later Albertina Helmuth) was landlady of Beck's Hotel many of the people from the southern part of Kendall County stayed there while attending court or on other business. They continued to stay with her in the City Hotel because of the good meals she had served in the hotel on the hill.

In May 1890, Jacob Helmuth was charged with selling liquor to men named Bell, Wilcox, and Griffith. They purchased two kegs of beer, went out into the river in a boat, got drunk, fell out, and drowned. Mrs. Sarah Bell and her five children were left destitute. She brought suit against the Helmuths for $20,000 damages under the Dram-shop Act.

After considerable legal maneuvering, the Helmuths lost their case to Mrs. Bell for the drowning of her husband in Fox River while intoxicated. In 1891 a verdict was rendered for $5,000 damages to the plaintiff. The Helmuths were financially ruined and lost the City Hotel. In addition to their personal financial ruin, the two men who had provided their bond, Henry C. Schumaker and William "Perry" Ferguson (sometimes Fargusson) were also hit hard. Schumaker had used his Fox Township farm as security and consequently lost the farm.406,407,408

After exhausting all legal remedies, Mr. Helmuth advertised the hotel for sale "due to ill health" and sought other employment. Jacob supposedly tried to make an exchange with George Cassens for a saloon on Third Street in Sterling, IL, but the exchange was not completed.409 After his failure to obtain the saloon in Sterling, it was announced that the Helmuths would remain at the City Hotel. In addition to an existing mortgage, the hotel premises were further encumbered by Mrs. Bell's claim. An attempt was made to restructure the mortgage and bonds, and arrange financial matters so the Helmuths could continue in business. Peter Riecherts supposedly agreed to assume financial responsibility for the City Hotel. Helmuth's bondsmen, Henry Schumaker and William "Perry" Farguson were called upon to pay Mrs. Bell's claim.410

The financial problems could not be overcome and the Helmuths were out. In June 1892, Mr. Kissel was managing the City Hotel. A stable and hack (bus) were operated in conjunction with the hotel. Hotel guests could keep and care for their horses in the large barn at the rear of the hotel.411

In July 1892, Jacob Helmuth and his family left Yorkville for Chicago where Jake operated a saloon on West 21st Street.412

At this time, Allie Moore rented the City Hotel and became the landlord.413 The following advertisement appeared in the local newspaper. City Hotel (Near the depot) Yorkville, Illinois. A. H. Moore, Proprietor. Board by the day or week. Good accommodations for travelers. Meals at any hour of the day.414

The City Hotel was bought by the Nels Cassem Estate and from time to time was opened and closed. In March 1898, Fred Ohse assumed the management of the hotel. The hotel was painted and papered throughout, new fixtures and furniture purchased, and the office remodeled. The Yorkville electric lighting plant was in operation, and lights were installed throughout the building. Mr. Ohse promised his clientele that by next winter the rooms would be heated by steam. The old barroom east of the office was repainted and papered and offered for dances and large parties.415,416

At some point, the hotel closed again. In June 1901, there was a notice that the City Hotel had reopened and was re-furnished throughout. Room rates were $1.00 per day, "good meals" cost 25 cents. The rate to board there was $3.50 per week. Mrs. E. N. Speer proprietor.417

The hotel eventually closed for good, and the location was used as a bowling alley, garage, and various other minor businesses.

 

In 1905, the heirs of the Cassem Estate agreed to sell their Yorkville property at auction.418 The Yorkville Improvement Association bought the City Hotel buildings and the Rehbehn Brothers started a button factory there. Families of those who worked in the button factory lived upstairs.

In October 1914, the old City Hotel building in Yorkville was destroyed by fire. The origin of the blaze was unknown although the fire was first discovered near the chimney at the east end of the building. An electrical short in the attic was considered a possible cause. There was very little insurance coverage. Hard work on the part of the local firemen saved the adjoining barn used by veterinarian, Dr. R. F. Hoadley as a horse hospital. The Thomas Biggar furniture store was also threatened but did not ignite.

At the time of the fire, the Rehbehn Brothers button factory utilized most of the building. Nearly all their machinery, valued at about $1,000, was lost. Several bags of button blanks, worth some $1,600 were saved.

Dr. Hoadley who occupied the barn next door saved all of his property. Seven horses in the barn were safely remove as well as his instruments and medicine. The Frank Rudakis, George Hanson and Fred Jones families lived on the second floor of the building. They lost practically all of their household goods.

When the alarm was given, assistance arrived in a short time and every effort was made to keep the fire under control. The absence of wind made it easier to prevent the spread of the flames, and the firefighters were able to save a barn that was part of the former Church Road Cart factory, and only three feet from the burning building.

The frame construction of the old hotel building made it a veritable firetrap, and the interior burned like tinder. Yorkville's newly installed water service was a godsend in fighting the fire and keeping the flames under control. The Electric pump at the reservoir was able to keep two streams of water running constantly while maintaining the water pressure, and the volume of available water kept the sparks to a minimum.

At the time of the fire, the Yorkville Industrial and Improvement Association owned the building, which was insured for about $800. The button factory had been shut down for about a year and the place had been vacant most of the time. However, the Rehbehn Brothers were getting ready to start cutting shells again. Thirty-four machines had been installed and were waiting for a new motor when they were destroyed. There was a small amount of insurance on the machinery but not enough to cover the loss. 419

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Hebard & Nicholson, part lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 6, 1865, $110.

Lot 3: John Nicholson & wife to Charles Hebard, part lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 7, 1866, $400.

Lot 3: Charles Hebard to Andrew P. Dixon, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 30, 1866, $800.

Lot 3: Andrew P. Dixon to James C. Heustis, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 23, 1867, $1400.

Lot 3: James C. Heustis to Andrew P. Dixon, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 28, 1867, $1,000.

Lot 3: Andrew P. Dixon to John E. & Charles F. (Fox) Crum, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 3, 1868, $1,800.

Lot 3: Isaac Crooker, et al, to Roana Foster, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 10, 1876, $1,200.

Lot 3: Elias A. Black to Charles A. Young, et al, undivided half of part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 24, 1878, $6,000.

Lot 3: Louisa, Executor Black to Charles A. Young, et al, Executor’s deed, undivided half of part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 24, 1878, $6,000.

Lot 3: Charles A. Young to Charles J. Black, et al, undivided 1/3 of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 3, 1880, $2,200.

Lot 3: Elias A. Black & wife to Charles J. Black, et al, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 31, 1880, $3,050.

Lot 3: Milton E. Cornell & wife to Fox River Paper Co., part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; also part of northwest quarter section 33, Kendall Township, March 21, 1882, $3,000.

Lot 3: Lucius Clark & Charles J. Black to May V. Black, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 20, 1883, $3,006.

Lot 3: Roana Foster to Ann Church, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 17, 1887.

Lot 3: Ann Church to Roana Carter, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1889, $1,200.

Lot 3: Roana Carter & husband to Albertina Helmuth, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 24, 1889, $825. (City Hotel property.)

Lot 3: John B. Castle, et al to M. B. Castle, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; also part of section 33, Kendall Township. May 5, 1891.

Lot 3: Emanuel Stein to Columbia Straw Paper Co., part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February, 1893.

Lot 3: Howard J. Black to Philo D. Beard, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February, 1893.

Lot 3: Sheridan Black, et al, to Philo D. Beard, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February, 1893.

Lot 3: May V. Bartlett to Emanuel Stein, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February, 1893.

Lot 3: Philo D. Beard to Columbia Straw Paper Co., part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February, 1893.

Lot 3: Master in Chancery to Nels O. Cassem, Certificate of purchase, City Hotel property, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1894, $2,586.

Lot 3: Olive J. Osmondson, et al, to Randall Cassem, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1906.

Lot 3: Maggie A. Cassem to William T. Boston, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1911, $800.

Lot 3: William T. Boston to Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association, lot 2 and part of lot 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1911, $800.

Lot 3: Knickerbocker Ice Company to Fred G. Young, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and part of northwest quarter section 33, Yorkville, May 1912.

Lot 3: Fred G. Young to Public Service Company, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and part of northwest quarter section 33, Yorkville, May 1912.

Lot 3: Yorkville Industrial Improvement Association to George M. Johnson, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1916, $450.

Lot 3: Rasmussen Motor Co., to Alfred N. Thorsen, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1922, $8,000.

Lot 3: Alfred N. Thorsen and wife, Louisa M., to Jesse Sheer and Charlie Jones, lot 2 and part of lot 2, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1926, $8,500.

Lot 3: Jesse Sheer, et al, to Herman A. Dhuse, lot 2 and 66 feet of the west end of lot 3, north of railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1928, $11,000.

Lot 3: Herman A. Dhuse to M. F. Tillitson, lot 2 and 66 feet of the west end of lot 3, north of the railroad, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1928, $11,000.

 

Nels O. Cassem, 66 feet off of west end of lot 3, block 5, 1899 T-A, $30.

 

Pat Heany, 120 by 60 feet south end of the corner south of the railroad, lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $130.

 

Charles Johnson, part of lot 3, block 5, 1899 T-A, $130.

 

Columbia Straw Company, part of lot 3, block 5, 1899 T-A, $1,600.

 

Columbia Straw Company, part of lot 3, block 5, 1899 T-A, $100.

 

Georgia S. Herrington, 120 by 120 feet southwest corner south of railroad, lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1904 T-A, increased to $300.

 

Kennard Hibbard, 60 by 120 feet south end of the corner south of the railroad, lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $330.

 

Carl Edward Johnson, 60 by 120 feet west of the east 60 feet south of railroad, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $ 330.

 

Georgia S. Herrington, 120 by 120 feet southwest corner south of railroad, lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $750.

 

Kennard Hibbard, 60 by 120 feet south end of the corner south of the railroad, lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $660.

 

Carl Edward Johnson, 60 by 120 feet west of the east 60 feet south of railroad, part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $ 660.

 

Georgia S. Herrington, 120 by 120 feet southwest corner south of railroad, lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,500.

 

 

Public Service Co., north of the C. B. & Q. Railroad, east part of lot 3 including the dam, block 5, 1919 T-A, $1,000.

 

Public Service Co., north of the C. B. & Q. Railroad, east part of lot 3 including the dam, block 5, 1927 T-A, $1,500.

 

Public Service Co., north of the C. B. & Q. Railroad, east part of lot 3 including the dam, block 5, 1931 T-A, $3,000.

 

Street address: West Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description: north of railroad part of lot 3, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and part of northwest quarter section 33-37-7, Yorkville.

 

White Metal Company

Creamery

Condensed Milk Company, Fred G. Young proprietor, (July 1911 – April 1913)

Public Service Company

Yorkville Wood Products Company, Mr. Hoffman proprietor (April 1946 - )

 

The former White Metal works property in Yorkville, but for the past several years operated by different parties as a creamery, has been purchased by Mr. Fred G. Young who now operates a creamery and elevator at Bristol. His business has grown until he cannot fill his orders with his creamery at the station, hence his purchase of the one at Yorkville. He expects to commence operating his new possession next week and will without a doubt make a success of it, as he is a stirring business man.420

 

Fred G. Young, who owns the brick creamery and the Yorkville electric plant, is making improvements that will enable him to get his business consolidated. Workmen are putting large brick additions to the creamery building and when done larger boilers and engines will be installed along with a bigger dynamo, which will run the whole establishment and give him greater power for lighting purposes. He expects to furnish electric power for some of our business people who are using steam engines.421

 

Mr. Fred G. Young hopes to get a big dynamo in place by the first week in February and supply electric light and power to all who want it in Yorkville. Several talk of putting in motors to run machinery and lay aside the steam engines.422

 

There was considerable surprise manifested in Yorkville when it was learned that the electric light plan, creamery and condensing factory, operated and owned by Fred G. Young, had been sold by him to a concern in Chicago.

About seven years ago, Fred Young began condensing mild in a small way at the Bristol Creamery and shipped his product to Chicago. Many smaller firms had done the same thing, but as a general rule they would run a year or so and then fail. Mr. Young stuck with to win and two years later he assumed control of the Yorkville factory and began making shipments of condensed milk form here. His trad increased and he finally became one of five companies which were shipping condensed milk to Chicago, the five being Borden, Oatmen, Cornell, American Milk Product Company and F. G. Young. The American Milk Product Company was one of the largest of the concerns, and Saturday when Mr. Young was in Chicago he made the deal by which this company takes over the property and business of the local plant, including the Bristol factory, for a consideration of about $35,000.

The Yorkville factory has an extensive milk business, it being the most accessible market for dairy products for some distance around. The farmers, especially south and southeast of Yorkville, utilize the Yorkville plant. From twenty to forty thousand pounds of milk are received here in a day, and the daily capacity of the factory is about eight hundred gallons of condensed milk.

Mr. Young is the local manager of the new concern, and he states that there will be change in the operation of the two plants, either in furnishing electric lights and power or in receiving and shipping milk. A bookkeeper will be added to the local force; Miss Grace Williams will soon assume the position.423

 

The Fred G. Young Condensed Milk Company closed its creamery at Yorkville Monday night and will concentrate their efforts on the plant at Aurora. The loss of this business will mean much to Yorkville and it is with regret that the business people see it go. Mr. Young took over the milk business here a number of years ago and made a successful venture of it. He took over several neighboring creameries and after a series of consolidations concentrated his business in Yorkville and Aurora. At the latter place he has one of the most modern condensing plants in the country. From now on Yorkville will be but a shipping point for the big creamery. Howard Shortman, so long connected with the business, will go to Aurora to work but Peter Peterson has not decided on his course. He will be employed for a short time in dismantling the Yorkville plant and disposing of the machinery.424

 

The Public Service Company is cleaning up around their brick building, formerly the White Metal Company’s factory east of town. The cement and brick work which formed the driveway, receiving and curd rooms of the old factory are being torn down by Clifford Shoemaker and Donald Armbruster. This is preparatory to making a large doorway and entrance for the company’s trucks which work will be started in the near future.

This building has quite a history. In the distant past, some thirty or thirty-five years ago a man named Wilder came to Yorkville with a patented process of applying zinc to tin and making it rust proof. It was call white metal and seemed to offer a great business. A stock company was organized in which all the leading business men of town were interested. The building and the large smoke stack, which was the landmark of the neighborhood, was erected and the necessary machinery installed. Manufacturing was started in a small way. George L. Cornell was superintendent. The business never became established and was closed shortly after it began.

Several different projects tried to make use of the building without any success until it was purchased by Fred G. Young as a creamery. It was operated successfully as a creamery for several years. Mr. Young established the electric lighting business and placed the machinery in the east end of the building where it remained until the Public Service Company took over the business.425

 

Mr. Hoffman of the Yorkville Wood Products Company has one of the first products of his newly opened factory on display at the Wright Electric Supply Company.

The product is a “junior trunk” (toy box) a good looking and practical furnishing. Mr. Hoffman needs more help in his plant to put on the coverings of the trunks. If you wish employment, call at the factory.426

 

John L. Healy, to Illinois Sterilized Creamery Company, part section 33, Yorkville, October 1896, $3,000.

 

Illinois Sterilized Cream Company to Fred G. Young, part of section 33-37-7, (Creamery plant), Yorkville, circa 1900, $6,000.

 

Fred G. Young Condensed Milk Company to Public Service Company of Northern Illinois, part of section 33-37-7 Yorkville, May 1912.

 

Second Block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

No lots platted.

Street address: 300 East Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: part of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Street address: 301 East Van Emmon Road.

Legal description: lot 3-8, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

 

Street address: 307 East Van Emmon Road.

Legal description: lot 3-10, block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot is east of Mill Street between East Hydraulic Avenue and East Van Emmon Road.

 

William F. Chapman to John Ryan, southeast corner of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 16, 1872, $450.

John Ryan to Patrick Heany, southeast corner of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 14, 1876, $450.

Elias A. Black & wife to Charles Johnson, part of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 4, 1877, $150.

County Clerk to F. L. Rabe, Tax deed, part of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1901.

Patrick Heaney to Mrs. Mary Kremer, part of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1909.

Mary Kremer to Lawrence “K.” Hibbard, part of block 5, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1911, $800.

K. Hibbard’s property was on the north side of Van Emon Street, the third lot east of Mill Street.

 

Downtown Yorkville

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 202 South Bridge Street

Legal description: lot 1, block 6, except (south) 37 by 80 feet of lot, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the southeast corner of South Bridge Street and East Hydraulic Avenue.

The Fox River House hotel was built on this lot by Urias L. Chappell for John L. Lyon in the fall of 1864.

It was the third oldest building in Yorkville before it was razed to build George M. Dickson’s Insurance and Real Estate offices.

 

Fox River House Hotel & Saloon (1864 - )

Waverly House (August 1865 – September 1865)

W. Weirich Barber & Hairdresser (March 1870 - )

Hocheim Cigar Factory, Louis Hocheim proprietor, in the basement of the building.

Atwater Livery Barn, C. L. Atwater proprietor (July 1894 - )

Spink Shoe Shop, Joseph Spink proprietor (March 1908 – August 1908)

Trager Shoe Repairing, Abe Trager proprietor, (August 1908 – November 1908)

Joseph Stumm Pool Hall ( - March 1928)

Yorkville Bakery: Joseph Safranek proprietor (March 1928 – March 1929)

Kendall County Farm Bureau and Country Companies Insurance offices (March 1929 – January 1938)

Wright Electric Supply & Appliance Store, Mr. and Mrs. ? Wright proprietors (circa 1946 - )

 

The Fox River House was built by John L. Lyon and was the third building constructed in what became downtown Yorkville. The hotel was located on the southeast corner of South Bridge Street and East Hydraulic Avenue just south of the railroad tracks, approximately one block west of the depot. The hotel had eight sleeping rooms upstairs; an office, saloon, and dining facilities downstairs. In its heyday, the Fox River House was the leading hotel in Yorkville.

 

John L. Lyon has begun a 30 by 44 addition to his hotel. It will greatly add to the appearance and usefulness of his house.427

 

When John L. Lyon's wife died, he sold the hotel to a W. S. McFeaters of Pennsylvania.428

 

In August 1865, the name of the Fox River House was changed to the Waverly House. The new landlord added a hall and dining room to the facility to entertain and serve the public.429

 

In September 1865, the Waverly House was sold to Andrew P. Dixon who placed Henry Matlock in charge.

 

In March 1866, Andrew P. Dixon sold the hotel back to Mr. Lyon who resumed the management of the hotel, and its name reverted to Fox River House. John repainted and thoroughly renovated the hotel promising to spare no effort to make it the best hotel in the county.430

 

In March 1870, John L. Lyon sold the hotel to Silas G. Dyer.431 The Fox River House, with Silas G. Dyer proprietor, was described as the leading hotel in Yorkville, with a first rate village tavern.432

 

Advertisement for W. Weirich, barber and hairdresser shop located upstairs on the north end of the Fox River House.433

 

January 1, 1871, Dennis P. Bence, father-in-law of Heman Winchell, became the landlord of the Fox River House.434

 

January 1, 1873, the Fox River house was leased to Ben Harris and Mr. Powars.435 The new proprietors renovated the hotel and put everything in good order. They promised patrons a "good square meal" and a comfortable stay.436,437

 

Over the years the Fox River House experienced frequent physical changes as well as changes in management. In 1874 the dining room was moved to the front of the hotel where the billiard room had been. The old dining room was converted into a billiard parlor and saloon.438

 

In September 1875, Silas G. Dyer sold the Fox River House to David Sinclair. David made a number of improvements in and around the hotel. He moved the livery barn to the back of the lot, and placed it on a new foundation. He constructed a large buggy shed where the livery barn had been for his patron's use.439

 

In 1880, Samuel Whitney was the proprietor of the Fox River House.440

 

In January 1881, David Sinclair rented his farm south of Yorkville and took over the management of the Fox River House.441 The proprietor, David Sinclair, advertised that he would like to inform his friends in the county and elsewhere that he has opened his hotel at Yorkville, and hopes by attention and care to secure a share of the patronage of the traveling public. Anyone wishing a good meal, comfortable bed, and proper care of their teams, etc., will find it to their interest to call and try me. David Sinclair."442 By August 1881, Mr. Sinclair had given up the direct management of the Fox River House but still owned the property.443

 

By November 1881, Jacob Passage was the proprietor of the Fox River House.444

 

In October 1882, Nye La Suer became the proprietor of the Fox River House. When Mr. La Suer became the landlord, the Fox River House was again renovated.445

 

In 1883, Nye LaSuer was replaced by Peter Weiland of Naperville.446

 

In May 1884, Mr. Weiland advertised that the Fox River House at Yorkville had been refitted and put in excellent shape for the accommodation of the public. He stated commercial travelers would find a good room to show their samples, that there were good stables on the premises, and the charges were moderate.447

 

In September 1884, Peter Weiland purchased the Fox River House from David Sinclair for $2500. After purchasing the hotel, he added an addition on the rear of the building.448

 

In April 1889, after owning and operating the hotel for six years, Peter Weiland exchanged the Fox River House for property in Effingham, Illinois, and was succeeded by Fritz Garmes.449

 

This arrangement only lasted for a short time, and Mr. and Mrs. Bonckhe replace Mr. Garmes. The Bonckhes built a sidewalk between the depot and the Fox River House making it easier for railroad passengers to reach the hotel.450

 

By May 1890, the Fox River House was again for sale or rent. It was advertised as an old established hotel that could be profitable.

 

By June 1891, Frank Fasmer of Aurora was the proprietor of the Fox River House.451 By October 1891, The Fasmer family had ceased managing the hotel and left Yorkville. However, the saloon in the hotel was still running.452

 

One of the factors leading to the departure of the Fasmers was the death of Thomas Walker. Mr. Walker was alleged to have been a heavy drinker and was found dead in the yard of his Yorkville home. Mrs. Walker and her daughter, Florence McElwane, blamed the Fasmers for Thomas' death, and filed a suit in the Kendall County Circuit Court against Frank Fasmer for $10,000 damages, for selling liquor to their husband and father.453

 

Mr. C. L. Atwater of Chicago has embarked in the livery business in Yorkville, in the Fox River House barn. He has a number of fine new rigs, which he will let at reasonable prices, and solicits a share of the patronage of Yorkville people who need anything in his line. Farmers and others can have their horses fed at this barn.454

 

Louis Hocheim and family and Bernard Lewis, all of Chicago, were guests of Adam Koos in Yorkville, Sunday. Mr. Hocheim formerly owned and operated a cigar factory in Yorkville in the basement of the Fasmer & Stumm building.455

 

Yorkville has another shoemaker; Joe Spink has opened up a shop in the old Fox River House. He is prepared to do fine work on ladies’ and gents’ shoes, at reasonable prices.456

 

Advertisement for shoe repairing by Abe Trager located in the Fox River House.457

 

Abe Trager moved is shoe repair business from Yorkville to Morris, Illinois. He was the proprietor of a cobbler shop in the Fox River House, following the death of the son of Joseph Spink who formerly operated the establishment.458

 

Joseph Stumm has closed his pool room and the building is being remodeled for Joseph Safranek, Yorkville’s popular baker. The bakery will be moved when the remodeling is completed.459

 

Joseph Safranek, Yorkville’s popular baker, has rented the Stumm building and will move during March. Mr. Stumm expects to go out of business. This location is ideal for a bakery. The ovens will be place on the ground floor in the rear and leave an attractive store on South Bridge Street.460

 

The Yorkville Baker has added a nifty little lunch room to the business on South Bridge Street next to the railroad. It is a nice place to have a light lunch.461

 

The removal of the baker from the Fasmer & Stumm building left a pleasant building vacant. It is said that this will be taken over by the Kendall County Farm Bureau. This rumor has not been confirmed by Farm Advisor Watson, but the transfer is expected. This will leave the offices in the courthouse now occupied by the Bureau for either Miss Payne and the Red Cross and Tubercular Society or the County Superintendent of Schools, Mr. Barron. These offices have been congested in their second floor quarters.462

 

The Kendall County Farm Bureau purchased the building that originally was the Fox River House, a prominent hotel in downtown Yorkville, from Frank Fasmer and his partner Joseph Stumm.

 

The building that housed the Fox River House was eventually sold to the Kendall County Farm Bureau who used the building as their headquarters and offices until they built a new office on Van Emmon Street. When the Farm Bureau offices were moved, the building was sold and used for several businesses including an appliance store, electrical supply store, and paint store. The old wood frame building was eventually removed and replaced by a new brick building used for the George M. Dickson insurance and real estate offices. Later antique and gift store occupied the building.

 

Street address: 206? South Bridge Street

Legal description: 25 by 80 feet of, lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Two-story frame building built for Wellington Mason by Mr. Seaton and Mr. Campbell in 1873.

 

Mason Harness Shop, Wellington & Lew W. Mason proprietors 1869 – July 1904)

Weidner Harness Shop, George W. Weidner proprietor (July 1904 – February 1908)

Mason Harness Shop, Lew W. Mason proprietor (February 1908 – August 1909)

Dunbar Harness Shop, Orrin Dunbar proprietor (August 1909 - )

Larson Harness Shop

Shooting Gallery

Meat Market

Dry Goods Store

McHugh Barber Shop, Newsstand and Tobacco Store, George W. McHugh proprietor ( - February 1925)

Frank F. Weber News Stand, Confectionary, and Justice of the Peace Office, Frank F. Weber proprietor (March 1925 - )

 

Wellington Mason has moved the building formerly occupied by Roy, the baker, on to his lot in Yorkville between the Fox River House Union Block, where he is fitting it up for a harness shop.463

 

Mr. Mason’s new building on South Bridge Street is up and enclosed. It is two stories with a basement. The work done by Messrs. Seaton and Campbell is good and it will have a stylish front.464

 

George McHugh rebuilt the front of the Mason building in May 1901.465

 

Lew W. Mason retires. The Masons have conducted a harness business in Yorkville for nearly forty years. Monday morning, July 25, L. W. Mason turned over his shop and stock of horse goods in Yorkville to Mr. George W. Weidner of Chicago, and Lew is now out of business.

His father, the late Wellington Mason, started the harness business in connection with his tannery here in 1869, and ever since the Masons have been a factor in the business and have conducted a lucrative establishment.

Mr. Weidner, his successor, is an expert in the harness trade, being in Chicago for several years.466

 

One of the harness shops in Yorkville changed hands on the first of February and in the change reverted to the former owner, L. W. Mason, who owns the building just north of the post office. For two or three years the business has been conducted by George W. Weidner, who came here from Chicago and has made many friends in the community. Business however began to slacken with the oncoming financial flurry, and Mr. Weidner started his selling out sale. Nearly everything has been sold out. The business was for sale, but no one seemed to want to buy it, so Mr. Mason the former owner and manager of the business, bought a new stock of goods, new fixtures, etc., and the old patrons now see the familiar figure of “Lew” in his old stand.

Mr. Mason has been in Chicago the past two weeks attending to duties on the federal jury. Mr. Weidner will remain with Mr. Mason and virtually have charge of the business for him.467

 

Orrin Dunbar has purchased the harness business of L. W. Mason and took possession Monday. Orrin has been working in Chicago for some years, but returned to Yorkville after the death of his father to be with his mother. Since that time he has been trying to get into some business in Yorkville with the above result. Patrons of Mr. Mason will be sorry to have him go out of business, as he has ever been a good man to deal with. He will not undertake any business for the present but will take a much needed rest. Mr. Dunbar will carry on the business as nearly like the former as possible and will do all in his power to give satisfaction. He is the son of Mrs. Izilla Dunbar.468

 

Frank F. Weber has purchased the newspaper and magazine business of George McHugh and will take possession about the first of March. Mr. McHugh would like to dispose of his barbering outfit.469

 

Frank F. Weber has moved to his new quarters in the building recently purchased from George McHugh. The former place occupied by Mr. weber has been leased to the Public Service Company and will be used for an office and display room.

The newly finished and cleaned news room is a credit and Mr. Weber is to be congratulated on the change. He will endeavor to fill the vacancy left by the retirement of Mr. McHugh and continue service to his old customers.

It is with a feeling of deep regret that the people of Yorkville mark the retirement of George W. McHugh from the ranks of the Yorkville businessmen. George has been a loyal Yorkville booster since his boyhood. George spent his early manhood in Yorkville learning the printing trade in the Record office. He then left for the west where he spent many years before returning to Yorkville. Upon his return he started the barber shop and notion stand which he has continued until ill health forced his retirement.470

 

Lot 1: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to John L. Lyon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 14, 1863, $500.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon & wife to Alphonse Covel, north half lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 11, 1864, $80.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon to W. S. McFeaters, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 26, 1864, $3,500.

Lot 1: W. S. McFeaters & wife to Andrew P. Dixon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 16, 1865, $2,000.

Lot 1: Andrew P. Dixon to John L. Lyon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 15, 1866, $1,500.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon to John McOmber, (part?) lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 30, 1867, $175.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon & wife to Isaac Crooker & F. M. Hobbs, part lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 30, 1867, $75.

Lot 1: Isaac Crooker & wife to James A. Godard, part lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 25, 1868, $75.

Lot 1: James A. Godard to Chancy Y. Godard, lot 2, and part of lots 1 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 6, 1877, $4,000.

Lot 1: John L. Lyon & wife to Silas G. Dyer, lot 1, and lot 6 (except 37 feet), block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 9, 1870, $5,000.

Lot 1: Heirs of Charles Merrick to Frederick Hage, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 2, 1874, $2,648.75.

Lot 1: Wellington Mason to Orville E. Judson, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 18, 1875, $500.

Lot 1: Silas G. Dyer & wife to David Sinclair, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 30, 1875, $6,000.

Lot 1: David Sinclair to Peter Weiland, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 26, 1884, $2,500.

Lot 1: Peter Weiland to Lizzie Flechmann, lots 1 and 6, block 6 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 20, 1889 $9,000.

Lot 1: Wellington Mason & wife to Lew “Wallace” Mason, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 9, 1892, $1,500.

Lot 1: Lew “Wallace” Mason to George W. McHugh, part of lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1898, $1,500.

Lot 1: Chancy Y. Godard to James A. Godard, part of lots 1, 2 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1898, $3,000.

Lot 1: Lew “Wallace” Mason to John J. Gates, part of lots 1 and 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1914.

Lot 1: George W. McHugh and wife to Frank Weber, (part of?) lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1925, $1,500.

Lot 1: Frank Fasmer and wife to Evelynne Fasmer, part of lot 1, north half of lot 5 and lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1927.

Lot 1: Joseph Stumm, et al to Kendall County Farm Bureau, lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1929.

Roy W. Boston, Receiver, etc., to Yorkville National Bank, deed to part of blocks 6 and 12, Black’s Addition to First Addition to Yorkville, June 1936, $3750.

 

George McHugh, 25 by 80 feet of lot 1, block 6, 1899 T-A, $350.

 

Fasmer & Stumm, lot 1 block 6, except (south?) 37 by 80 feet of lot, 1899 T-A, $500.

 

Frank F. Weber, 25 by 80, lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

Frank F. Weber, 25 by 80 feet north of south 12 feet, lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,000.

 

Fasmer & Stumm, lot 1, block 6, except (south) 37 by 80 feet of lot, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,150.

 

John J. Gates, south 12 by 80 feet of lot 1, and north 9 by 80 foot front of lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $850.

 

John J. Gates Estate, south 12 by 80 feet of lot 1, and north 9 by 80 foot front of lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,700.

 

Kendall County Farm Bureau, North 59 by 80 feet and east 42 by 96 feet, except 10 foot alley, lot 1, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $3,000.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 206? South Bridge Street

Legal address: south 45 feet lot 2 and north 20 feet lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, east side of South Bridge Street, downtown Yorkville.

Union Building constructed by Crooker & Hobbs during the Civil War.

The Union Building was completed in July 1862. It is a two-story brick 40 by 62 feet building. Initially two stores were on the lower floor, which were separated by a broad stairway leading to the hall above them.

 

Quigley & Andrews Dry Goods & Grocery (May 1864 - )

Dixon & Company Hardware & Agricultural Implements & Tin Shop in the south store ( - May 1866

Godard Hardware, Agricultural Implements & Tin Shop, James A. Godard proprietor in the south store (May 1866 - January 1873)

McOmber Dry Goods & Grocery, John McOmber proprietor in the north store (September 1868 - )

Willett & Welch Hardware & Agricultural Implements, Reuben W. Willett & _____ Welch proprietors ( - )

Willett Hardware & Agricultural Implements, Reuben W. Willett proprietor in the south store (January 1873 – June 1894)

Willett & Armbruster Hardware & Agricultural Implements, Reuben W. Willett & Jacob Armstrong proprietors in the south store (June 1894 - 1896)

Armbruster & Needham Hardware & Agricultural Implements, Jacob Armbruster & George L. Needham proprietors in the south store (1896 - December 1912)

Armbruster Hardware, Agricultural Implements & Automobiles, Jacob Armbruster proprietor in the south store (January 1913 – after July 1934)

Howard Drug Store & Yorkville Post Office, George O. Howard proprietor in the north store (October 1876 - )

Yorkville Post Office in the north store (October 1876 - June 1932)

Long Barber Shop, Billy Long proprietor. Shop was in the northwest room of the second floor. (circa 1874-5 – October 1882)

Reddock Barber Shop, John Reddock proprietor on the second floor (October 1882 - )

Dearborn Skating Rink, Paul Dearborn proprietor on the second floor (January 1884 - )

Wait Jewelry, George W. Wait proprietor (February 1890 – August 1893)

Park & Felch Law Firm on the second floor

Masonic Lodge & Order of the Eastern Star on the second floor (September 1934

Yorkville Hardware, Austin Weeks & Joyce Anderson proprietors in the north store

Yorkville Hardware, Austin Weeks proprietor in the north store ( - July 1940)

Yorkville Hardware, Elmer Henker proprietor in the north store (July 1940 - )

Yorkville Sentry Hardware in the north and south store

 

Messrs. Quigley & Andrews have taken the new and elegant store under the Union Hall, and fitted it up in handsome style. The have an entirely new stock of everything in their line of business, dry goods and groceries.471

 

Having purchased of W. Dixon & Company their entire stock of hardware, tin ware, etc., I am now making large additions to the same, and respectfully solicit the patronage of all their old customers, any any new ones who may favor me with a call. I think you will find it to your advantage to continue doing business with the firm. I shall endeavor to keep a good assortment of goods usually found in a hardware store. I will be buying and selling for cash and am prepared to sell goods at the lowest market rates. Signed, James A. Godard.472

 

The well known firm of Dixon & Company, so favorably known in this community, is now no more. They have sold their entire business to Mr. James A. Godard. Mr. Godard is filling up his store with a first class stock of goods, and a good inventory of agricultural implements. Mr. Zohrab Dixon will remain with Mr. Godard and wait on all customers with his usual ability and kindness.

It is with regret that we part with the firm of Dixon & Co., as they have grown up with this place, and were gentlemen of energy and honor. We extend to their successors our best wishes.473

 

Mr. James A. Godard has bought the brick building known as Union Hall, from Crooker & Hobbs, paying $4,000 for the building. Mr. Godard proposes to fit up the hall and put good seats in it.474

 

Mr. Godard, the hardware dealer is putting on an addition to his extensive store in the shape of a machine warehouse. It is to be 25 by 50 feet and used to warehouse all kinds of agricultural implements, from a garden hoe to a threshing machine.475

 

Mr. Godard, the irrepressible, has completed the foundation for the contemplated addition to Union Hall, and the brick walls are soon to go up. The addition is to be used to store agricultural implements and bar iron.476

 

There is a new Store in Godard’s block. The old friends and customers of John McOmber will be glad he has once again embarked in the career of merchant. They will renew the trade he merited so well while in the same business in Bristol. John has a first rate store north of the hardware store. He has been receiving a stock of new dry goods, groceries, trimmings, crockery and a general assortment of notions. He has not received all of his stock yet, but has a sufficient supply to meet his customer’s needs at present. He has engaged Mr. Richard M. Springer as an assistant, and he will be glad to see his friends at the store.477

 

John McOmber, the dry goods dealer, moved across the street this spring to give place to the Kendall County Bank, an institution doing a flourishing business.478

 

Last week, Mr. Reuben W. Willett took charge of the Godard Hardware Store, and J. A. retires to the elevator to push the grain business. Mr. Willett has been for some years in employ of the Boomer Bridge Company and is well qualified for business. He is a careful, methodical ma, and will do his best to make the business as successful in the future as in the past. He will have the assistance of Mr. Dixon in the store.479

 

Having purchased of James A. Godard his entire stock of hardware and agricultural implements, I respectfully invite his old customers, and any new ones to give me their patronage. I intend to retain Mr. Godard’s current employees, increase the inventory and keep on hand a stock of everything that is called for in the hardware line. By keeping the best goods, and selling at lowest living prices, I hope to merit your patronage. Respectfully, R. W. Willett.480

 

Howard Drug Store and the Yorkville post officer were moved to the store in the Union Building north of Reuben W. Willett’s hardware store after a disastrous fire in September 1876, which apparently began in Howard’s drug store and the Yorkville post office across the street on the west side of South Bridge Street.481

 

John E. Reddock’s first barber shop in Yorkville was opened October 17, 1882 in the rooms over the present post-office in the Union Building. Later Mr. Reddock bought the building in which he now has his pleasant home and business. John started barbering in 1875 as an apprentice in the shop he afterwards bought. He then went of Minooka for two years, and Leland for one year before returning to Yorkville.482

 

Dearborn’s skating rink in Union Hall is a grand success. Wednesday evening, the opening night, there was a good crowd present, and a number of Aurora experts came down to show the citizens of Yorkville “how it was done.”483,484,485,486

 

Mr. Willett will occupy the north store in the Union Building as an implement room.487

 

George W. Wait, a jeweler and watch repairer, has located in the post office room in Yorkville and solicits the patronage of the people. This is a branch of business we have long needed. It is hoped Mr. Wait will be sustained. He comes well recommended and has a good stock of watches, clocks, jewelry, etc. for sale.488

 

George W. Wait, who has kept a jewelry shop in the post office for several years, left this morning for Olney, Illinois, where he will engage in the same business. He is a practical repairer and his departure is regretted.489

 

Everyone was surprised to learn that Reuben W. Willett had sold out his share of the hardware store of Willett & Armbruster to George L. Needham. The deal was closed on Monday the 15th. Mr. Willett will be greatly missed, as he has been one of the faithful business men of Yorkville; having been here some twenty-five years. Though we say goodbye to Mr. Willett, we also welcome Mr. Needham in his new business and wish him success.490

 

The firm Armbruster & Needham, who have conducted a hardware business in Yorkville for about sixteen years, will dissolve their partnership January 1, 1913. Mr. Armbruster will continue the business at the present location. Mr. Needham has made no particular plans for the future but it is hoped that he will remain in Yorkville.

These two gentlemen took over the business from Reuben W. Willett with whom Mr. Armbruster had learned the business. Mr. Needham moved in from the farm and his knowledge of implements was of help in the business. These two men have made one of the energetic and wide awake firms of the town and have built up a business that is a credit to their business qualities.491

 

In1876 the post office was located in George O. Howard's drug store on the west side of Bridge Street in the central part of downtown Yorkville. About midnight September 20, a disastrous fire broke out with its origin apparently in the drug store. The drug store and post office as well as Jesse H. Bridgen's dry good store were totally destroyed. Other nearby buildings were saved but incurred some damage.

The next morning a temporary post office was opened across the street in the Kendall County Record office. Mr. Howard ordered a new stock and within a short period of time moved into the northern part of the Union building across the street from the destroyed building. The post office was still located there until June 1932.

 

Frank Wellman has finished painting the front of the Union Building, occupied by Jacob Armbruster and the post office on the main floor and the Masons and Woodmen of the second floor. The new color is a neutral gray with dark green trim. Mr. Armbruster keeps his windows neat with a display of hardware and Postmaster Ohse keeps his part of the building immaculate.492

 

In July 1925, Jacob Armbruster was the local dealer for Dodge automobiles.493

 

The post office has been in the Godard building for about forty-five years. Previous to that it was in the building now occupied by J. C. Hunter Pharmacy and later it was located on the present site of the Farmer’s State Bank of Yorkville. From there it was moved to the Godard Building (Union Hall.)494

The Yorkville Post Office was located in the Godard Building prior to its move to the Cotton Building at 301 South Bridge Street in June 1932.

 

Robert Smith and Gerald Godard are busy removing fixtures and decorations in the old Union Hall, preparing the building for occupancy by the Masons and the Order of the Eastern Star. The Masons and the O.E.S will occupy the entire second floor of the Union Building.495

 

Elmer Henker has purchased the Yorkville Hardware Company from its former proprietor, Austin Weeks. Mr. Henker had been employed at the AAA office in the Farm Bureau Building in Yorkville, and his many friends wish him the success in his new field.

Austin Weeks will work in LaGrange where he has secured a position with Electromotive Corporation, a division of General Motors, which builds railroad equipment and has a contract with the government to build some heavy equipment for the National Defense program.496

 

Lot 2: Elias A. Black & wife to Jacob P. Black, lots 6 and 9, block 1, and part lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1863.

Lot 2: James A. Godard to Chancy Y. Godard, lot 2, and part of lots 1 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 6, 1877, $4,000.

Lot 2: Elias A. Black & wife to Chancy Y. Godard, lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 16, 1884.

Lot 2: Chancy Y. Godard to James A. Godard, part of lots 1, 2 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1898, $3,000.

Lot 1: Lew “Wallace” Mason to John J. Gates, part of lots 1 and 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1914.

 

James A. Godard, south 12 by 80 feet of lot 2, block 6, 1899 T-A, $600.

 

John J. Gates, south 12 by 80 foot lot 1, and north 9 by 80 foot front of lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $850.

 

John J. Gates Estate, south 12 by 80 feet of lot 1, and north 9 by 80 foot front of lot 2, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,700.

 

James A. Godard Estate, south 45 feet lot 2 and north 20 feet lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,800.

 

James A. Godard Estate, south 45 feet lot 2 and north 20 feet lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,600.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: South Bridge Street

Legal description: north 20 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Part of the Union Building is on this lot.

 

Hance the Jeweler, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Hance proprietors (March 1934 -

 

Last month Hance the Jeweler entered upon his sixth year of service in Yorkville. In his first five years here Mr. Hance made a fine record of honest and skilled service to his patrons. Watches have run without missing a tick or the reason found and remedied.

Mr. Hance has a wide selection of gift items, saving many a gray hair for the shopper in finding that particular gift for that particular person.497

 

James A. Godard, north 20 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $180.

 

James A. Godard Estate, south 45 feet lot 2 and north 20 feet lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,800.

 

James A. Godard Estate, south 45 feet lot 2 and north 20 feet lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,600.

 

Street address: 220 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: south 30 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Building was built by Elias A. Black and operated as a Hardware Store.

Also known as the Dolph Building

 

Rapelje Harness Shop, on the second floor (May 1868 – July 1868)

Holland Restaurant, Henry A. Holland proprietor (November 1867 - 1869)

Haigh Brothers Hardware & Implement Company (1869)

McOmber Dry Goods & Grocery, John McOmber proprietor (January 1871 - )

Ender Jeweler (October 1875 - )

Moore & Dolph Meat Market (November 1887 - )

Koos Tailor Shop, Adam Koos proprietor ( - September 1903)

Reddock ? , Miss Reddock proprietor, on the second floor

Hunnewell Bakery, Frank Hunnewell proprietor (May 1908 – September 1908)

Dunbar Millinery Store, Margaret Dunbar proprietor (March 1909 - )

McQuiston Millinery & Accessories Store, on the second floor before she moved across the street to 223 South Bridge Street, Miss Clare McQuiston proprietor

Mewhirter Grocery, George Mewhirter proprietor (February 1906 – December 1906)

Farmers’ State Bank of Yorkville (February 1914 –

Chicago Title Insurance

Fox Valley Coins

Bakery & Coffee Shop

Fox Arcade

Wilder Horse Company

Saint Joseph’s Café, Greg Millen proprietor (operating in April 2000)

Saint Joseph’s Cabinets, Greg Millen proprietor (operating in April 2000)

 

Mr. Henry A. Holland has opened a restaurant in the building next to the printing office. Mr. Holland begs to inform his friends and the public that he will supply them with hot meals at .35 cents each. He will have choice oyster stews, and hot tea and coffee at all hours of the day. He will carry cigars, fine cut and smoking tobacco of all kinds, and a good stock of all kinds of confectionary. Figs, raisins, dates, English currants, crackers, sweet cider, pies and cakes, foreign nut and all kinds of domestic fruits will be carried. The best quality oysters by the can will be sold at wholesale prices. He also carried fresh pork, and beef sausage made daily by W. Cloud, late of Yorkville. Also bologna sausage, dried beef and hams are stocked. Our sausages are made of the best meat and warranted to be clean.498

 

Mr. Rappleje has moved his harness shop into the brick building north of the Record office.499

 

Mr. Rapelje has sold his stock and interest in the harness business to Wellington Mason, who now controls that branch of trade in Yorkville. Mr. Mason has engaged Mr. Rapelje as foreman, and will guarantee the best work and material in everything made at his shop. Mr. Mason promised to give better satisfaction to all in need of harness at lower prices than any other make in the county.500

 

Ender, the watchmaker next door to our office, has been in the business 35 years. He is the same man who worked here eleven years ago.501

 

Moore & Dolph are preparing to occupy the post office building for a meat market. They have improved the premises and will have one of the most complete establishments for their purpose on the Fox River. They have installed a large refrigerator or meat room in the back part of the room of the latest style. The frame building in the back has been raised and a good foundation put under it and the walls newly plastered. It will used for the making of sausage, lard and for storage.502

 

Moore & Dolph will occupy their new meat market next door to the Record office tomorrow. The room has been nicely fitted up and they will keep a generous stock of meats and poultry. Call and see them.503

 

Advertisement for Moore & Dolph Yorkville Market located on South Bridge Street, next door north of the Record office.504

 

Koos, the tailor, has moved his establishment from the Dolph building to the rooms over John Cooper’s harness store near the bridge.505

 

It is now reported that when the first of March comes around, the stock in the Johnson store will be moved across the street to the Dolph building, which will have been bought by that time by Mr. Mewhirter, and the store with fresh goods will be continued.506

 

The Dolph building just north of the Record office has been undergoing a metamorphosis this past week. Two new plate glass windows have been inserted instead of the little panes of glass. The interior has bee repainted and shelves put on the walls, and the store has received a general overhauling. The Johnson stock will be moved over, and Mr. Mewhirter will conduct a store there with his daughter Margaret in charge, on the principle of quick sales and small profits.507

 

George Mewhirter purchased George M. Johnson’s stock when he sold out, and moved the stock across the street into the Dolph Building. The Mewhirter store is being closed and the stock sold to Thomas Anderson. Mr. Anderson operates one of the Cassem farms below Fox. The consideration was a deal in which some western Iowa land owned by Mr. Anderson was traded for the stock and business in Yorkville. The store will be closed out and the stock sold at sacrifice prices.508

 

Mr. Frank Hunnewell of Wisconsin has leased the building north of the Record office now occupied by Miss Reddock, and will open a bakery. He has purchased the tools of Mr. Cotton and expects to be open for business the first of the week.509

 

Yorkville’s new home bakery is becoming popular from the start. Its proprietor and operator, Mr. Hunnewell, has been putting some most excellent goods in the cases and on the shelves and people have been buying in large quantities. His bread, rolls, buns, cakes, cookies and pies are giving satisfaction. His donuts are of a superior quality.

To maintain a home bakery in Yorkville, it must be patronized by Yorkville people. It will take all the buyers in Yorkville to make it a paying institution. Give Mr. Hunnewell your orders and your money.510

 

Frank Hunnewell, who has been running a bake shop in Yorkville for the past three or four months has closed his business and is at home with his mother in Chicago. Patrons of the bakery are sorry indeed to hear of the closing for they had been satisfied with the output and loathe to return to the old methods of buying bread and cakes, sometimes getting fresh and as many times not. The bakery had filled a long felt need in the village and leaves an opening for a progressive baker.

Mr. Hunnewell left Friday noon for Chicago, where he was to meet his nine year old daughter and bring her back to Yorkville for school. Saturday came and he did not return. His daughter arrived on the 10:00 o’clock car and said that Mr. Hunnewell had been taken in ill in Chicago and would not be back to open his business. It is understood that some collections are yet to be made, and some bills to be paid. The exodus of the baker is still considered a trifle mysterious by local businessmen.511

 

It is a pleasure to announce that Yorkville has a millinery store again. It is located in the building north of the Record office. It is hoped the ladies of the village and vicinity will give it sufficient patronage to make it a permanent institution. Miss Margaret Dunbar is in charge. She has experience in this line of business and will do her best to please.512

 

The Mewhirter building, next to the Record office, is about to undergo extensive repairs in preparation for the occupancy of the Farmers’ State Bank of Yorkville, which expects to begin operations there about January 1, 1914. The old frame addition at the rear has been torn down and hauled away and the masons are about to begin their work on the vault.513

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to James A. Godard, north 20 feet, lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 25, 1868, $180.

Lot 3: James A. Godard to Chancy Y. Godard, lot 2, and part of lots 1 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 6, 1877, $4,000.

Lot 3: Heirs of Elias A. Black to Jane Dolph, undivided half of the south 30 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 5, 1887, $1,400.

Lot 3: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Jane Dolph, Administrator’s deed, undivided half interest in the south 30 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 15, 1887, $1,400.

Lot 3: Chancy Y. Godard to James A. Godard, part of lots 1, 2 and 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1898, $3,000.

Lot 3: Jane Dolph to George Mewhirter, south 30 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1907, $1,000.

Lot 3: George Mewhirter to Farmers State Bank, south 30 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1914, $1,900.

 

Mrs. Jane Dolph, south 30 feet of lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $185.

 

James A. Godard Estate, south 45 feet lot 2 and north 20 feet lot 3, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,800.

 

Farmer’s State Bank, south 30 feet lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,250.

 

Farmer’s State Bank, south 30 feet lot 3, block 3, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,500.

 

Lot 4

 

Street address: 222 South Bridge Street.

Legal address: north 26 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Kendall County Record office.

Temporary home of the Yorkville Post Office in 1876.

 

In 1868, a one-story brick building, 22 by 40 feet with a ten foot high ceiling, was built for the Record office on the east side of Bridge Street. The building was built by Samuel Atkinson of Bristol for a little over $800.The original building remains part of the paper’s office today.514

 

John R. Marshall, north 26 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $175.

 

John R. Marshall, north 26 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $530.

 

Hugh R. Marshall Estate, north 26 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,000.

 

Street address: 224 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: middle 25 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Building constructed prior to 1867 by Jacob P. and Elias A. Black.

 

Thompson Tailor Shop, William F. Thompson proprietor (1867 - )

Thompson Candy and Tobacco Store, William F. Thompson proprietor

Thompson Justice of the Peace Office and Court, William F. Thompson Justice of the Peace

Springer & Hilton Restaurant (January 1921 - )

New Radio Store, Clifford Chappell, proprietor (October 1928 - )

Dickson Dental Office, Ivan Dickson, D.D.S.

 

William Remmers has moved his shop from his residence on the hill to Bridge Street, and can now be found with W. F. Thompson, where he will be glad to see his old friends and customers.515

 

William Mohslang arrived in Yorkville Monday night, direct from Germany. Mr. Mohslang is to be the shoe repairer in the Remmers store in Yorkville, and this is his first visit to the United States….. Mr. Mohslang will make his home with Mrs. Remmers and Ernest.516

 

Springer & Hilton will open their new lunch counter in the building formerly occupied by W. F. Thompson, Thursday morning. They will serve short orders and regular meals.517

 

The original building at 224 South Bridge Street was a one-story frame building located between the A. & P. Building and the Kendall County Record office. In April 1932, the building was moved to the Joseph Reinboldt property on the north side, at 101 East Park Street.

 

Work was started last week on a new building between the Record office and the A & P Store. Dr. Ivan Dickson is to occupy the building. He will move his dental offices from the Friedberg building to the new site when the building is completed.518

 

Lot 4: Ralph K. and Helen G. Leitch to Ivan R. Dickson, part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1934.

Lot 4: Grace C. Leitch to Ivan R. Dickson part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1934.

Lot 4: Mary L. Hall to Ivan R. Dickson part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1934.

 

W. F. Thompson, middle 25 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $90.

 

W. F. Thompson, middle 25 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $250.

 

W. F. Thompson, middle 25 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $500.

 

Street address: 226 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: south 29 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

Lot is on the northeast corner of South Bridge Street and East Van Emmon Road on the east side of South Bridge Street.

Hubbard Building constructed for Nelson Hubbard in 1868 and first occupied in January 1869.

 

Nelson Hubbard Furniture and Undertaking, Nelson Hubbard proprietor (January 1869 - February 1886)

Needham Grocery, LeRoy Needham proprietor (November 1871 - )

Healy & Newton Furniture and Undertaking (February 1885 – November 1908)

Holland Restaurant & Oyster Bar, Henry A. Holland proprietor (January 1875 – April 1876)

Hoadley Dental, Dr. G. “Frank” Hoadley, D.D.S., offices on the second floor, (1879 – )

Yorkville’s First High School on the second floor (September 1883 – December 1887)

Tuthill Restaurant, C. L. Tuthill proprietor (November (1900 –

Hipp & Whitney Meat Market, Mr. Hipp & Ralph Whitney, proprietors (February 1903 – April 1903)

Thurber & Harwig Meat Market, Harry Thurber & Nelson Harwig proprietors (May 1903 – June 1903)

Harwig Meat Market, Nelson Harwig proprietor (May 1903 – May 1903)

Foran Meat Market, James Foran proprietor, (May 1903 – June 1903)

Foster Meat Market, Charles Foster proprietor (June 1903 – September 1903)

Skinner Grocery & Dry Goods, Frank Skinner proprietor (September 1903 – April 1909)

Grant & Ohse Grocery & Meat Market, Charles Grant & Fred Ohse proprietors (April 1909 – July 1912)

Ohse Grocery & Meat Market, Fred Ohse proprietor (July 1912 – April 1913)

Grant & Ohse Grocery & Meat Market, Charles Grant & Fred Ohse proprietors (April 1913 – August 1913)

Grant Grocery & Meat Market, Charles Grant proprietor (August 1913 – May 1914)

McDowell Grocery & Meat Market, Oliver A. McDowell proprietor (June 1914 – February 1916)

Hoadley Dental, Dr. Paul L. Hoadley, D.D.S., offices on the second floor, ( - 1921)

Lembke Variety Store (June 1916 – January 1917)

Long Dry Goods & Groceries, W. T. Long proprietor (March 1917- )

Whalen Bowling Alley, P. H. Whalen proprietor (April 1920 – December 1925)

Arundale Pool Room and Soft Drink Bar, Richard “Dick” Arundale proprietor (January 1926 - December 1928)

Lunch Counter in Whalen Bowling Alley, Tom Close proprietor ( - February 1924)

Lunch Counter in Whalen Bowling Alley, John A. Walker proprietor (March 1924 -

Atlantic & Pacific Grocery Store (January 1929 – October 1945)

 

Mr. LeRoy Needham has fitted up a fine room in the basement of Hubbard’s building and will fill it up with a fine stock of choice and fresh groceries of all kinds.519

 

H. A. Holland has opened a restaurant and oyster saloon in the basement of the Hubbard building. Raw oysters 20 cents, stewed oysters 25 cents.520

 

H. A. Holland has removed his grocery and restaurant from Hubbard’s basement to McMurtire’s late stand, second house (business) north of the railway track. He will keep a good line of staple and fancy goods. He will keep all kinds of staple and fancy groceries, all kinds of confectionery, nuts, oranges, lemons and fruit as they come in season. Board by the day; meals 25 cents. He will also carry a good line of ladies notions; fancy chromos, frames, etc.521

 

Nelson Hubbard retires, Healy & Newton purchase Hubbard’s inventory and rent his store.522

 

Healy & Newton have rented the hall over their furniture store, just vacated by the High School, and will use it as a show room for their best furniture, pictures, etc. It is a splendid room for that purpose. This firm now occupies the basement, first and second floors.523

 

Mr. C. L. Tuthill opened a restaurant in the Hubbard building.524

 

A new and up-to-date meat market is now doing business in the Hubbard building on the corner, and it attracts much attention by the fine display of meat and good things in the windows. Hipp and Whitney are the men in control. Mr. Hipp is an Aurora businessman and the partner is Ralph Whitney of Yorkville.525

 

The new meat market in the Hubbard building is no more. Its glory has departed, and the room is vacant. The manager didn’t attend to business in the first place, and in the second, it is pretty hard to buck against the old established market of George Starr. It’s up to Starr & Belden now to keep on doing their best and hold the trade.526

 

The new meat market in the Hubbard building has been reopened by Harry Thurber and Louis Harwig. They are enterprising young men should succeed in the venture.527

 

The new meat market has changed hands again. Last Wednesday a deal was closed where Harry Thurber sold out to Nelson Harwig. A couple of days later, Mr. Harwig sold out to James Foran, the present owner.528

 

The progress of the age has again struck the new meat market and it has changed hands again. Charles Foster of Aurora, who has been cutting meat for James Foran, is now the present proprietor, taking possession last Wednesday.529

 

The Hubbard building store room is being fitted up for the occupancy of Frank Skinner, who is to move his goods over here from the north side.530

 

Frank R. Skinner, who recently moved his stock of merchandise from the north side into the Hubbard building on the south side, now has a typical general supply store and can furnish you with most anything you want. His stock consists of: meats; canned goods; groceries; fruits & oysters; tinware; dry goods; gentlemen’s furnishings; and shoes.

The meats are Armour’s brands exclusively, smoked and fresh. In the front end of the large room is a cigar counter, a candy case and an excellent assortment of toilet soaps. Mr. Skinner is catering also to the younger folks with his supply of school tablets, pens and pencils. Of course the store is full of necessary articles and to fully appreciate the stock you must see it. A genuine popcorn and peanut wagon is run in connection with store and the crisp “fresh-roasted red-hots” can be secured at any time. There is also a lunch counter in the rear where you may get hot coffee, sandwiches, pie and cake.

Mr. Skinner pays the highest price for butter and eggs, cash or trade. He will be glad to show you his stock and feels sure that you will be pleased.531

 

Advertisement for Drs. G. F. Hoadley & Son (Paul L. Hoadley) Dentists.532

 

Robert N. Newton sold his funeral business to O. C. (Oscar C. Knudson.

I have served the people of Yorkville and vicinity in the capacity of an undertaker for 22 years. During the past twelve years, Mr. O. C. Knudson has been closely associated with me and rendered valuable assistance. In leaving Yorkville I desire to thank all my friends who have seen fit to employ me when needing such service. I have now sold my undertaking business to Mr. Knudson, and I wish to recommend him heartily to any and all persons who may have occasion to engage such service. He holds a license as an embalmer issued by the state board of health, and I consider him capable in every way to perform these last sad duties. I trust he may enjoy the confidence of the people in this capacity in the future as I have in the past. Very sincerely, Robert N. Newton.533

 

Charles Grant & Fred Ohse have bought the store formerly occupied by Frank R. Skinner and took possession Tuesday night. They will put in a new stock of groceries and will continue to handle Armour’s meats. In addition they will run a lunch counter in connection with the store. The senior member of the firm has had some years of experience in the butcher business in Aurora and is a brother-in-law of Fred Ohse, the junior partner, who is well known in Yorkville. The boys intend to run a high-class store and solicit your patronage.534

 

The building formerly occupied by the Yorkville National Bank has been purchased by Nelson T. Morley, on whose land it now stands. Mr. Morley has leased it to the A. E. & C. railroad, which will use it as a waiting room. Mr. Morley has ordered a new metal roof for the building, which will add much to its fireproof qualities. Then there will be a cement foundation and the building will be plastered and papered inside.535

 

It is probable that there will be a firm change in Yorkville the first of the month that will affect two of our business places. Charles Grant of Grant & Ohse Grocery & Meat Market will sell out to Will Ohse. Mr. Grant will then join his brother F. H. Grant, in the garage, where they will develop a first-class machine shop. They expect to put in a lathe and drill press and be able to handle all kinds of fine machine repairing. This change is in the wind and, though the deal is not wholly completed, it is thought that there is no doubt of its consummation.536

 

Charles Grant has returned to the grocery and meat business with Fred Ohse and from now on the firm will be known as Grant & Ohse as it was formerly. They will carry meats and groceries in connection with the lunch counter. Mr. Grant will continue to a member of the firm operating the garage but he active work will be in the hands of his brother Frank.537

 

Announcement that the firm of Grant & Ohse will dissolve their partnership, August 31, 1913, and Charles Grant will continue the business and will carry a full line of groceries and meats in connection with the lunch counter.538

 

Oliver McDowell, formerly of the firm of McDowell & Curran, Bristol, has bought the business of Charles Grant at Yorkville, and has taken possession. For the present, he will continue to run the lunch stand, butcher shop and grocery as Mr. Grant has done. The new owner has had experience in the business and should make a success of the new stand. Mr. Grant has made no plans for the future and it is hoped he will not decide to leave Yorkville.539

 

Having purchased the lunch room of Oliver McDowell, I am ready to serve regular meals and short orders at all hours. Table and counter service is available. I will continue to handle high grade groceries. Herman H. Wollenweber.540

Mr. Wollenweber purchased the lunch counter aspect of Mr. McDowell’s business and moved it to his store in the Cotton Building across the street. Mr. McDowell continued the grocery and meat business in his original location in the Hubbard building.

 

After selling his lunch county business, Oliver A. McDowell, rearranging and decorated his store. His reason for selling the restaurant business was he found he could not give satisfactory service in so many departments and he proposes to devote his entire time to the grocery and meat market.541

 

Henry J. C. Lembke has rented the Hubbard store on the corner and will conduct a variety store.542

 

W. T. Long, who purchased the Variety Store from Mrs. Lembke, expects to open the business to the public on March 1, 1917. The store building has been completely remodeled since the fire and is filled with new goods throughout. Frank R. Skinner and son Fred have spent the past ten days in painting and refitting the place, and it now looks like a new building.

Mr. Long will handle a general line of dry goods, groceries and notions, on a strictly cash basis. He comes here from De Kalb, where he has been in business of this description for a number of years.543

 

Winfield Arundale was employed at the P. F. Whalen bowling alley, the past two weeks, taking the place of Henry Briscoe, who was on his vacation.544

 

Dr. Paul L. Hoadley will move his dental offices from the location in the Whalen building to the neat little building recently occupied by the Mewhirters on the way up the hill. This will make ideal quarters for the dentist. It is with some regret that the move is made as Dr. Hoadley’s father, the late G. F. Hoadley located in the present offices forty-one years ago. The move was made necessary by the fact that Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Whalen will make the second floor of the building into a flat where they and their children will make their home. They were forced to do this by the scarcity of homes in Yorkville.545

 

Pat Whalen has sold his soft drink and bowling business to Richard Arundale, who took possession Monday morning. Mr. Whalen came to Yorkville six years ago and bought the Hubbard Building. He remodeled the building and opened a soft drink parlor on the main floor with a modern apartment upstairs.546

 

Richard “Dick” Arundale will move his pool room and soft drink bar from the building on the corner in the one vacated by “Jack” Quinsey. What will be the future of the building on the corner, which is owned by Pat Whalen of Morris, has not been announced.547

 

Dick Arundale has moved his pool room to the new quarters north of the post office. This building was recently vacated by John Quinsey who went into the building on Hydraulic Avenue. The new place into which Dick has moved has been decorated by Frank Skinner and is a credit to the decorator. Who will move into the Whalen building left empty by Arundale’s move is unknown. The place is rented and will be placed in readiness for its new occupant.548

 

The opening of the new Atlantic & Pacific store in Yorkville, Saturday was a great success from a business standpoint. E. F. VonBlaricom, of De Kalb will have charge of the Yorkville store and will move here as soon as his plans are completed. He is assisted by Lee Richardson who already is here.549

 

Manager Richard Larsen announces that the Yorkville A. & P. Grocery Store will close, permanently, this Saturday evening, October 20.550

 

Lot 4: Jacob P. Black & wife to Elias A. Black, middle part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 30, $400.

Lot 4: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to John R. Marshall, north 25 feet lot 1, block 4, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 12, 1866, $150.

Lot 4: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Nelson Hubbard, south part lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 11, 1868, $800.

Lot 4: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Nelson Hubbard, south part lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 10, 1868, $300.

Lot 4: Nelson Hubbard & wife to LeRoy J. Needham, Sr., undivided half interest in the south part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 25, 1871, $2,000.

Lot 4: Nelson Hubbard & wife to Joab Austin, south part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 15, 1873, $2,000.

Lot 4: Mary N. Hubbard, widow to Nelson T. Morley, south part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1919.

Lot 4: Nelson T. Morley to Patrick F. Whalen, south part of lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1920, $3,000.

Lot 4: Patrick F. and Elizabeth Mary Whalen, his wife to Irvin L. Kay, lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1934.

Lot 4: Irvin L. Kay, bachelor to Patrick F. and Elizabeth Mary Whalen, lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1934.

 

Nelson Hubbard, south 29 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $440.

 

Patrick F. Whalen, south 29 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,450.

 

Patrick F. Whalen, south 29 feet lot 4, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $3,100.

 

Lot 5

 

Street address: 109 East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Additionto Yorkville.

 

Kahle Tavern, William Kahle proprietor

 

Street address: 111 East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Additionto Yorkville.

 

There were two wood frame buildings between the Hubbard Building and the Kendall County Farm Bureau offices on East Van Emmon Street. In February 1964, the Farmers State Bank of Yorkville purchased both buildings and razed them to use the property for a parking lot.

 

Yorkville Cheese Factory, H. F. Wood proprietor (May 1878 - )

Markel Blacksmith & Wagon Shop, Joseph Markel proprietor (March 1889 - )

Gargrave Blacksmith Shop, Amos Gargrave proprietor (

Yorkville Creamery, Tom Close proprietor ( - February 1924)

Yorkville Creamery, John A. Walker proprietor (March 1924 - )

Bright Spot Café, Nicholas and Georgiana Moisa proprietors (Circa 1946 - )

The building that housed the first Bright Spot Café was razed in 1964.

 

The new cheese factory if ready for business and Mr. Wood expects to start up this morning. The factory is supplied with all the latest and best improved appliances for handling the milk and making the cheese. With Mr. Wood’s reputation, we expect Yorkville cheese will soon take the lead in the market. We hope the farmers and dairymen in this locality will patronize the factory, and help make this a permanent institution, and a success in every particular.551

 

Our cheese house is just back of Hubbard’s building, on East Van Emmon Street. It is a modest two-story building, with an annex containing a twelve-horse boiler The internal machinery is simple but adequate, consisting of a set of Fairbanks scales on the platform where the milk is received, a large rectangular tin-lined vat to receive and turn the milk, a smaller vat in which to dry and salt the curd, cheese presses, etc.

The gentleman running the factory is Mr. H. F. Wood, who learned the business in a large cheese factory at Elgin, and for nearly five years conducted the Plano cheese factory. He is assisted by Mr. Lawrence Hafenrichter, of Oswego, a most excellent young man. Both men have the vim and energy to conduct a business successfully. Mr. Wood expects to install machinery for making butter this fall.552

 

Our new neighbor on East Van Emmon Street, Joseph Markel, seems to be full of business since he fitted up the old cheese factory as a blacksmith and wagon shop. He has built a shed at the rear for a steam engine, and has room enough to do a big business.553

 

Workmen began to tear down the old cheese factory/blacksmith shop west of the feed mill Tuesday. It has had its day.554

 

John A. Walker has purchased the Yorkville Creamery business from Tom Close and will continue to ship to the Beatrice Creamery Company. This company has been successful in building up a large business in this community and Mr. Walker asks your further patronage. He will also run the lunch counter in the Whalen bowling alley room as did Mr. Close.555

 

Tom Close who came here to take charge of the business of the Yorkville Creamery Company has returned to Chicago. Mr. Close made many friends during his stay in Yorkville. He sold his lunch stand to John A. Walker.556

 

Initially, the Bright Spot Café was in a small wooden structure between the alley behind the Hubbard Building and the Farm Bureau Building on East Van Emmon Street.557

 

Lot 5: Elias A. Black & wife to Louisa Black, south half lot 5, and lot part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 15, 1877, $237.50.

Lot 5: George M. Hollenback, Executor, to Elias A. Black, west half of lot 5, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 23, 1885.

Lot 5: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Flora A. Weaver, part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1900, $500.

Lot 5: Flora A Weaver to Lorenzo Stansel, part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1901, $225.

Lot 5: Flora E. Weaver to Kendall County Farm Bureau, south half of lots 5 and 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1920, $2,000.

Lot 5: Frank Fasmer and wife to Evelynne Fasmer, part of lot 1, north half of lot 5 and lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1927.

Lot 5: Kendall County Farm Bureau to Justus Nading, south half lot 5, and part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1927.

 

Flora Weaver, south half of lot 5 and part of the southwest quarter of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $484.

 

Kendall County Farm Bureau, south half lot 5, and part of the southwest quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $600.

 

Fasmer & Stumm, north half lot 5 and all of lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $50.

 

Kendall County Farm Bureau, north half lot 5 and all of lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $100.

 

 

Lot 6

 

Faces East Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Lot 6: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to John L. Lyon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 14, 1863, $500.

Lot 6: John L. Lyon & wife to Alphonse Covel, north half lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 11, 1864, $80.

Lot 6: John L. Lyon to W. S. McFeaters, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 26, 1864, $3,500.

Lot 6: W. S. McFeaters & wife to Andrew P. Dixon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 16, 1865, $2,000.

Lot 6: Andrew P. Dixon to John L. Lyon, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 15, 1866, $1,500.

Lot 6: John L. Lyon & wife to Silas G. Dyer, lot 1, and lot 6 (except 37 feet), block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 9, 1870, $5,000.

Lot 6: Silas G. Dyer & wife to David Sinclair, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 30, 1875, $6,000.

Lot 6: David Sinclair to Peter Weiland, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 26, 1884, $2,500.

Lot 6: Peter Weiland to Lizzie Flechmann, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 20, 1889 $9,000.

Lot 6: Lizzie Flechmann to Frank Fasmer, et al, lots 1 and 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1895, $1,000.

Lot 6: Master in Chancery to William R. Newton, southeast quarter of lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1903, $201.

Lot 6: Frank Fasmer and wife to Evelynne Fasmer, part of lot 1, north half of lot 5 and lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1927.

 

Fasmer & Stumm, north half lot 5 and all of lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $50.

 

Kendall County Farm Bureau, north half lot 5 and all of lot 6, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $100.

 

 

Lot 7

 

Street address: 113 East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: south half lot 5, and part of the southwest quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Building built to house Kendall County Farm Bureau offices.

 

Gargrave Blacksmith Shop, Amos Gargrave proprietor

Chappell Carpenter Shop, Henry Chappell proprietor

Weber Feed Mill, Charles Weber proprietor (March 1883 - )

Weaver Feed & Coal, Frank Weaver proprietor

Rarick Feed & Coal, Mrs. Rarick proprietor

Hinckley Feed Barn, Marvin A. Hinckley proprietor ( - September 1927)

Dr. Frank G. Loomis, D.V.M. (January 1924 - )

Livestock Sale Barn, Kendall County Farm Bureau proprietor (September 1920 – October 1927)

Kendall County Farm Bureau (January 1932 - )

Farmers Oil Company Service Station (May 1939 - )

 

About 2:30 Sunday afternoon an alarm of fire was sounded in Yorkville and a blaze was soon discovered coming from the east side of Charles Weber’s feed mill on East Van Emmon Street. …. The mill is a regular tinder box of dry boards and timbers. The flames soon mounted to the roof, where they were combated with a single stream of water. It is to the credit of the firemen that they prevented the entire destruction of the building; the upper story was burned, but the lower story and machinery were saved.

It is a heavy loss to Mr. Weber, as he has no insurance and had just got the mill in working order again. The fire started near the boiler and spread from there.558

 

The Yorkville Feed Mill will be ready for business Saturday, and Mr. Weber hopes the farmers within the reach of Yorkville will give him a call and their patronage.

It will be remembered that some weeks ago Mr. Weber’s mill was destroyed by fire and much of the machinery ruined. It seemed as if the whole thing had gone up, but Charley had many friends who gave him a lift financially, and he went to work in rain and snow and ice to clean up the old place, rebuild the upper story, and put in another and larger boiler. Now he has the mill running again. Mr. Weber deserved the assistance of those who hqve feed ground because of his perseverance in rebuilding.559

 

The Gargrave blacksmith shop and Chappell’s carpenter shop have been raised to grade on East Van Emmon Street, and soon the new culvert will be in proper shape again.560

These buildings were on the north side of East Van Emmon Street approximately where the Kendall County Farm Bureau offices were built.

 

Amos Gargrave has vacated his blacksmith shop in Yorkville and has rented a place in Oswego, where he will carry on the business. Amos knows how to shoe horses.561

 

The Gargrave blacksmith shop has been taken down, and there is now a big vacant lot. It would make a nice place for a business along the trolley line.562

 

Dr. Frank G. Loomis, D. V. M., has located in Yorkville and will be ready for business on and after Monday, January 28, at his office in the Marvin A. Hinckley offices on the north side of East Van Emmon Street midway between South Bridge Street and Heustis Street. The new veterinarian is a graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, and has had practice at Columbus, Ohio, and Chicago.563

 

Justus Nading has bought the property on East Van Emmon Street were Marvin A. Hinckley has his feed barn and will clean off the buildings with the exception of the west end of the barn. George Mewhirter has bought the lumber and is now razing the old mill and barn. Mr. Hinckley is planning to move into the building just east which belongs to the Lorenzo Stanzel Estate. This cleanup will make a wonderful improvement in the looks of the street since the old shacks were in such a poor state of repair they looked like they might tumbledown any moment.

The front part of the old mill itself is an old landmark. Originally it was a grist mill operated by Charley Weber, now of Oswego. It then passed into the hands of Frank Weaver who had a coal and feed business in it. He was followed by Mrs. Rarick who operated the business for several years and then leased to Mr. Hinckley. During his occupancy, the place was sold to the Kendall County Farm Bureau and a large part of the barn space was used as a sales barn. The intention of Mr. Nading is to make the property more attractive and prepare for future needs for building purposes.564

No doubt Mr. Nading’s desire to clean up the property was influenced by the fact that the Nading home was on the crest of the hill, on the south side of East Van Emmon Street, overlooking the property purchased.

 

The Farm Bureau directors have approved the sale of the sale barn and lots owned by the Farm Bureau in Yorkville. The purchaser, George Mewhirter, of Yorkville, paid the Farm Bureau $2,000 for the property. This amount is what the Farm Bureau paid Flora E. Weaver for this real estate September 14, 1920….

Owing to the big drop in the purebred livestock business, the barn was never used for many sales, and the income received from this investment was never enough to make it a very desirable property to own.565

 

The oil and gasoline company founded by the Kendall County Farm Bureau will be completed in Yorkville in a short time. Through the efforts of Malcolm Watson, the farm advisor, and a few local citizens, the Burlington Railroad was persuaded that the county seat is the place for the station. Mr. Carter, the division superintendent, saw the light quickly after Mr. Watson explained conditions and Yorkville will be the central point of distribution. Al Leach (F. A. Leach), who has been manager of the local Standard Oil Company station, will be the local manager of the new company.566

 

The Kendall County Farm Bureau is moving into its new quarters on East Van Emmon Street today. The new arrangement will make it possible for all Farm Bureau interests to be housed under one roof including the cold storage locker program, the insurance department, the Agricultural Conservation Association and the Farm Bureau itself.567

 

The Farmers Oil Company has been bitten by the building bug too. Contractor Ira Perkins is erecting a new service station for them just east of the Farm Bureau Building on East Van Emmon Street. The building is set back from the street quite a distance to allow for the service of customers from the gas pumps. At present the foundation and fill are in and work will begin soon on the building proper.568

 

Lot 7: Elias A. Black & wife to Louisa Black, south half lot 5, and lot part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 15, 1877, $237.50.

Lot 7: Flora E. Weaver to Kendall County Farm Bureau, south half of lot 5, and part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1920, $2,000.

Lot 7: Kendall County Farm Bureau to Justus Nading, south half lot 5, and part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1927.

Lot 7: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Flora A. Weaver, part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1900, $500.

Lot 7: Flora A Weaver to Lorenzo Stansel, part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1901, $225.

Lot 7: Flora E. Weaver to Kendall County Farm Bureau, south half of lots 5 and 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1920, $2,000.

Lot 7: Kendall County Farm Bureau to Justus Nading, south half lot 5, and part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1927.

Lot 7: Justus Nading to Kendall Farmer’s Oil Co., part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1938.

Lot 7: ? N. Pritchard, et al to Kendall Farmer’s Oil Co., part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1938.

 

Flora Weaver, south half of lot 5 and part of the southwest quarter of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $484.

 

Street address: unknown East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: 50 feet of the southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Hinckley Feed Barn, Marvin A. Hinckley proprietor (September 1927 - )

Breese Garage, LaRue Breese proprietor (January 1928 - )

 

It is probable that there will be a firm change in Yorkville the first of the month that will affect two of our business places. Charles Grant of Grant & Ohse Grocery & Meat Market will sell out to Will Ohse. Mr. Grant will then join his brother F. H. Grant, in the garage, where they will develop a first-class machine shop. They expect to put in a lathe and drill press and be able to handle all kinds of fine machine repairing. This change is in the wind and, though the deal is not wholly completed, it is thought that there is no doubt of its consummation.569

 

Charles Grant has returned to the grocery and meat business with Fred Ohse and from now on the firm will be known as Grant & Ohse as it was formerly. They will carry meats and groceries in connection with the lunch counter. Mr. Grant will continue to a member of the firm operating the garage but he active work will be in the hands of his brother Frank.570

 

Justus Nading has bought the property on East Van Emmon Street were Marvin A. Hinckley has his feed barn and will clean off the buildings with the exception of the west end of the barn. George Mewhirter has bought the lumber and is now razing the old mill and barn. Mr. Hinckley is planning to move into the building just east which belongs to the Lorenzo Stanzel Estate. 571

 

LaRue Breese, who has been associated with the Hayden Garage for the past five years, has started a tractor and automobile repair business of his own in the Stansel building west of Veterinarian Dr. Roy F. Hoadley’s office.572

 

Lorenzo Stansel, 50 feet of the southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $270.

 

 

Street address: ? East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: west part of southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. Also described as: south 50 feet by 100 feet west of the east 108 feet, south east corner of the southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Cement block building was built in 1913.

 

Lamp Blacksmith Shop, John H. Lamp proprietor (September 1912 – February 1919)

 

The new building on East Van Emmon Street east of the Grant Garage has been made to put on a substantial appearance. The walls are of concrete blocks, complying with the ordinance about building within the fire limits of the village. It is to the credit of the village board that it insisted on the fireproof material. There should be no more frame or wooden buildings permitted within the boundary. Mr. Lamp will have a blacksmith and general purpose shop that is a credit to Yorkville.573

 

Lot 7: William R. Newton to John H. Lamp, west part of southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1912, $500.

Lot 7: John H. Lamp to Roy F. Hoadley, west part of southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1919, $1,000.

 

Roy F. Hoadley, south 50 feet by 100 feet west of the east 108 feet, south east corner of the southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $750.

 

Street address: 135 East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: south 100 feet and east 108 feet of the southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Building built in 1916 by contractor Clarence Shaw for Charles W. Hemm who rented the property to the Valley Garage Corporation.

Building was dedicated June 2, 1916.

 

Valley Garage, Fred L. Wright, Martin Hauge, William E. Hayden, and Charles A. Bogardus proprietors (June 1916 - )

Hayden Garage Chevrolet & Buick agency in 1932

Mackie Music

Association for Individual Development (AID)

Sawmill Pizza & Family Fun Center

 

A new cement garage building 60 by 90 feet, will be started on the lot at the northwest corner of East Van Emmon and Heustis Streets, Yorkville, at once. The building will have a main show room and storage floor on a level with East Van Emmon Street, and the basement, which will be the repair department, will have entrances at the back and side. Charles W. Hemm is building this garage and it will be occupied by the Valley Garage Corporation. They will carry their Ford line and also operate a service station for the Reo, of which Mr. Hemm is the agent.574

 

Advertisement for 1916 Reo automobiles by Charles W. Hemm and Valley Garage Corporation Yorkville and Oswego.575

 

Advertisement for 1916 Chevrolet automobiles, by Fred Schale agent, service station Valley Garage Corporation.576

 

Work has begun on the new garage and it is thought that the building will be ready for occupancy early in the summer. The excavation of the basement has been started and most of the vitrified tiles, supplied by Jay Widney, are on the ground. Work will be rushed by Mr. Hemm, who is putting up the building, and Clarence Shaw, the contractor, promises to lose no time. This will a much needed building and will offer a refuge to many tourists who seek a modern garage for repairs.577

 

Advertisement for an open house and part at the opening of the Valley Garage Corporation’s new building. Opening next week to handle your repair work; Ford cars, the universal car on display and ready for immediate delivery. Complete stock of repairs for this reliable car. Service station for Reo, Chevrolet and Jackson cars. The new building will be dedicated Friday evening June 2 with a benefit dance for the Yorkville baseball team. Music by Godard’s Orchestra. Tickets $1.00. Come out and enjoy yourself. The Valley Garage Corporation.578

 

Charles W. Hemm has improved his property occupied by the Valley Garage Corporation. New retaining walls have bee made on the sides and in front. Black dirt is ready to be planted to grass next spring. When the new culvert is put in and the cross walk completed, the garage corner will be attractive.579

 

In November 1917, the Ford automobile agency was give to Mr. Cline Bagwell.580

 

Advertisement for Ford the universal car, Cline Bagwell Auto Company, Yorkville, Illinois, sales and service station at the Valley Garage.581

 

The Valley Garage Corporation and Hemm & Zeiter have consolidated their business under the name of the Valley Garage Corporation. The enlisting of Fred Wideman, who expects to enter officer’s training school at Camp Grant about November 15, caused a shakeup in the business. The Valley Garage Corporation bought the business of Hemm & Zeiter, and consolidated the garage and automobile business with the implement business and intend to make things hum. Charles W. Hemm was elected president, Jacob Zeiter, vice-president, and George Barkley, secretary and manager, at the November 1, meeting. The headquarters of the business will be at the garage.582

 

A fire in the Valley Garage damaged 21 automobiles for an estimated loss of $20,000 to $25,000.583

 

William E. Hayden has taken over the repair department of the Valley Garage Corporation and will hereafter run it himself. Hayden is known around the country as one of the ablest mechanics in the business. Henry J. Wittrup has the office end of the business and handles the accessories. George Barkley will have his entire attention to give to the sales end of the business. C. E. Hemm and Jacob Zeiter will give the most of the attention to the implement business.584

 

The Valley Garage was the scene of another fire. The Bristol Chemical Truck Company answered a call at 3:20 Wednesday morning at the Valley Garage. The building had caught fire from the chimney and was eating its way along the floor joists in the basement. Jones and Hutchinson who were sleeping in the office were awakened by the smoke filling the room. They immediately turned in an alarm and the Bristol Company responded. Both upstairs and downstairs were filled with dense smoke when the firemen arrived. Jones had the flames subdued with hand chemicals but fire still remained in the joists and cracks. More hand tanks were used, but not having sufficient force to drive the liquid into the fire, one of the big tanks of the truck was turned on and the beams drenched under 200 pounds pressure to make the situation safe.

This is the second fire in the history of the garage, and only its early discovery saved the entire building and contents from destruction.585

 

In July 1925, the Valley Garage Corporation was the local Buick Motor Company dealer.586

 

William E. Hayden and Charles Schumacher have taken over the business of the Valley Garage since the business went into the hands of a receiver last week. Both these men are well equipped for their duties. Hayden is one of the best repair men in the country and Schumacher has had a lot to do with the sales and accessories for a number of years. They are anxious to retain all the customers of the former business and will welcome any new ones.

LaRue Breese, who has been associated with the Hayden Garage for the past five years, has started a tractor and automobile repair business of his own in the Stansel building west of Veterinarian Dr. Roy F. Hoadley’s office.587

 

Lot 7: William R. Newton to Charles W. Hemm, part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1916, $550.

Lot 7: Charles W. Hemm, by Administration to Charles W. Schumacher, et al Administrator’s deed part lot 7 in block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1937,

 

Charles W. Hemm, south 100 feet and east 108 feet of the southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $1,034.

 

Street address: 227 Heustis Street

Legal description: southeast quarter of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Street address is for the lower level of 135 East Van Emmon Street.

 

Sawmill Pizza & Family Fun Center

 

Street address: ? East Van Emmon Street

Legal description: part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Additionto Yorkville.

 

LaRue Breese, who has been associated with the Hayden Garage for the past five years, has started a tractor and automobile repair business of his own in the Stansel building west of Veterinarian Dr. Roy F. Hoadley’s office.588

 

Lot 7: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Jeter & Boston, undivided half part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 29, 1889, $150.

Lot 7: M. Adele Kremer & husband to Jeter & Boston, undivided half interest in part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 21, 1889, $150.

Above two equals transactions pertain to the south half of the northwest quarter of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 7: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to M. Adelle Kremer, undivided half of part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1901, $100.

Lot 7: M. Adele Kremer to M. Louise Newton, undivided half interest in part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1906.

 

Lot 7: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Flora A. Weaver, part of lots 5 and 7, in block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1900, $500.

Lot 7: Flora A Weaver to Lorenzo Stansel, part of block 6, (part of lot 5 and lot 7?), Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1901, $225.

Lot 7: Mary E. Hemm to Charles W. Schumacher, et al part of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville,

south 100 feet by east 108 feet of southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1938.

 

Jacob P. and Elias A. Black, southeast quarter of lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $60.

 

Jeter & Boston, south half northwest quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $40.

 

Jeter & Boston, south half northwest quarter and south half northeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $100.

 

Jeter & Boston, south half northwest quarter and south half northeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $200.

 

Kendall County Farm Bureau, south half lot 5, and part of the southwest quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $600.

 

Justus Nading, south half lot 5, and west part of the southwest quarter east of lot on Van Emmon Street, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $800.

 

Annie L. Clayton, 50 feet of southeast corner, southwest quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $360.

 

Annie L. Clayton, 115 feet east of lot 5, 50 by 50 feet on Van Emmon Street, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $720.

 

W. R. Newton, 40 by 158 feet, north part southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1917 T-A, increased to $19.

 

W. R. Newton, 40 by 158 feet north part southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $30.

 

W. R. Newton, 40 by 158 feet north part southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $60.

 

Charles W. Hemm, south 100 feet by east 108 feet of southeast quarter lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 191 T-A, increased to $1,034.

 

Charles W. Hemm, south 100 feet by east 108 feet on Van Emmon Street southeast quarter by 100 feet on Heustis Street, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,660.

 

Charles W. Hemm, south 100 feet by east 108 feet on Van Emmon Street southeast quarter by 100 feet on Heustis Street, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $3,320.

 

Lorenzo Stanzel, south 100 feet by 50 feet southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1904 T-A, increased to $50.

 

Roy F. Hoadley, south 100 feet by 50 feet west of east 108 feet, southeast corner southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $380.

 

Roy F. Hoadley, south 100 feet by 50 feet west of east 108 feet, southeast corner southeast quarter, lot 7, block 6, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $750.

 

Block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Between the railroad and the river, west of West Ridge Street.

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 109 South Bridge Street

Legal description: lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the northwest corner of South Bridge Street and West Hydraulic Avenue, on the west side of South Bridge Street.

 

The fifth building built in downtown Yorkville was a frame building on the site of the Hotel Nading operated by Willis Atkins as a shoe shop. Justus Nading razed the wooden structure to build a brick building in 1890.

The Nading Hotel was located on lot 1, and the south half of lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville. Building was located on the northwest corner of South Bridge Street and West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Lozier Restaurant, Bakery & Hotel, Ira Lozier proprietor ( - March 1884)

Lockwood Jeweler (May 1881 - )

Nading Bakery Restaurant & Hotel (March 1884 – December 1884)

Morley Merchant Tailor, Thomas C. Morley proprietor (circa 1860 – November 1868.

McMurtrie Merchant Tailor, John McMurtrie proprietor (1869 – after 1882)

Atkins Shoe Shop, Willis Atkins proprietor ( - November 1866)

Puderbaugh Shoe Shop, William Puderbaugh proprietor (November 1866 - )

Nading Hotel Justus Nading proprietor (March 1884 – December 1884)

Nading Bakery, Restaurant & Hotel, Justus Nading proprietor (March 1885 - )

Yorkville Telephone Company, Justus Nading proprietor & then manager

Yorkville Hotel

Illinois Bell Telephone Company (May 1939 –

Old Age Assistance Office, located at the rear of the main floor of the Yorkville Hotel, with an entrance on the south side of the building.

Prim Beauty Shop, located at the rear of the main floor of the Yorkville Hotel, with an entrance on the south side of the building. (September 1944 - )

Bright Spot Restaurant

 

Mr. Lockwood has opened a shop in Lozier’s Restaurant window, where he will do all kinds of watch repairing, cleaning, etc. He will also repair jewelry. Work is solicited and satisfaction guaranteed in all cases.589

 

Mr. Willis Atkins has sold his stock and interest in the boot and shoe trade to Mr. William A. Puderbaugh, who will carry on the business in all its branches. Custom work of all kinds will be done in the best manner. A good stock of Chicago made stock will be kept on hand and will be sold at low prices. Call and see the new proprietor and leave your measure for a pair of books or shoes, and he will guarantee your satisfaction.590

 

In November 1868, Thomas C. Morley moved his tailor shop and ready made clothing store to the Springer & Morley building in the 200 block of South Bridge Street.

 

In 1870, Willis Atkin’s boot and shoe business shop was located in the rear of McMurtrie’s Cloth Store.591

 

Advertisement; for John McMurtrie, merchant tailor, and dealer in all kinds of ready made clothing, who offered to do all kinds of cutting, fitting and making clothing in the latest style and on short notice. Mr. McMurtrie’s shop was the first building north of the railroad track on the west side of South Bridge Street.592

 

Justus Nading came to America from Germany in June 1883.The day after he arrived in New York City he traveled directly to Yorkville. In March 1884, he bought a bakery and hotel owned by Ira Lozier on the west side of South Bridge Street between Hydraulic Avenue and the river. The building was a small frame structure with a few sleeping rooms, a dining room and kitchen. Three weeks after Mr. Nading entered the hotel business, small pox broke out in Yorkville. The outbreak occurred in Fred Johnson's saloon next door to the bakery and hotel and no one wanted to come near that part of town. Justus thought it was all over for him but fortunately was able to hold on until the December 1884 when he assumed management of Beck's Hotel on the northeast corner of Fox Road and South Main Street. In the spring of 1885, Mr. and Mrs. Nading purchased the real estate on South Bridge Street where their bakery and first hotel was located, and moved back downtown.

From the start, Justus was popular with his customers. He was polite and obliging, and the business began to grow. Shortly after purchasing the property, the Nadings expanded their business by adding a restaurant. Justus became aware that there was a demand by traveling men and others, for better hotel accommodations in Yorkville. To meet this need, the Nadings built a small brick addition on the rear of their establishment. The first floor of the new building was used to expand the restaurant and bakery. The second floor contained four hotel rooms. For a short time, this was enough to meet the demand. When their patronage increased, they purchased the lot north of their original building and built a two-story brick building there in 1890. The lot was between his present location and Fred Johnson’s saloon. The building had twenty-six feet frontage on South Bridge Street. The first floor was used for a storeroom and the second floor as a hotel. They installed all the modern conveniences, steam heat, hot and cold water, etc. 593 The bedrooms were comfortable and well furnished. Justus and his wife served good meals and provided comfortable lodging. When court was in session, many members of the legal fraternity stayed there.

In November 1892, Justus Nading advertised his hotel in the local newspaper. Hotel Nading located on the north side of railroad on South Bridge Street, Yorkville, IL. The hotel has good accommodations for travelers, and a restaurant and bakery. The first-class bakery furnishes bread, cakes, pies, etc. Oysters can be purchased by the can, in bulk, or served in the restaurant. Fresh fruit and vegetables are available when in season. Travelers will find good rooms and beds, good meals and prompt attention. Meals served at any hour.594

About 1897 the Nadings sold their bakery and fruit business to B. N. Colvin and George Ohse to concentrate on their hotel business. By this time, their hotel business had grown to the point they did not have enough room to accommodate the demand. In 1898, the original wooden structure was torn down and replaced with a three-story brick building. The third story extended over the top of the earlier two story brick building used as a hotel. The building was three stories high, 24 feet wide and 100 feet long. The dining room and office were on the first floor. The second and third floors were divided into thirty sleeping rooms. A large area on the second floor in the front of the building contained a parlor for the guests.595

Initially the hotel enjoyed a good business from people coming from the southern part of the county who found it necessary to stay over night in Yorkville on court or other business. When jury trials lasted beyond a day it was not feasible for them to commute between their homes and Yorkville. This changed with the advent and increased use of automobiles. The automobile made it possible to commute between the far corners of the county and Yorkville.

By 1905, The Nading family had been in the hotel business for over twenty years. Mrs. Nading had been an active participant, and had been responsible for all the food preparation for the period and was ready for a rest. Justus' interests were also changing. He was instrumental in bringing the Chicago Telephone Company to Yorkville. The company's central office was in the hotel and Justus was the local manager. By 1905, the hotel business was waning and the telephone company's prospects were rising, so the Nadings decided to leave the hotel business.

A deal was completed, and the hotel business was leased to C. B. Dursey596 of Hinsdale for one year. Justus retained his position as local manager of the Chicago Telephone Company and the offices remained in the hotel building. Possession was given October 1, 1905, and the Nading family moved out of the hotel into a home purchased from the Jacob P. Black, Estate. Mr. and Mrs. Dursey ran the hotel until their lease expired September 30, 1906. Shortly after their lease expired, they moved to Toluca, IL where they had purchased a hotel.597 Mr. and Mrs. Naden resumed the management of their hotel, which was closed long enough to completely refurbish and redecorate before reopening.598

In 1911, Yorkville had two saloons. The Nadings wanted to lease the hotel but needed to make the business more attractive. Justus convinced the Yorkville Board of Trustees to grant him a saloon license. The basement of the hotel had been remodeled, and the saloon was to be in the basement. This meant the new saloon would be next door to Fred Johnson's saloon. Many Yorkville residents disagreed with the Board's action and felt they had been duped because Justus was a member of the Board of Trustees that granted the saloon license.

At this time, the hotel and saloon was rented to Fred Hohoff and his partner Nick Kramer. In February 1914 the partnership was dissolved and Nick Kramer and his wife returned to Muskegon, MI. Hohoff continued to manage the hotel until the spring of 1915, when it came back into the Nadings hands. At this time the hotel was under the direct management of Mr. Nading but he hired Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Behlke of McHenry to manage the hotel and food service.599 600

Less than a year later the Behlke family left the hotel and moved to Rockford, IL. The Nadings returned to the full management of the hotel. Mrs. William Bretthauer was hired to assist in the restaurant.601

In 1919, Justus retired from the management of the Hotel Nading and Mr. and Mrs. George W. Snyder of Racine, Wisconsin replaced him. The Snyders had been in the hotel business for a number of years. George had been with a Springfield, Illinois hotel for twelve years and recently associated with the Racine (Wisconsin) Elks Club.602

By 1925, Charles B. Krohn was renting the Nading Hotel. Justus had found a buyer for the hotel but the deal was mutually called off. Justus had made up his mind that the prospective purchasers were not the kind of people that would fit into the Yorkville community.603

In April 1926, Charles B. Krohn sold his interest in the Hotel Nading to Frank Mikula of Berwyn. Mr. Krohn was undecided what he was going to do, but his wife who was reputed to be an excellent cook, remained as head of the kitchen.604

Apparently the hotel was actually operated by Mrs. Mikula rather than her husband. Frank ran some "club rooms" in the basement of the hotel where local men would come to play billiards or what ever. A fight occurred in the clubrooms and the sheriff was called to investigate. An investigation of the cause of the fight led to the discovery that home brew was being manufactured in the hotel.605 When Sheriff Barkley, and his deputy, Frank R. Skinner, searched the basement rooms they found a large number of bottles of beer and everything necessary to manufacture the beverage. In September 1926, Frank Mikula was arrested and sentenced to 90 days in the county jail for manufacturing and selling home brew.

In 1933, the Hotel Nading stood vacant for several months. The hotel was newly decorated and in September 1933 reopened to the public. Mr. and Mrs. Leech and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer of Elgin assumed the management of the hotel.

In May 1936, the management of the Hotel Nading and Cafe changed again. On May 20th Mr. L. A. "Lefty" Peterson, a native of Newark became the manager. He had been the chief clerk at the Hotel Aurora for several years before taking over the Hotel Nading. Miss Pearl Brown, an experience restaurant cook, managed the hotel kitchen.

In April 1938, Mrs. Minor assumed management of the Hotel Nading restaurant. She had operated a restaurant in Sandwich for the previous fifteen years.606

 

In 1939 a building was built by Illinois Bell Telephone Company at the rear of lot 1, block 7, on West Van Emmon Street to house the company’s new dial telephone equipment.607

 

Frank Pennuto operated Frank's Tavern next door to the Hotel Nading. On May 23, 1939, Frank assumed the management of the Hotel Nading as well, and renamed it the Yorkville Hotel and Restaurant.608

 

The Prim Beauty Shop will move on September 1, to its new location on the main floor of the Yorkville Hotel. The entrance to the shop will be through the south door, next to the Old Age Assistance Office.609

 

The Hotel Nading, a. k. a. Yorkville Hotel, still stands today (2006) on the west side of South Bridge Street between Hydraulic Avenue and the river but is no longer used as a hotel.

 

Lot 1: Jacob P and Elias A. Black & wives to Hannah Morley, south part of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 28, 1863, $450.

Lot 1: James Springer & wife to James B. Littlewood, west half lot 8, block 22, and 50 feet off of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 28, 1868, $1,400.

Lot 1: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Willis Atkins, north half and 25 feet of lot 1, and east end of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 12, 1874, $1,000.

Lot 1: James B. Littlewood & wife to Samuel Arundale, west half of lot 8, block 22 Yorkville; and east 50 feet of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 3, 1884, $1,000.

Lot 1: Joseph F. Hallock & wife, et al, to Mary Nading, north half lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 12, 1887, $1,200.

Lot 1: W. F. Morley, by Sheriff to Alex Kennedy, Certificate of sale, southeast part of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 21, 1891, $425.

Lot 1: Sheriff of Kendall County to heirs of Alex. Kennedy, southeast part of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1893, $425.

Lot 1: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Justus Nading, lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1898.

Lot 1: Adele M. Kremer, et al, to Justus Nading, part of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1898.

Lot 1: Master in Chancery to Douglas Kennedy, part of lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1899, $800.

Lot 1: Willis Atkins to Joshua N. Austin, part of lots 1 and 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1900, $1,300.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $600.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $1,270.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $1,270.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1923 T-A, $1,905.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,910.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,200.

 

 

Street address: 107 South Bridge Street

Legal description: south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Rumor has it that the building on this lot was erected by Wellington Mason in the eighteen fifties. Further research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Shortly after it was built it was operated as a saloon

 

Hass Saloon, Gottfried “Fred” Hass, proprietor (January 1966 – March 1871)

Sullivan Saloon, Michael “Mike” Sullivan proprietor (March 1871 – May 1880)

Kellett & Johnson Saloon, John Kellett & Fred Johnson proprietors (May 1800 – April 1884)

Johnson Saloon, Fred Johnson proprietor (April 1884 – 1915)

 

Barnes Restaurant, A. C. Barnes proprietor (March 1885 - November 1887)

Nading Bakery & Fruit, Justus Nading proprietor, (November 1887 – May 1897)

Nading Hotel, Justus Nading proprietor (1890 - )

Colvin & Ohse Bakery & Fruit, B. N. Colvin & George Ohse proprietors (May 1897 - )

Ohse Grocery, George Ohse Proprietor (August 1901 – March 1907)

Frank‘s Tavern, Frank Pennuto proprietor

 

Justus Nading came to America from Germany in June 1883.The day after he arrived in New York City he traveled directly to Yorkville. In March 1884, he bought a bakery and hotel owned by Ira Lozier on the west side of South Bridge Street between Hydraulic Avenue and the river. The building was a small frame structure with a few sleeping rooms, a dining room and kitchen. Three weeks after Mr. Nading entered the hotel business, small pox broke out in Yorkville. The outbreak occurred in Fred Johnson's saloon next door to the bakery and hotel and no one wanted to come near that part of town. Justus thought it was all over for him but fortunately was able to hold on until the December 1884 when he assumed management of Beck's Hotel on the northeast corner of Fox Road and South Main Street. In the spring of 1885, Mr. and Mrs. Nading purchased the real estate on South Bridge Street where their bakery and first hotel was located, and moved back downtown.

 

From the start, Justus was popular with his customers. He was polite and obliging, and the business began to grow. Shortly after purchasing the property, the Nadings expanded their business by adding a restaurant. Justus became aware that there was a demand by traveling men and others, for better hotel accommodations in Yorkville. To meet this need, the Nadings built a small brick addition on the rear of their establishment. The first floor of the new building was used to expand the restaurant and bakery. The second floor contained four hotel rooms. For a short time, this was enough to meet the demand. When their patronage increased, they purchased the lot north of their original building and built a two-story brick building there in 1890. The lot was between his present location and Fred Johnson’s saloon. The building had twenty-six feet frontage on South Bridge Street. The first floor was used for a storeroom and the second floor as a hotel. They installed all the modern conveniences, steam heat, hot and cold water, etc. 610 The bedrooms were comfortable and well furnished. Justus and his wife served good meals and provided comfortable lodging. When court was in session, many members of the legal fraternity stayed there.

 

Many people may not know that Mr. A. C. Barnes has opened a new restaurant and eating house in Yorkville at Justus Nading’s old stand, but such is the fact, and he would be glad to receive a part of your patronage. It is a good place to get your dinner when in town, or to get board by the week. Mr. Barnes will keep everything neat and orderly around the place. He also has a line of canned goods, confectioneries, tobacco and cigars, and receives fresh bread daily.611

 

Brother Barnes and his family have departed. On Thursday last, his belongings were loaded on wagons and taken to the village of Batavia. Mrs. Barnes was a number one provider of good dinners and she will be missed. Justus Nading will occupy the place as a restaurant and bakery.612

 

Justus Nading expects to be ready for business about the middle of next week. He has thoroughly overhauled and refitted the store lately occupied by A. C. Barnes, north of the railroad track.613

 

Justus Nading is now ready for business. It has taken time and trouble to get things in order, but it is done, and the bake oven is running. Justus can furnish you with good bread, cakes, pies, and confectionery.

He received fresh oyster every day and sells them by the can or quart, or furnishes a hot stew.

He has rooms for boarders, regular or transient. He furnishes meals at all reasonable hours. He will keep a first class restaurant and wishes to solicit the public for their patronage. You will find him on South Bridge Street, second door north of the railroad on the west side. Give him a chance to serve you and he will try and please.614

 

Justus Nading has sold his bakery and fruit business to B. N. Colvin and George Ohse, and these gentlemen will take possession the first of May. Mr. Nading will devote his time to running the hotel and keeping a first-class place of entertainment.615

 

After having been out of business since selling to Frank Crum, George Ohse will reopen the Nading store in a few days. He will carry a full line of up to date and staple groceries, fruit and vegetables in season and Mason’s bakery goods.

Mr. Ohse will endeavor to make his new store headquarters for the finest trade, and will carry goods to warrant it.616

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 10, 1866, $150.

Lot 2: Washington Thomas to Gottfried Haas, south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 20, 1866, $175.

Lot 2: Gottfried Haas & wife to Michael Sullivan, (south half) lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 4, 1871, $3,000.

Lot 2: Michael Sullivan & wife to Johnson & Kellett, (south half) lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1880, $1,500.

Lot 2: George M. Hollenback, Master of Chancery, to Fred Johnson, Master’s deed, (south half) lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 31, 1887, $1,200.

Lot 2: Fred Johnson & wife to Justus Nading, south half of lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 26, 1890, $400.

 

Justus Nading, south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $90.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $1,270.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $1,270.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1923 T-A, $1,905.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,910.

 

Justus Nading, lot 1 and south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,200.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 105 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: north half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot is on the west side of South Bridge Street.

Rumor has it that the building on this lot was erected by Wellington Mason in the eighteen fifties. Further research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Shortly after it was built it was operated as a saloon

 

Hass Saloon, Gottfried “Fred” Hass, proprietor (January 1966 – March 1871)

Sullivan Saloon, Michael “Mike” Sullivan proprietor (March 1871 – May 1880)

Kellett & Johnson Saloon, John Kellett & Fred Johnson proprietors (May 1800 – April 1884)

Johnson Saloon, Fred Johnson proprietor (April 1884 – 1915)

 

Maier Garage and Studebaker Auto Agency, William C. Maier proprietor

Homer G. Dickson Implement Company (1936 – December 1951)

Homer G. Dickson Plumbing & Heating

 

The building that housed Mike Sullivan’s Saloon was the fourth building built in downtown Yorkville. It became the site of a portion of the Maier Garage and Studebaker Auto Agency. Latter the Maier building was incorporated into the Homer G. Dickson Implement and Plumbing and Heating building.

 

Harry Lyon has bought the Fred Johnson property near the bridge and is having it town down. He will have a service and sales station in the building to be erected on the land. This is an agreeable change on South Bridge Street as the old building is quite unsightly.617

 

The Fred Johnson building on South Bridge Street next to the Nadin Hotel, was burned to the ground during the noon hour, Friday. The place was being razed by a gang of workmen to make way for a new garage to be built by E. H. “Harry” Lyon. The men had gone to dinner when the fire was discovered and in an hour the place was a charred mass of ruins…..The building that had been an ice house, adjoining the main structure, had been torn down and the main part was being torn down. If not for this fact the buildings of Angus J. Carter would surely have burned.

Valiant work of the fire department also saved the Nading building. As it was, flames broke out in the doorway which opened on to the burning building and the second story was in danger. A plate glass window in the Carter building burst from the heat of the fire and the south side of the building was badly scorched. The loss on the burned property is not covered by insurance. Mr. Lyon does not consider the loss as great however as the building was being torn down and the lumber was not considered to be of any great value….

Too much cannot be said of the fire department. The boys were on the job at the start and worked against an almost impossible heat to save the surrounding buildings. The destroyed building was an old frame building and burned fiercely. The hotel was of brick and Carter’s building was sheathed with galvanized iron. This alone saved them. The frame buildings behind were close and the livery barn was too close for comfort but the firemen kept the blaze well in hand from the start….

One hypothesis is that the burned building was erected by the late Wellington Mason in the fifties.?? Note that Washington Thomas purchased the property January 10, 1866. Mr. Thomas ran the local livestock yard and had a meat market. It seems more likely that Washington Thomas was the builder than Wellington Mason.?? Shortly after its construction the building was sold and was operated as a saloon. Later the first saloon keeper, Gottfried “Fred” Hass, was to operate a saloon at 209 South Bridge Street. In 1876, Michael Sullivan ran the bar. Then John Kellett took possession and Fred Johnson became his partner in the early eighteen eighties. In April 1884, small pox broke out in the place and many were stricken. The disease spread to the Fox River House and the two saloons in Yorkville were closed. At one time there were eleven cases of small pox in Yorkville. John Kellett died April 7, 1884 and George Knight died April 9, 1884.The rest of the stricken recovered. Fred Johnson continued to run the business at intervals from that time until the saloons in Yorkville were closed for the last time when the town voted dry in 1915. During the intervening years 1884-1915, there were nine years when the town voted dry and the saloons were closed.618

 

Harry Lyon and William C. Maier are to put up a modern garage building on the site. They will have a forty foot cement block front and will build 50 feet back with tile walls. As soon as business warrants it they will extend the building the depth of the lot, making it 100 feet deep over all. The new firm will have an automobile service and sales station. There will be a fully equipped repair department, and the new firm should do a good business.619

 

Lot 2: William H. Clark & wife to Alvah Beecher, north half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 30, 1864, $200.

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 10, 1866, $150.

Lot 2: Washington Thomas to Gottfried Haas, south half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 20, 1866, $175.

Lot 2: Gottfried Haas & wife to Michael Sullivan, (south half) lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 4, 1871, $3,000.

Lot 2: Michael Sullivan & wife to Johnson & Kellett, (south half) lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1, 1880, $1,500.

Lot 2: George M. Hollenback, Master of Chancery, to Fred Johnson, Master’s deed, (north half) lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 31, 1887, $1,200.

Lot 2: Fred Johnson & wife to Justus Nading, south half of lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 26, 1890, $400.

Lot 2: Fred Johnson to Ernest “Harry” Lyon and William C. Maier, (north half) lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1919, $1,000.

Lot 2: Ernest “Harry” Lyon to William C. Maier, (north half) lot 2 and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1922.

 

Fred Johnson, north half lot 2, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $200.

 

Fred Johnson, north half of lot 2 and south 22 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $467.

 

Fred Johnson, north half of lot 2 and south 22 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $467.

 

Lyon and Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1920 T-A, increased to $1,400.

 

Lyon & Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1923 T-A, $1,100.

 

William C. Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,100.

 

William C. Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,200.

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: 103 South Bridge Street

Legal description: south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Thomas McMurtrie Blacksmith Shop, Thomas McMurtrie proprietor

Markel Blacksmith Shop, Joseph Markel proprietor

Lamp Blacksmith Shop, John H. Lamp proprietor

Ice House associated with Fred Johnson’s Saloon

Maier Studebaker Auto Agency & Garage, William C. Maier proprietor ( 1919 - )

Homer G. Dickson Plumbing & Heating, Homer G. Dickson proprietor

Homer G. Dickson Implement Company, Homer G. Dickson proprietor

 

A fire in the building formerly used as an icehouse by Fred Johnson and next door to the former saloon threatened to burn the village Thursday night. The fire bell rang at midnight and aroused the people to their duties as volunteer firemen. It was not long until the fire was extinguished but the alarm still rest in the minds of the people. Fred Johnson had put an icehouse in the building formerly used as a blacksmith shop by Joe Markel. The icehouse was next door to his former saloon and formed a part of the latter building. When the firemen reached the scene they found a nicely built fire on the edge of the sawdust. It was not long until the flames were extinguished. Had the fire gained headway, it is not impossible that the Knudson livery barn, the Nading Hotel, the Carter store, and all the buildings across the street would have been destroyed.

About a month ago there was a fire at the rear of the main part of the Johnson building. Residents of the Hotel Nading spotted the fire and extinguished it. It was said that they could detect the odor of kerosene in the smoke that came from the flames.1620

 

The Lyon & Maier garage building is going up rapidly and will be an improvement to South Bridge Street. At present they are operating a repair shop in the livery barn recently vacated by Oscar C. Knudson.621

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 9, 1866, $400.

Lot 3: Washington Thomas & wife to Silas C. Gary and E. Regan, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 6, 1866, $1,000.

Lot 3: Silas C. Gary & wife to James Springer, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 18, 1869.

Lot 3: James Springer & wife to Michael Sullivan, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 8, 1875, $200.

Lot 3: James Springer & wife to Ann E. Greenfield, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 12, 1877, $1,400.

Lot 3: Israel L. Carter, et al, to Ann E. Greenfield, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and other lands, August 16, 1889, $600.

Lot 3: Ann E. Greenfield & husband to Israel L. Carter, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 16, 1889, $900.

Lot 3: Michael Sullivan to Fred Johnson, part of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 25, 1890, $500.

Lot 3: Viola Carter and Capitola Markel to Angus J. Carter, lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1912, $450.

Lot 3: Fred Johnson to Ernest H. Lyon and William C. Maier, lot 2, and part of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1919, $1,000.

Lot 3: Ernest H. Lyon to William C. Maier, lot 2 and part of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1922.

Lot 3: Clyde A. Barron to Harry M. Hall, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937.

Lot 3: Harry M. Hall and wife to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937.

Lot 3; Reuben R. Regan to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937.

Lot 3: Elizabeth Forton to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937.

Lot 3: May Anderson to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937

Lot 3: Edward E. Regan to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937

Lot 3: Clinton W. Regan to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937

Lot 3: Devona Regan Hart & husband to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937

Lot 3: Mrs. O. D. Harrison & husband to Homer G. Dickson, part lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 15, 1937

 

Fred Johnson, 25 feet of the west side of lot 3, block 7, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

Israel L. Carter, 40 feet of the north side of lot 3, block 7, 1899 T-A, $120.

 

Fred Johnson, north half of lot 2 and south 22 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $467.

 

Lyon and Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1920 T-A, increased to $1,400.

 

Lyon & Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1923 T-A, $1,100.

 

William C. Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,100.

 

William C. Maier, north half lot 2, and south 22 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $2,200.

 

Street address: 101 South Bridge Street.

Legal description: north 40 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Is the first lot on the west side of South Bridge Street and next to the river.

Building was originally known as the Cooper-Seely Building but became known as the Carter Building.

The building was the second oldest building in Yorkville before it was razed in 1954 to construct a new building for the Homer G. Dickson Implement Company.

 

E. K. Green Carriage & Wagon Maker (March 1876 - )

Greenfield Hardware

Carter Pump Company, Israel Carter proprietor

Carter & Son Hardware, Israel & Angus Carter proprietors

Carter Hardware, Angus J. Carter proprietor ( - December 1922)

Carter Hardware, Clyde A. Barron proprietor (January 1923 - )

Paulsen Hatchery, Norman Paulsen proprietor ( - )

Yorkville Feed Store, Arthur and Norman Paulsen proprietors (September 1934 –

Homer G. Dickson Implement Company (1936 – December 1951)

George M. Dickson Insurance & Real Estate, George M. Dickson proprietor (May 1939 - )

Homer G. Dickson Plumbing & Heating

 

Advertisement for E. K. Green Carriage & Wagon Maker. To my old customers I wish to inform you that I have rented the shop between the bridge and Thomas McMurtrie’s blacksmith shop, and I am prepared to build buggies and wagons to order. I will also do jobbing of all kinds promptly and at fair prices. I will build to order book cases and wardrobes in all styles and qualities.622

 

I. L. Carter has bought the building near the bridge, used as a hardware store, from R. R. (Richard Russell) Greenfield for $900.623

 

Carter & Son will soon commence an addition on the north side of their store, which will occupy twenty-four feet frontage on South Bridge Street.624

 

The Carter Hardware Store has been undergoing improvements that make it much more convenient and at the same time a more appealing store for the village. Plate glass windows have been put in, an addition built on the back of the store, and steel ceilings put in. The tin shop has been moved into the new room in the rear of building and now has spacious quarters.625

 

Announcement by Clyde A. Barron that he has taken over the business of the old established firm of A. J. Carter, and will continue doing business under the old name and continue handling a complete line of hardware. He also announced that he had taken over the Public Service Company sales and would carry a full line of electrical goods.626

 

Advertisement; for the Paulsen Hatchery in the Carter Building.627

 

Hatchery reopens. The Paulsen brothers have reopened a feed store and hatchery in the Carter Building at the south end of the bridge. The firm will be known as the Yorkville Feed Store.

A full line of “Ultra LIfed” feed will be handled, and Art and Norman will be glad to tell you the merits of their line.628

 

George M. Dickson announces that he has moved his insurance offices from the Farm Bureau Building to the Homer G. Dickson implement store on the west side of South Bridge Street at the bridge.629

 

Homer G. Dickson is erecting a building on the west side of South Bridge Street at the river to store his large inventory of farm machinery. Ira Perkins and his men are erecting the building, which in fact, is an addition to the smaller Carter Building which Mr. Dickson now occupies.630

 

Angus J. Carter, north 40 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1915 T-A, $350.

 

Angus J. Carter, north 40 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1919 T-A, $400.

 

Angus J. Carter, north 40 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1923 T-A, $600.

 

Minnie Carter, north 40 feet lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $600.

 

Harry Hall & Thomas Paulsen, north 40 feet of lot 3, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,200.

 

 

Lot 4

 

Street address: ? West Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description: north 50 feet by 75 feet east of the west 90 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot 4 is located west of the lots on the west side of South Bridge Street. It faces on West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Weaver & Hallock Express & Livery (March 1887 - )

Yorkville Livery Barn, Oscar C. Knudson & Henry Collman proprietors (1895 – April 1904)

Yorkville Livery Barn, Oscar C. Knudson & George Mewhirter proprietors (April 1904 – May 1919)

Byerrum Veterinarian office and horse hospital, Dr. E. E. Byerrum, D.V.D. proprietor (May 1919 – July 1923)

Lyon & Maier Garage, E. Harry Lyon and William C. Maier proprietors (August 1919 - )

 

Weaver & Hallock have begun construction of their large livery barn, which is to be built on West Hydraulic Avenue, half a block west of South Bridge Street. The barn is to be 36 by 80 feet and 19 feet high. They have also added a nice span of iron grays to their horse stock, making a total of thirteen. They have a good supply of double and single carriages and by the first of May will be prepared to run as fine a livery as there is west of Chicago.631

 

O. C. Knudson will move his undertaking rooms to the Cotton Building as soon as the rooms are refinished and put into shape for him. Mr. Knudson is preparing to give his patrons better service than ever. He will have a combination chapel and display room in front and morgue in the rear. As an undertaker, Mr. Knudson is a credit to the community. He is an able workman and an agreeable director. He will abandon the horse livery business and have only his automobile. The livery barn will be taken over by Dr. Byerrum as a horse hospital and his office as veterinarian.632

 

Dr. E. E. Byerrum has moved to Naperville, Du Page County, where he will take up the work of County Veterinarian examining dairy cattle for tuberculosis. This will be financially beneficial for Dr. Byerrum because of the large number of dairy farms in his new territory.633

 

In 1895, Oscar C. Knudson started a livery business in the livery barn just west of Hotel Nading, which was burned to the ground in about 1926.

 

The Lyon & Maier garage building is going up rapidly and will be an improvement to South Bridge Street. At present they are operating a repair shop in the livery barn recently vacated by Oscar C. Knudson.634

 

Lot 4: Joseph F. Hallock & wife to Frank A, Weaver, undivided half interest in 75 feet off of the east end of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 18, 1889, $3,000.

Lot 4: Frank Weaver to Joseph F. Hallock, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1894, $1,500.

Lot 4: Frank Weaver to C. W. Hallock, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1895, $1,500.

Lot 4: C. W. Hallock to Flora E. Weaver, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1895, $1,500.

Lot 4: Joseph F. Hallock to Henry J. Collman, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1898, $2,300.

Lot 4: Henry J. Collman to Oscar C. Knudson, et al, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1904, $3,000.

Lot 4: Oscar C. Knudson to George Mewhirter, half interest in part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1910, $1,500.

Lot 4: J. E. Price & wife to Homer G. Dickson, 75 feet off east end of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 17, 1939.

 

Justus Nading, north 50 feet by 75 feet east of west 90 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A $100.

 

Justus Nading, north 50 feet by 75 feet east of the west 90 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $200.

 

 

Street address: ? West Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description:south 50 by 100 feet east of west 90 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Parker Blacksmith Shop, Judd S. Parker, proprietor ( - June 1915)

Yorkville Garage, Judd S. and Leonard Parker proprietors (May 1912 – June 1915)

Yorkville Garage & Vulcanizing Company, Billy Smith proprietor (June 1915 – September 1916)

 

A thirty-foot square addition has been planned for the Parker Brother’s garage in Yorkville and work is to be started as soon as the weather will permit. The extra building will be added to the west side of the present blacksmith shop and will include an office and storage room for there or four automobiles. Driving through this will be found the machine shop which will contain much new equipment. This garage, under the direction of Leonard Parker, will make a shop well prepared for the needs of automobile owners. Judd Parker will operate the blacksmith shop in conjunction with the garage.635

 

Advertisement by Judd Parker for repair work: Notice to farmers! Bring you pulverizers, spaders, and plows to the only shop in Yorkville equipped for the work. I have a trip-hammer, emery grinder and an up-to-date disc sharpener to do first-class work for you with fourteen years experience in that line. Why let an inexperienced person experiment with such work as plow work? Signed: Judd Parker Yorkville, Illinois.636

 

The Parker Brother’s Garage is nearing completion and the blacksmith shop and automobile shop will soon be separated. The improvement leaves plenty of room for the boys to work.637

 

Advertisement for the opening of the Parker Brother’s garage named the Yorkville Garage. The Yorkville Garage is now ready for business with a new building, new tools, a full line of accessories, and high grade gasoline and oils. Garage was advertised as the only garage in the county with day and night service.638

 

Advertisement: During December, I will give a special discount for cash on “Never-slip” and steel plugged horse shoes. Material and Workmanship are of the best. Call and convince yourself. J. S. Parker, Blacksmith, old Markel shop, Yorkville, IL.639

 

Billy Smith has rented the blacksmith shop formerly run by Judd Parker and will operate it as a garage in conjunction with a steam vulcanizing plant. He has had several years experience with auto, stationary and traction gasoline engines. He has made a special study of electric lighting and starting, in Chicago shops. The plant will be equipped with modern machinery for quick repairs. Prices are reasonable and nothing but first class work done. The business will be under the name of the Yorkville Garage and Vulcanizing Co. All auto owners are solicited for business.640

 

The Yorkville Garage and Vulcanizing Company of which Billy Smith is the proprietor, has moved to its new quarters between South Bridge Street and the Burlington depot on East Hydraulic Avenue. It is a modern garage in every way, recently completed by George M. Johnson. There is ample space for display, storage, machine work, and a place of business of which anyone could be proud of. The balance of the new machinery will be installed soon when a more comprehensive description will be given.641

 

Judson S. Parker, south 50 by 100 feet east of west 90 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $75.

 

Judson S. Parker, south 50 by 100 feet east of west 90 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $200.

 

Street address: ? West Hydraulic Avenue

Legal description: west 90 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Carr Creamery

Bromley Machine Shop, Edson M. Bromley proprietor (November 1905 - February 1912)

Markel & Jones Blacksmith Shop (May 1906 - )

Bieritz Machine Shop, William Bieritz proprietor (February 1912 – December 1945)

Yorkville Garage, Frank H. Grant proprietor ( - July 1912)

Yorkville Garage, Frank H. and Charles Grant proprietors (July 1912 – September 1914)

Yorkville Garage, Frank Ilsemann proprietor (September 1913 – June 1914)

Yorkville Garage, William E. Hayden & Charles A. Bogardus proprietors (June 1914 – December 1914)

Valley Garage, Fred L. Wright, Martin Hauge, William E. Hayden, and Charles A. Bogardus proprietors (December 1914 – June 1916)

Hubbell Brothers Paint Shop (June 1916 - )

Powell Machine Shop, William Powell proprietor (December 1945 – December 1945)

 

Street address: ? West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: West

 

In 1888, Yorkville merchant, George M. Johnson, established a creamery on three acres of land on West Hydraulic Avenue to make butter.642, 643

 

The new building of the Fox River Butter Company, on West Hydraulic Street is assuming huge proportions and promises to be a place of great industry. The main part is a 31 by 54 feet two-story building with large single story wings on both sides. Mr. George Schamp and assistants from Oswego are doing the carpenter work.644

 

The new Yorkville creamery, officially the Fox River Butter Company, has received a coat of paint, and the brick boiler room is now in the course of construction. It is a fine building, and Yorkville is under obligation to Mr. Kilbourne for putting it up.645

 

The wood cheese factory building in Yorkville is to be vacated by us in a few days. It is suitable for a blacksmith or wagon shop, or any light manufacturing. We will sell it with or without the six horse power boiler and engine. The building is connected with the village water works. Apply to C. S. Kilbourne, Manager of the Fox River Butter Company.646

 

The new Fox River Creamery is now occupied. The old building was vacated this past week.647

 

Edson Bromley has bought the wood frame building constructed by the Fox River Butter Company and later used by the Carr creamery west of the livery barn on West Hydraulic Avenue, and remodel it for his growing business. When he gets the place clear of the old machinery and repairs made he will move his north side plant over here and put in machinery and fixtures to carry on a first-class repair shop doing all kinds of iron and wood work, blacksmithing in all its branches, and make it a useful and paying plant. Mr. Bromley has energy and ability to do things. It is a good thing for Yorkville that this property is occupied.648

 

The building that stood east of the bowling alley for some time has been moved west and is now next door to the old creamery building occupied by Ed Bromley. It is being fitted up for a blacksmith shop to be used by Markel & Jones. They are crowded for room in their present location. Justus Nading owns the property.649

 

It is a busy place down west of the livery barn, and the “hum of industry” is heard all day. Markel & Jones have moved their blacksmith shop and everything is fitted up in good shape. They have a good forge, good floor, and when they finish painting it will be quite attractive. They have more room for wagons and carriages at their new location. Just below them (to the west) is Ed Bromley’s machine and blacksmith shop, powered by electricity. He has a house full of work to be done, wagons and farm machinery to be repaired, and pulverizer blades and moldboards to be sharpened, making this one of Yorkville’s business centers.650

 

E. M. Bromley, who has run a machine shop in Yorkville for a number of years, has sold out to William Bieritz, the change being made Saturday February 10. The business will be conducted on the same lines as before and the new proprietor will endeavor to give the same good service as his predecessor. Mr. Bieritz has been in the employ of Mr. Bromley for about three years and has learned the requirements of the trade. Mr. Bromley will operate an automobile salesroom in Aurora and will make that city his permanent headquarters.651

 

Grant Brothers sold the Yorkville Garage in Yorkville to Frank Ilsemann, who too possession in August 1913. Mr. Ilsemann will continue the work of automobile repairing and the sale of sundries, gasoline and oil, and carry a line of Prest-o-lite tanks.652

 

Announcement that Frank Ilsemann will open Yorkville’s new automobile garage Saturday August 23, 1913 in The William Bieritz Building.653

 

The Yorkville Garage has changed hands again and is now being operated by Hayden & Bogardus, two Plano men who bought out Frank Ilsemann. Their work is good and from the experience they have the new owners should be able to handle cars. Martin Hauge is still with the garage.654

 

Advertisement for “The Valley Garage” a service station equipped for handling automobile and general repair work. William E. “Bill” Hayden & Charles A. Bogardus proprietors, Yorkville, Illinois.655

 

The Valley Garage Corporation was given papers of incorporation by the Secretary of State this week and the new concern is ready for business. The firm is made up of Fred L. Wright, president; Martin Hauge, vice-president; William E. Hayden, treasurer; and C. A. Bogardus, secretary. The latter three are well know here, having been connected with the present garage since last summer, when it was bought from Frank Ilsemann. Hauge is from Morris and will have charge of the repair department. He is an experienced mechanic and with the equipment he should have no trouble in turning out good work. He will be assisted by Will Hayden, who will spend his time between repairs and other company business. He is also a skilled mechanic and has been a success while in Yorkville. Bogardus came from Plano with Hayden and has charge of accessories and the office. He is a pleasant young man and has many friends. Fred L. Wright is the new man in the company, and until early fall made his home in Aurora, where he was engaged in business. He willhave charge of the sales department and will push Overland and Ford cars.

The proposition of the boys is to build a new garage at once and fit it into a modern place for the handling of automobiles. They are soon to start a campaign of stock selling to raise the necessary money for the project and will place their shares for $50.00 per share. This is a praiseworthy attempt of four bright, square fellows to give Yorkville a place second to none where machines can be taken care of honestly and well.656

 

Advertisement for the Valley Garage Corporation, Ford agents for Oswego, Na-Au-Say, Kendall, Fox and Bristol Townships with offices at Yorkville and Oswego.657

 

Fred G. Wideman has bought Alvin Miller’s interest in the Valley Garage Corporation and has been made superintendent of the garage. Fred Wright will have charge of the sales department. William E. Hayden will manage the repair department at Yorkville, and George Barkley will manage the repair department at the Oswego branch. A new building will be built in the near future with all the modern accessories for the care of automobiles.658

 

Hugh Harnly has bought the interest of Fred L. Wright in the Valley Garage Corporation, the change taking place at once. This leaves the members of the firm, Fred G. Wideman, Hugh Harnley, William E. Hayden, and George Barkley. Fred Wright will continue with the garage for a time, at least, in the sales end of the business.659

 

Advertisement for the Hubbell Brothers paint shop: Automobiles and carriages will look like new id painted at our new paint shop. Let us call for your storm windows and doors, paint them, and return them to you when you need them.660

 

In about 1900, the two Laird brothers, T. J. & R. A. “Bob”, came to Yorkville from West Chicago to run the Carr creamery in the building now owned by William Bieritz.661

 

William Bieritz of Yorkville has sold his wood and metal working business to William Powell of Chicago, who is now on the job. Mr. and Mrs. Bieritz have moved to a home south of Yorkville.

Mr. Bieritz started business here in February 1911, and for 34 years has kept various machines going for the citizens of the county and built new machines and implements. For the past twenty years he has served as Fire Chief for the Village of Yorkville…..

In his business Mr. Bieritz was always able to solve the perplexing problems arising in the repair of a machine and was adept at making a new part when factory pars were not readily available.

He wishes to thank his patrons of 34 years for their trust and we dare say his patrons thank him for the gray hair he saved them by fixing their machines quickly and well.

Mr. Powell will carry on the business where Bill left off. He has followed the same business in Chicago and is ready to build and repair in an able manner.662

 

Bieritz Building burns to the ground. Fire completely consumed the building occupied by William Powell Sunday evening and with it the Yorkville fire truck was destroyed.

The building, formerly owned by William Bieritz and operated as a wood and metal-working shop, had been occupied by Mr. Powell for but two weeks. The fire truck had been stored there for a number of years as Mr. Bieritz was the fire chief.

On Sunday evening Powell started the oil heating stove in the wing housing the truck and his car. Later he went down to check the heater. In some way the fire had run away and Powell found himself in a blazing room.

He made heroic attempts to get his car and the fire truck out, burning himself badly in the attempt, then wisely running up stairs to get his family out of the building.

The Bristol Fire Department was summoned and came with their truck and did their best. The Oswego Fire District truck also sped to the scene, but no efforst could check the rapid spread of the blaze, which made an inferno of the frame building in a few minutes.663

 

Palace Car Creamery, west 90 feet of lot 4, block 7, 1899 T-A, $700.

 

William Bieritz, west 90 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $750.

 

William Bieritz, west 90 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,500.

 

Lot 4: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Willis Atkins, north half and 25 feet of lot 1, and east end of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 12, 1874, $1,000.

Lot 4: Willis Atkins & wife to Joshua N. Austin, north half lot 1, and part lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 10, 1879, $1,300.

Lot 4: Elias A. Black, et al, to Anna Mary Weber, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 12, 1879, $200.

George M. Hollenback, Administrator to Elias A. Black, west 50 feet of block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 24, 1886, $50.

M. Adele Kremer & husband to Fox River Butter Company, undivided half interest in 90 feet of block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 13, 1888, $90.

George M. Hollenback, Administrator to Fox River Butter Company, part of block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 20, 1888, $90.

Lot 4: Joseph F. Hallock & wife to Frank A, Weaver, undivided half interest in 75 feet off of the east end of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 18, 1889, $3,000.

Lot 4: Frank Weaver to Joseph F. Hallock, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1894, $1,500.

Lot 4: C. W. Hallock to Flora E. Weaver, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1895, $1,500.

Lot 4: Frank Weaver to C. W. Hallock, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1895, $1,500.

Lot 4: Joseph F. Hallock to Henry J. Collman, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1898, $2,300.

Lot 4: Willis Atkins to Joshua N. Austin, part of lots 1 and 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1900, $1,300.

Lot 4: Henry J. Collman to Oscar C. Knudson, et al, part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1904, $3,000.

Palace Car Creamery Company to Edson M. Bromley, west 90 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 1905, $1,250.

Lot 4: Anna Mary Weber, et al, to Justus Nading, 100 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1906, $400.

Lot 4: Oscar C. Knudson to George Mewhirter, half interest in part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1910, $1,500.

Lot 4: Edson M. Bromley to John J. Gates, west 90 feet of lot 4, block 7,Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1912, $4,000.

Lot 4: May V. Bartlett, et al, to Justus Nading, half interest in 50 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, October 1912.

Justus Nading to Judson S. Parker, south 50 by 100 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1912, $900.

Justus Nading to John Heidorn, et al, 50 feet west of east 75 feet, lot 4, block 7,Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1920, $700.

Lot 4: John J. Gates & Isabel E. Gates to William & Clara Belle Gates Bieritzwest 90 feet of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 15, 1937.

 

Henry Weber, west middle part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

Anna Mary Weber, 50 feet of the east middle part of lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $60.

 

John Heidorn, 50 feet west of east 75 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $250.

 

John Heidorn, 50 feet west of east 75 feet, lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $500.

 

Henry Collman, east 75 feet lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $200.

 

Edward Price, east 75 feet lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1925 T-A, increased to $150.

 

Edward Price, east 75 feet lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $150.

 

Edward Price, east 75 feet lot 4, block 7, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $300.

 

 

Block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Block is between the railroad and the river, west of South Main Street.

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: lot 1 and east half lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot 1: northwest corner of West Hydraulic Avenue and South Main Street.

 

Lot 1: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to William Graham, lots 1 and 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 13, 1866, $175.

Lot 1: Heirs of William Graham to Grace Graham, lot 1, block 5; and lots 1 and 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892.

Lot 1: Grace Graham to John A. Langhart, lots 1 and 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1906, $1,000.

Lot 1: John A. Langhart to Nancy E. LaVake, lot 1 and east half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914.

Lot 1: Nancy E. and Lewis LaVake, lot 1 and east half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 1931.

Lot 1: Arthur W. Hubbard, et al, to Ralph Hubbard, lot 1 and east half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1932.

Lot 1: Ralph & Ruby Hubbard to Clifford F. & Luella U. Naden lot 1 and east half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1938.

Lot 1: Edward C. Kenny, et al, to Katherine K. Riddle, part of lot 1, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 15, 1940.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Mayes and family have moved into the Hubbard house on West Hydraulic Avenue.664

 

William Graham, lots 1 and 2, block 8, 1899 T-A, $200.

 

J. U. (Junia Uriah) Hubbard Estate, lot 1 and east half lot 2, block 8, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

J. U. (Junia Uriah) Hubbard Estate, lot 1 and east half lot 2, block 8, 1927 T-A, $1,260.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: lot 1 and east half lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

J. U. (Junia Uriah) Hubbard Estate 1927 T-A.

 

Street address: West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: west half of lot 2 and lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to William Graham, lots 1 and 2, block 8 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 13, 1866, $175.

Lot 2: Heirs of William Graham to Grace Graham, lot 1, block 5; and lots 1 and 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1892.

Lot 2: Grace Graham to George McHugh, west half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1905, $85.

Lot 2: L. C. Martner to Henry Schobert, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 2: Guy O. Corzine to Lewis Christian, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 2: John Wampah, et al, to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots1, 2, and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off east end block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914.

Lot 2: Arthur W. Hubbard, et al, to Ralph Hubbard, lot 1 and east half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1932.

Lot 2: Ralph & Ruby Hubbard to Clifford F. & Luella U. Naden lot 1 and east half of lot 2, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1938.

 

Lot 2: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schumacher and daughter, Christine Mary, have moved from the house just south of the courthouse to their new home on West Hydraulic Avenue, recently purchased from the Farmers’ Elevator Company.665

 

Lot 2: A garage is being erected at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schumacher, The old barn has been removed, leaving a fine view of the river from the house.666

 

William Graham, lots 1 and 2, block 8, 1899 T-A, $200.

 

Charles Schumacher, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

J. U. (Junia Uriah) Hubbard Estate, lot 1 and east half lot 2, block 8, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

J. U. (Junia Uriah) Hubbard Estate, lot 1 and east half lot 2, block 8, 1931 T-A, $1,260.

 

Alice Schumacher, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,050.

 

 

Lot 3

 

Street address: West Hydraulic Avenue.

Legal description: west half of lot 2 and lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Mary McHugh, lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 7, 1865, $74.50.

Lot 3: Daniel G. Johnson & wife to Mary and George McHugh, lot 2, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 24, 1871, $150.

Lot 3: Mary McHugh, et al, to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 3, block 8 and lot 1, block 9 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 24, 1871, $150.

Lot 3: George & Mary McHugh to Ami D. Newton, lot 3, block 8 and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition, November 5, 1875, $100.

Lot 3: Ami D. Newton to Mary McHugh, lot 3, block 8; and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition, November 5, 1878, $100.

Lot 3: Mary McHugh to Mary McHugh, lot 3, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition, November 27, 1880, $500.

Lot 3: George, Jr. and Mary McHugh to Mary McHugh, lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, block ? (Commissioner’s Subdivision?); and lot 3, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, in Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 24, 1881, $900.

Lot 3: Mary McHugh to George McHugh, lot 1, block 9; and lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 11, 1885, $500.

Lot 3: L. C. Martner to Henry Schobert, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 3: Guy O. Corzine to Lewis Christian, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 3: John Wampah, et al, to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots1, 2, and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off east end block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914.

 

Lot 3: George McHugh is having a new kitchen built onto his brick house near the railroad track. It is quite an improvement to the old structure which was done away with.667

 

Lot 3: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schumacher and daughter, Christine Mary, have moved from the house just south of the courthouse to their new home on West Hydraulic Avenue, recently purchased from the Farmers’ Elevator Company.668

 

Lot 3: A garage is being erected at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schumacher, The old barn has been removed, leaving a fine view of the river from the house.669

 

George McHugh, lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $200.

 

Charles Schumacher, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

Alice Schumacher, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,050.

 

George McHugh to John Wampah, et al, part of blocks 8, 9 and 10 of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1910, $2,500.

 

Block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Between the railroad and the river, west of block 8.

 

Lot 1

 

Lot faces on West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Lot 1: Daniel G. Johnson & wife to Mary and George McHugh, lot 2, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 24, 1871, $150.

Lot 1: Daniel G. Johnson & wife to Mary and George McHugh, lot 2, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 24, 1871, $150.

Lot 1: George & Mary McHugh to Ami D. Newton, lot 3, block 8 and lot 1, block 9, November 5, 1875, $100.

Lot 1: Ami D. Newton to Mary McHugh, lot 3, block 8; and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 5, 1878, $100.

Lot 1: Mary McHugh to Mary McHugh, lot 3, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, November 27, 1880, $500.

Lot 1: George, Jr. and Mary McHugh to Mary McHugh, lots 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, block ? (County Property?); and lot 3, block 8, and lot 1, block 9, in Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 24, 1881, $900.

Lot 1: Mary McHugh to George McHugh, lot 1, block 9; and lot 3, block 8, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 11, 1885, $500.

Lot 1: L. C. Martner to Henry Schobert, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 1: Guy O. Corzine to Lewis Christian, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 1: John Wampah, et al, to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots1, 2, and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off east end block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, to Yorkville, January 1914.

 

George McHugh, lot 1, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,260.

 

Lot 2

 

Lot faces on West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Wellington Mason, lot 1, block 4, and east half of lot 2, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 5, 1870, $250.

Lot 2: Wellington Mason & wife to George M. Johnson, lot 2 and 3, block 9, and 30 feet off of the east side of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 4, 1888, $800.

Lot 2: George M. Johnson to George McHugh, lots 2 and 3, block 9 and part of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $325.

Lot 2: L. C. Martner to Henry Schobert, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 2: Guy O. Corzine to Lewis Christian, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 2: John Wampah, et al, to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots1, 2, and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off east end block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914.

 

George M. Johnson, lots 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $30.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,260.

 

Lot 3

 

Lot faces on West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Lot 3: Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Wellington Mason, lot 3, and west half of lot 2, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 25, 1865, $1,800.

Lot 3: Wellington Mason & wife to George M. Johnson, lot 2 and 3, block 9, and 30 feet off of the east side of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 4, 1888, $800.

Lot 3: George M. Johnson to George McHugh, lots 2 and 3, block 9 and part of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $325.

Lot 3: L. C. Martner to Henry Schobert, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 3: Guy O. Corzine to Lewis Christian, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Lot 3: John Wampah, et al, to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots1, 2, and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off east end block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914.

 

George M. Johnson, lots 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $30.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $630.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,260.

 

George McHugh to John Wampah, et al, part of blocks 8, 9 and 10 of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1910, $2,500.

 

Block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Between the railroad and the river, west of block 9.

No lots platted.

 

Washington Thomas & wife to Linus F. Hall, lots 4 and 5, block 4; and blocks 10 and 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 18, 1870, $2,000.

Wellington Mason & wife to George M. Johnson, lot 2 and 3, block 9, and 30 feet off of the east side of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 4, 1888, $800.

George M. Johnson to George McHugh, lots 2 and 3, block 9 and part of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1904, $325.

George McHugh to John Wampah, et al, part of blocks 8, 9 and 10 of Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, April 1910, $2,500.

L. C. Martner to Henry Schobert, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

Guy O. Corzine to Lewis Christian, one-seventh interest in west half off lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots 1, 2 and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off of east end of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1911.

John Wampah, et al, to Farmers’ Elevator Company of Yorkville, west half lot 2 and all of lot 3, block 8; lots1, 2, and 3, block 9; and 30 feet off east end block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1914.

Andrew C. Weber to Frank F. Weber, part of block 10, block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of section 32-37-7, $250, March 1933.

Ewald E. and Dina Weber to Frank F. Weber, part of block 10, block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of section 32-37-7, $300, March 1933.

Richard and Myrtle E. Weber to Frank F. Weber, part of block 10, block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of section 32-37-7, $300, March 1933.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Thomas of Thomas, Illinois motored to Yorkville last Saturday and called on his old friend, George McHugh and family. They were accompanied by their son John, wife and daughter, and Mrs. Hodgboom, Mr. Thomas’ sister from Kewanee, Illinois. Mr. Thomas will be remembered by the old settlers as the son of Washington Thomas, who was engaged quite extensively in the cattle and hog business in Yorkville many years ago on the land now occupied by the Farmers’ Elevator Company. He also opened the first meat market in Yorkville on the lots now occupied by Mrs. Andreas Weber.670

 

George M. Johnson 30 feet off of east side of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $6.

 

Andreas Weber, 170 feet west side of block 10 and all of block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $90.

 

Andreas Weber, 170 feet west side of block 10 and all of block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $280.

 

Andreas Weber, 170 feet west side of block 10 and all of block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $550.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., 30 feet off of east side of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $15.

 

Farmers’ Elevator Co., 30 feet off of east side of block 10, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $30.

 

 

Block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Between the railroad and the river, west of block 10.

No lots platted.

 

Block 10 faces on West Hydraulic Avenue.

 

Jacob P. and Elias A. Black & wives to Washington Thomas, lot 5, block 4, and block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, February 27, 1864, $150.

Washington Thomas & wife to Linus F. Hall, lots 4 and 5, block 4; and blocks 10 and 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 18, 1870, $2,000.

Andrew C. Weber to Frank F. Weber, part of block 10, block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of section 32-37-7, $250, March 1933.

Ewald E. and Dina Weber to Frank F. Weber, part of block 10, block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of section 32-37-7, $300, March 1933.

Richard and Myrtle E. Weber to Frank F. Weber, part of block 10, block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of section 32-37-7, $300, March 1933.

 

Andreas Weber, 170 feet west side of block 10 and all of block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $90.

 

Andreas Weber, 170 feet west side of block 10 and all of block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $280.

 

Andreas Weber, 170 feet west side of block 10 and all of block 11, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $550.

 

Block 12, Black’s (First) Addition to Yorkville

No lots platted.

 

Block 12 is between the railroad and East Van Emon Road; and between Heustis and Mill Streets.

 

Street address: ? Heustis Street

Legal description: south 2/3 block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

 

Hemm & Hardekopf Produce, Charles G. Hardekopf & Theodore Hemm proprietors (December 1911 – March 1923)

Kendall County Produce Company, organized as a corporation (March 1923 - )
Model Industries

Saw Mill

 

Hopkins & Johnson Lumber Yard ( - May 1885)

Jeter & Boston Lumber and Coal Yard, L. J. Jeter and William T. Boston Proprietors (May 1885 - )

Yorkville Elevator, J. G. Scott proprietor ( - October 1887)

Jeter & Boston Grain Elevator, L. J. Jeter and William T. Boston Proprietors (October 1887 - )

 

Charles G. Hardekopf, the Yorkville merchant, has bought the property formerly used as a ball diamond on the east end of town to erect a cold storage plant where he will eventually handle all the dairy products that have formerly come to the downtown store. The building will be of concrete as a base, and provide for the handling of chickens, veal and cream. A side track will later run to it and the shipping facilities improved.671

 

The building to be built by Charles Hardekopf as a refrigerating plant is underway and the water system is being connected with the future service. Sand is on the ground for the cement work and Mr. Hardekopf will push the work as fast as possible.672

 

The increase in the business at the poultry warehouse has been so great that Charles G. Hardekopf has been forced to abandon his grocery business in favor of his new line. He will, therefore, offer exceptionally low prices for cash only on his entire stock of groceries beginning Monday morning January 10. The building in which his grocery is located is also for sale. Mr. Hardekopf offers some rare bargains, better get in early and get them.673

 

Oliver A. McDowell has closed a deal through the June Hubbard agency whereby he will take possession of the Charles G. Hardekopf grocery with its remaining stock on Monday February 7. He will move his present store to the new location on that date and continue to handle his grocery and market. Mr. Hardekopf will retire from the retail business and devote his entire time to his storage plant and warehouse.674

 

An addition is being erected on the east side of the main building of the Hemm and Hardekopf cold storage plant. It will be used for the production of “milk fed” chickens for the Chicago market. The wing, like the rest of the building, is of concrete blocks and will have a capacity for feeding 5,000 chickens at one time. Mr. Hardekopf has made his storage and cream plant one of the best businesses in Yorkville. His partner, Theodore Hemm, has charge of the Aurora offices and the two are kept busy.

The plant handles chickens and other poultry, veal, eggs and cream and milk products. There is a large cold storage plant in connection and, in season the picking department employees a number of people. Herman Kreuger is Mr. Hardekopf’s right hand man, and Miss Esther Wollenweber has charge of the books.675

 

The Hemm & Hardekopf Company has enjoyed great success for the past ten years in Yorkville. Business has increased until the firm is unable to continue as a partnership and has organized the firm as a corporation under the name of the Kendall County Produce Company. The organization process has been in the works for several months but conditions were such that the incorporating was not finished until a few days ago. The new firm takes possession of the old firm’s assets March 17, 1923. A large protion of the stock in the new concern has been sold but there is still a good sized block which can be purchased by anyone interested upon application to Charles G. Hardekopf. The shares are $100 each. The officers in the temporary organization are Charles G. Hardekopf, president; Theodore Hemm, vice president; William T. Boston, secretary; Esther Wollenweber, assistant secretary; Herman F. Ebrecht, treasurer; Oscar Friedberg, Theodore Hemm, C. G. Hardekopf, W. T. Boston and Bernie J. Stumm directors.

About ten years ago, Charlie Hardekopf gave up his grocery store in Yorkville and entered, with Theodore Hemm, in the poultry, egg and veal business. They bought a piece of property east of the Valley Garage and built a storage plant which has constantly grown in size and efficiency until the business is one of the largest in the village. The firm has grown from handling 50,000 pounds of poultry during their first year of operations to handling 500,000 pounds of poultry in 1922.676

 

 

 

Jeter & Boston have purchased the entire business interest of Mr. J. G. Scott. We call the attention of the farmers to the fact that we are now ready to handle grain, and ask your liberal patronage. We will pay you the highest market prices and endeavor to please you in this department. To our coal patrons we would say, hard coal is now coming freely and our booking orders will be filled promply and at prices agreed upon. We have lowered the price of soft coal to suit the times and hope to take your orders.

Our lumber department will not suffer by this extension of business. You will still find us up with the times and down with prices. We have now on hand an extra good grade of common boards (very wide) suitable for covering sheds, cribs, etc. Call and examine our stock and obtain prices before purchasing.677

 

Jeter & Boston have bought out J. G. Scott’s interest in the Yorkville Grain Elevator and coal business. Our people are sorry Mr. Scott has given up business here, for he has been an energetic man in all he has undertaken. He will be greatly missed in many ways. However, the grain trade here promises to be very light for the coming year, as the crops are a failure. There will not be enough business to keep a man at work. Mr. Scott will remain here through the winter, probably to settle up his business. Jeter & Boston have made themselves solid people here and will do their best to give them satisfaction.678

 

The purchase of the Yorkville elevator by Jeter & Boston last week, and the proposed new changes in the structure and plant to begin early in the spring, will be matters of considerable interest to farmers who deliver grain here, and likewise to Yorkville folks, who will see a marked increase in business.

The Yorkville elevator is an old landmark in Yorkville. Many years ago it was originally built by Thurber & Godard. John M. Thurber was a brother of Willard Thurber of Kendall Township. The firm disposed of its business, and Mr. Godard secured title to the building. Later it became a part of the estate of the late Walter Van Emon by a Master’s deed. After the death of Mr. Van Emon it was transferred to Frank W. Lord of Plano, who is a relative of the Van Emon family. Mr. Lord has owned the building and Jeter & Boston have rented it from him.679

 

The Yorkville elevator folks expect to soon be tearing up the old premises in order to construct an elevator of modern design. It was at first planned to remodel the old building, but the structure is too ancient to be of much further service, and new plant will be built from the ground up. Yorkville will then have the best elevator on the Fox River line.680

 

Workmen are engaged in tearing down the Yorkville grain elevator. Thus another of our landmarks disappears.681

 

Yorkville’s new elevator has been in the course of erection for about two months, during which time the gang of twenty men have torn down the old landmark, destroyed every vestige of the former building, and erected a new one from the basement up to a height of eighty-five feet. The first load of oats came into the new Jeter & Boston elevator this past Wednesday.682

 

The firm of Jeter & Boston is entering into its forty-fifth year of valuable service to the community of Yorkville. L. J. Jeter of Roanoke, Illinois and W. T. Boston of Leland came here May 15, 1885, and took over the elevator, coal and lumber business. Both were businessmen of a high type and made a success of the business. All regretted the death of Mr. Boston, which came just as he had reached the time when he could enjoy a vacation and start for Scotland to visit the homes of his ancestors. Mr. Jeter is still an active man although his end of the business is largely handled by his son L. R. Jeter. The Boston interests are capably entrusted to J. Robert Boston.683

 

The grain and lumber firm of Jeter & Boston was formed fifty years ago.

Brothers-in-law, L. J. (Luther Johnson) Jeter and W. T. (William T.) Boston formed a partnership and opened the business in 1885. Mr. Boston had been engaged in a like business in Leland for fourteen years. Mr. Jeter was engaged in the hardware business in Woodford County, IL.

From the Kendall County Record of May 20, 1885, “Our Yorkville lumber yard has changed hands. Hopkins and Johnson have sold out to Jeter & Boston, two gentlemen who have the appearance of businessmen. Mr. Jeter is from Woodruff County, where he has been engaged in the hardware business for many years. Mr. Boston is from Leland, and has been engaged in the lumber trade twelve years; he is a brother-in-law of George Starr, our meat market man.

The new firm will at once put in a large stock of lumber and building material, hard and soft coal, and will also sell doors, blinds, sash, cement, etc. They promise to deal by the farmers of Kendall County in a manner that will give satisfaction and insure the patronage. We ask that a proper consideration for the new firm to insure the business’ success.

The Messrs. Jeter and Boston became respected citizens of our community, and with their families became prominent in the civic and social life of the town. Their deaths occurred several years ago and left unfilled voids in the community.

Their families “carried on,” keeping the business. L. Ray Jeter and John Robert Boston kept the firm name and the business upon the same high plane to which it was started by their father’s. Lieutenant J. Robert Boston died a year ago from wounds received in the World War, leaving L. Ray Jeter in charge of the business.”684

 

 

Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to James A. Godard, part northeast corner block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 6, 1872, $250.

James A. Godard & wife to John N. Thurber, part northeast corner block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1, 1875, $4,000.

James A. Godard & wife to John N. Thurber, part of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1, 1876, $3,000.

George M. Hollenback, Master in Chancery, to J. O. Curry, Certificate of purchase, land in northeast corner of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 31, 1883, $1,090.

Master in Chancery to Walter W. Van Emon, part of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 2, 1884, $1,090.

Elizabeth H. Van Emon, widow, to Frank W. Lord, part of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 12, 1889, $1,800.

Master in Chancery, to M. Louise Newton, south 2/3rds block 12, Black’s First
Addition, March 1903, $200.

Frank W. Lord to Jeter & Boston, the part of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, containing the elevator, October 1906, $3,000.

Louis B. Newton to Charles G. Hardekopf, south 2/3 rds of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1915, $1,000. (Check seller’s name.)

Charles G. Hardekopf to Kendall County Produce Company, south 2/3 rds of block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1923.

Roy W. Boston, Receiver, etc., to Yorkville National Bank, deed to part of blocks 6 and 12, Black’s Addition to First Addition to Yorkville, June 1936, $3750.

 

Jacob P. and Elias A. Black, part of block 12, 1899 T-A, $30.

 

Frank W. Lord, northeast fractional quarter, block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $500.

 

Charles G. Hardekopf, south 2/3rds block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1916 T-A, increased to $700.

 

Charles G. Hardekopf, south 2/3rds block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1920 T-A, increased to $1,800.

 

Kendall County Produce Co., south 2/3rds block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,100.

 

Kendall County Produce Co., south 2/3rds block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $4,200.

 

Jeter & Boston, northeast frontage quarter block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $2,610.

 

Jeter & Boston, northeast frontage quarter block 12, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $5,220.

 

Block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

No lots platted.

 

Southeast corner of East Van Emmon Road and Mill Streets.

Street address: 306 East Van Emmon Road.

Legal description: east half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

 

John A. Beeman to Lydia D. Bell, west half of lot 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 1, 1880, $200.

Lydia D. Bell to Benjamin F. Herrington, west half of lot 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 1, 1880, $1,300.

Emma Dunbar to Joseph Junkins, lot 1, block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 10, 1882, $500.

Master in Chancery to Georgia S. Herrington, east half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 1903, $233.34.

Grace O. & Kay A. Lindemann to Caroline Pratt Herrington, east half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, August 1937.

Grace O. & Kay A. Lindemann to Caroline Pratt Herrington, west half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 1937.

 

(Something missing here) west half of block 13, July 26, 1866, $820. ($320?)

 

Attorney Benjamin F. Herrington has moved his law office from the building occupied by the Hunter Pharmacy, where he had been a tenant for over 25 years to his residence on the corner of East Hydraulic Avenue and Mill Street.

Mrs. Benjamin F. Herrington has rented her house recently vacated by the H. J. Wittrup family to Mrs. Mabel Wittrup who will make her home there with her mother, Mrs. Black, and her son, William Wendell Wittrup.

 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Holt and family moved last week from Fox into the Herrington house on East Van Emmon Street.685

 

Jacob P. and Elias A. Black, east half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $35.

 

Georgia S. Herrington, east half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $90.

 

Georgia S. Herrington, east half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $180.

 

Benjamin F. Herrington, west half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $310.

 

Benjamin F. Herrington, west half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $900.

 

Georgia S. Herrington, west half of block 13, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,800.

 

Block 14, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

No lots platted.

Elias A. Black’s home.

 

Block 14 is on the southeast corner East Van Emon Road and Heustis Streets.

 

 

Jacob P. Black & wife to Elias A. Black, block 14, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1863.

Heirs of Elias A. Black to M. Louise Newton, block 14, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, and part of southwest quarter, section 33, Kendall Township, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 18, 1887, $1,200.

 

M. Louise (Black) Newton was the daughter of Elias A. and Elizabeth Black and wife of William R. Newton. William R. was the president of the Yorkville National Bank.

 

Elias Augustus Black came to Yorkville in 1849 and built his house on block 14 about that time.

 

Mrs. William R. Newton (Mrs. Louise B. Newton), block 14, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $600.

 

Mrs. William R. Newton (Mrs. Louise B. Newton), block 14, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,870.

 

Mrs. William R. Newton (Mrs. Louise B. Newton), block 14, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $3,750.

 

Block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville

No lots platted.

Jacob P. Black’s home.

 

Street address: 301 Heustis Street.

Legal description: lot 6, block 15 and land adjacent on the south, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

House constructed for Joseph Stumm in 1905.

Block 15 is on the southwest corner East Van Emon Road and Heustis Streets.

 

Elias A. Black to Jacob P. Black, block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, July 22, 1863.

Jacob P. Black married Louise W. Mather daughter of Charles Cotton and Mary Mather.

May V. Bartlett, by Sheriff to Milton E. Cornell, Certificate of sale, block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, June 24, 1889.

Joseph H. Stumm to August Leifheit, part of block 15, February 29, 1904, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, $3000.

 

Jacob Peeky Black moved from Millington to Yorkville in about 1856 and his house on the hill was built about that time.

“It is said that Mr. August Leifheit has bought the Joe Stumm residence in Yorkville, the old Jacob P. Black place on the hill.”686

“August Leifheit and family are now occupying the old Black house on the bluff, formerly owned by Joseph Stumm.”687

 

August Leifheit to Joe Stumm, part of section 33, Yorkville, March 1, 1904, $300.

 

Land reserved from the sale of the Jacob Black home to August Leifheit.

“Joseph Stumm will put up a modern residence on Heustis Street opposite the W. R. Newton place on the lots he reserved out of the old Black homestead when he sold to Mr. Leifheit.”688 Mr. Stumm’s new home was on the west side of Heustis Street, first house north of the Roe, Marshall, and Loomis home.

“Mr. Joe Stumm’s house is far enough along to indicate what a pretty house the family will have. The siding is partly on and is being painted as it goes and is attractive.”689

“Henry Chappell’s carpenters are finishing the interior finish to the Stumm residence on Heustis Street. It will be ready for occupancy in a month or so. It is one of the most convenient and nicely arranged residences in town.”690

“Joe Stumm and family have moved into their new residence on Heustis Street. They have a beautiful home.”691

 

The August Leifheit property, better known as the Jacob P. Black estate was sold at auction Saturday afternoon by Frank Fasmer, Administrator, of the estate. The house and lots brought $1,300 in excess of the mortgage, the total amount being, $2,469.34. This land covers between four and five acres and is as pretty a place for a residence as there is in Yorkville. The sale is subject to the approval of the county court in session August 7. If the sale is approved, Mr. Nading will use the place as his residence.”692

 

Joseph H. Stumm to August Hage, 80 by 175 on part of section 33, on the south side of the Fox River, April 1917.

 

Estate of Jacob P. Black, block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $600.

 

Justus Nading, part of block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $1,750.

 

Justus Nading, part of block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $3,500.

 

Joseph H. Stumm, lot in southeast corner of block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1905 T-A, increased to $400.

 

August Hage, lot in southeast corner of block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, (301 Heustis Street), 1927 T-A, $1,130.

 

August Hage, lot in southeast corner of block 15, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, (301 Heustis Street), 1931 T-A, $2,250.

 

 

Block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville
Southeast corner of Van Emon and Morgan Streets.

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 412 West Van Emmon Road.

Legal description: lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville.

Southeast corner of VanEmon and Morgan Streets.

 

 

Lot 1: George M. Hollenback, Administrator, to Izilah Dunbar & husband, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, March 17, 1885, $50.

Lot 1: Hester Thurber, et al, to Daniel G. Johnson, lot 4, block 21, and lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, May 12, 1866, $115.

Lot 1: Elias A. Black & wife to Izilah Dunbar, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, March 17, 1885, $50.

Lot 1: Mary A. Shibley to Nellie K. Leverich, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, April 1903, $1,350.

Lot 7: Izilla Dunbar to Morrison A. Gardner, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, and lots 7 and 8, block 25, Original Village of Yorkville, May 1927, $1,000.

Lot 8: Morrison A. & Hilda M. Gardner to Anna L. Harris, lots 7 and 8, block 25,

Original Village of Yorkville, and lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 5, 1937.

 

Lot 1: Vacant lot in 1870.

 

Izilla Dunbar, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $20.

 

Izilla Dunbar, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $50.

 

Morrison A. Gardner, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $100.

 

Lot 2

 

Lot 2: Street address: 411 Madison Street.

Legal description: lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot 2 is on the northeast corner of Madison and Morgan Streets.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Thomas T. Britton, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville; and lot 1, block 25, Original Village of Yorkville, August 13, 1864, $350.

Lot 2: James W. Lee & wife to Richard M. Springer, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, ; and lot 1, block 25, Original Village of Yorkville, September 22, 1868, $1,000.

Lot 2: Richard M. Springer to James Springer, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, ; and lot 1, block 25 Original Village of Yorkville, June 12, 1869, $1,000.

Lot 2: Thomas T. Britton to James W. Lee, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, ; and lot 1, block 25, Original Village of Yorkville, April 1896, $800.

Lot 2: Sophia Burton to E. A. & H. A. Lormor, lot 1, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Village of Yorkville, April 1896, $1,400.

 

In 1870, a house was located on lot 2, block 16, Black’s Addition to Yorkville, facing Madison Street.

 

Flora Weaver Rarick, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $200.

 

Flora Weaver Rarick, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $700.

 

Flora Weaver Rarick Estate, lot 2, block 16, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $1,400.

 

Block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville
Southeast corner of Madison and Morgan Streets.

 

Lot 1

 

Street address: 402 Morgan Street.

Legal description: west 77 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

Lot one is located on the southeast corner of Madison and Morgan Streets.

 

Street address: 410 West Madison Street.

Legal description: west half of lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville and east 55 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 1: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Engle Maria S. Muehlke, lots 1 and 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, November 9, 1864, $350.

Lot 1: Engle Maria S. Muehlke to James Springer, east 50 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, November 14, 1867, $375.

Lot 1: Engle Maria S. & Henry Muehlke to Valentine “Cook” Atherton, lots 1 and 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 20, 1869, $1,300.

Lot 1: Willis Atkins & wife to Joshua N. Austin, north half lot 1, and part lot 4, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 10, 1879, $1,300.

Lot 1: James B. Littlewood & wife to Samuel Arundale, east 50 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half of lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, November 3, 1884, $1,000.

Lot 1: James Arundale to Jennie Arundale, east 50 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, May 1893.

Lot 1: Master in Chancery to Morgan A. Skinner, east 50 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half of lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, March 1894, $400.

Lot 1: Heirs of Morgan A. Skinner to William E. Morrison, east 50 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half of lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, June 1910.

Lot 1: William E. Morrison to Eugene A. Manley, east 50 feet of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half of lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, August 1910.

Lot 1: Eugene A. Manley to Joseph O. Eccles, east 50 feet off of lot 1, block 17 Black’s First Addition to Yorkville; and west half of lot 8, block 22, Original Village of Yorkville, March 1915, $700.

Lot 1: Thomas Henry Atherton and Bessie L. Ahrens to Edward Budd, lot 1 except 50 feet off the east side of lot 1, and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1917.

Lot 1: Edward Budd to Thomas Henry Atherton and Grace E. Atherton, lot 1 except 50 feet off the east side of lot 1, and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1917.

Lot 1: Grace E. Atherton, widow, to Harriet A. Lormor, west half lot 1 and lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1920.

 

Lot 1: In 1870 a house was located in the north east corner of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Morgan A. Skinner, east half of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $100.

 

V. C. Atherton, west half of lot 1, and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $400.

 

Joseph O. Eccles, east half of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $250.

 

Joseph O. Eccles, east half of lot 1, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $500.

 

Harriet A. Lormor, west half of lot 1 and lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $450.

 

Harriet A. Lormor, west half of lot 1 and lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1931 T-A, $900.

 

Lot 2

 

Street address: 409 West Ridge Street.

Legal description: lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville.

 

Lot 2: Jacob P. & Elias A. Black & wives to Engle Maria S. Muehlke, lots 1 and 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, ; and west half lot 8, block 22, Yorkville, November 9, 1864, $350.

Lot 2: Engle Maria S. & Henry Muehlke to Valentine “Cook” Atherton, lots 1 and 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, December 20, 1869, $1,300.

Lot 2: Thomas Henry Atherton and Bessie L. Ahrens to Edward Budd, lot 1 except 50 feet off the east side of lot 1, and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1917.

Lot 2: Edward Budd to Thomas Henry Atherton and Grace E. Atherton, lot 1 except 50 feet off the east side of lot 1, and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, January 1917.

Lot 2: Grace E. Atherton, widow, to Harriet A. Lormor, part of lot 1 and lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, March 1920.

 

Lot 2: In 1870 a building was located in the northeast corner of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, which could have been a house or a barn. Lot 2 is located on the northeast corner of West Ridge and Morgan Streets.

 

William M. Ford & wife to Robert Lormor, 132 feet by 100 feet of block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, September 17, 1885, $490.

 

V. C. Atherton, west half of lot 1, and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1899 T-A, $400.

 

Harriet A. Lormor, west half of lot 1 and all of lot 2, block 17, Black’s First Addition to Yorkville, 1927 T-A, $450.



Last Modified on 2014-04-09 05:20:47-0500 CDT by Optimizer